kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Kapuściński non-fiction

Availability: Ready to download

Pierwsza tak obszerna, obejmująca całe życie i dzieło, książka o Ryszardzie Kapuścińskim (1932-2007), pióra wybitnego dziennikarza i reportera „Gazety Wyborczej”. Doskonale udokumentowana, pełna celnych analiz opowieść o „człowieku, żyjącym w poplątanych czasach, w kilku epokach, w różnych światach” na szerokim tle wydarzeń społeczno-politycznych ostatniego półwiecza w Pol Pierwsza tak obszerna, obejmująca całe życie i dzieło, książka o Ryszardzie Kapuścińskim (1932-2007), pióra wybitnego dziennikarza i reportera „Gazety Wyborczej”. Doskonale udokumentowana, pełna celnych analiz opowieść o „człowieku, żyjącym w poplątanych czasach, w kilku epokach, w różnych światach” na szerokim tle wydarzeń społeczno-politycznych ostatniego półwiecza w Polsce i za granicą. Domosławski odważnie podejmuje wnikliwą próbę charakterystyki Kapuścińskiego - człowieka pełnego sprzeczności, wokół którego narosło wiele kontrowersji.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Pierwsza tak obszerna, obejmująca całe życie i dzieło, książka o Ryszardzie Kapuścińskim (1932-2007), pióra wybitnego dziennikarza i reportera „Gazety Wyborczej”. Doskonale udokumentowana, pełna celnych analiz opowieść o „człowieku, żyjącym w poplątanych czasach, w kilku epokach, w różnych światach” na szerokim tle wydarzeń społeczno-politycznych ostatniego półwiecza w Pol Pierwsza tak obszerna, obejmująca całe życie i dzieło, książka o Ryszardzie Kapuścińskim (1932-2007), pióra wybitnego dziennikarza i reportera „Gazety Wyborczej”. Doskonale udokumentowana, pełna celnych analiz opowieść o „człowieku, żyjącym w poplątanych czasach, w kilku epokach, w różnych światach” na szerokim tle wydarzeń społeczno-politycznych ostatniego półwiecza w Polsce i za granicą. Domosławski odważnie podejmuje wnikliwą próbę charakterystyki Kapuścińskiego - człowieka pełnego sprzeczności, wokół którego narosło wiele kontrowersji.

30 review for Kapuściński non-fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lorenzo Berardi

    Let's play a role game. You are a young journalist hired by the best newspaper of your homecountry. You're talented and ambitious, but not that experienced. Among your colleagues in the newsroom there's a middle aged and well read reporter who everyone looks at in awe. Not only this guy travelled and reported from four continents. This guy is unanimously considered the dean of reporters nationwide and even gained recognition abroad. Step by step you get to know the great reporter. He's getting ba Let's play a role game. You are a young journalist hired by the best newspaper of your homecountry. You're talented and ambitious, but not that experienced. Among your colleagues in the newsroom there's a middle aged and well read reporter who everyone looks at in awe. Not only this guy travelled and reported from four continents. This guy is unanimously considered the dean of reporters nationwide and even gained recognition abroad. Step by step you get to know the great reporter. He's getting bald, but is still athletic. He's charming, polite and considerate: no wonder women adore him. He smiles to everyone and dishes out compliments and tips to the younger journalists, including you. It doesn't matter that most of those tips are rather generic as they come from Him, the Maestro. In the meantime you write and publish your own stuff, you get experience and gain some credit into the journalism circles. Now the Maestro pops up very rarely in the newsroom. After all, he has a score of prestigious invitations to oblige. He's often abroad leading seminars, workshops, collecting prizes and meeting his evergrowing readers. And yet, the Dean of Reporters does spend some of his precious time with you. He invites you at his home. He calls you. He talks politics with you. You two even argue sometimes. That's a privilege and you know it. Do you know Him well? Not that much. True, you'd like to know the Maestro better, but he doesn't like private questions and always looks reluctant when asked about his youth and his earlier adventures abroad. You notice that reticence, but that doesn't bother you much. You've your own features to work on and your own travels to write home about. Then the Maestro passes away. A few months later you start working on your next book: His biography. Now some questions arise: - Why would you like to write this biography? - What are you going to write about those years and those topics He never talked about? - Who are you going to interview to learn more about Him? - Where are you going to take your readers, people who loved His books and wish to know more about Him? - When are you going to stop in making speculations and writing hidden details of His private life? And, first and foremost: - How would you like to portray this friend of yours, this dean of reporters turned into national hero? I believe Artur Domoslawski posed similar questions to himself and I'm glad he did. For this 'Ryszard Kapuscinski: A Life' (the original Polish title, 'Kapuscinski non-fiction', should have been kept) was certainly not an easy book to write. Which doesn't mean that this biography is not interesting to read; in fact quite the contrary. I do understand Kapuscinski's widow and many reviewers bearing a grudge on the author upon the publication of this book. The dean of Polish journalism and one of the most famous reporters worldwide to date doesn't come out as an entirely positive character from this biography. To those - like me - who loved Kapuscinski's reportages and essays, Mr Domoslawski could look rather ruthless in writing about the dark sides of the great Polish journalist. Especially considering how he knew him quite well and was a colleague of his. Sometimes the author seems to enjoy digging into Kapuscinski's dirty laundry revealing his extramarital relationships, the troubles with his estranged daughter as well as his political involvement in communist Poland. Tu quoque, Brute! Well, to some extent. True, Mr Domoslawski is far from being soft with his old pal Ryszard and could have easily left out some of the nastiest stuff about him, but I don't look at him as if he stabbed dead Kapuscinski in the back. Hundreds of pages here are devoted to the great reporter travels and accomplishments and there is literally a ton of quotations from his most and less famous works. To me it looks crystal clear how the author studied Kapuscinski's oeuvre very carefully and delivered a great insight on his complex personality. Had Mr Domoslawski ignored the shadows drawn by the shining sun of the great reporter, it would have been harder to appreciate what the dean of Polish journalists left us. And what did Kapuscinski leave us is essentially fantastic literature written with passion and dedication, books full of illuminating observations on the human nature and brilliant analysis on power in politics. As it happened, most of this excellent literature was delivered through reportages which were - strictly speaking - works of art rather than dry chronicling. Kapuscinski did embellish or dramatize some of his facts and was aware of that: he just couldn't admit that in public as everyone labelled him a journalist. And yet he considered himself an author, an intellectual, a poet and, coming fourth, a reporter. Towards the end of his life, Kapuscinski became a victim of his own myth: readers and fellow journalists expected him to tell them how to become reporters, how to put facts into beautiful words. But what he would have liked to teach them was rather how to put beauty into facts. Unless that he couldn't say that. They regarded him as a Maestro of factual objectivity, but he pursued feelings not objectivity and loved to take sides. Domoslawski explains this inner dilemma (and others) very well and this goes to his credit. Five stars don't belong here, see my mild criticism above, but four do fit well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Elliott

    Domosławski’s biography of Kapuściński seems to me to be essential reading for anyone interested in Kapuściński’s writing, his understanding of the processes of radical political and social change; the working through and aftermath of power shifts; and the effects of war and poverty on ordinary people in all the countries where he worked. Kapuściński spent much of his working life out of Poland, in Africa, Latin America and Iran among other places. He started out as a working journalist, reporti Domosławski’s biography of Kapuściński seems to me to be essential reading for anyone interested in Kapuściński’s writing, his understanding of the processes of radical political and social change; the working through and aftermath of power shifts; and the effects of war and poverty on ordinary people in all the countries where he worked. Kapuściński spent much of his working life out of Poland, in Africa, Latin America and Iran among other places. He started out as a working journalist, reporting regularly back to his employers (newspapers, magazines), and only after some years of this work did be begin to write the books which were the basis of his reputation in the West. His journalism and incidental writings are in Polish and therefore not accessible to non-Polish speakers. Domosławski has used these Polish sources extensively, together with interviews of Kapuściński’s family, friends and former colleagues, in Poland and other countries, as well as some extracts from his books. Kapuściński’s books were translated into English, Spanish, French, German, Hungarian and other languages, sometimes expurgated to remove content likely to mean their publication might be quashed, as with Shah of Shahs, in which sections were cut for publication in the US (pp286-288). It was through the translated books that Western audiences came to know his work, not through his immediate journalism. Domosławski sets out not just to tell the story of Kapuściński, but to try to understand what drove him Domosławski poses a list of questions to himself and to his interviewees, and feeds both questions and a range of responses to the reader. He tracks Kapuściński’s life chronologically, and uses the steps along the way to discuss questions, adding in comments and memoirs from people who knew him at the time. Some of the questions that Domosławski pursues are raised many times, often with somewhat rhetorical speculation about what might or might not have been motivating Kapuściński at the time. He offers progressive analysis and conclusions, tying up individual sections, but also promising to clear up the matter later on. Repetition is inevitable with this kind of structure, and the summarised conclusions have to be dug for. Very early in this long book, the author points up inconsistencies between Kapuściński’s recall and other records, and the extent to which Kapuściński embellished his own life story. Much of the book is given to examining strands of the Kapuściński Legend, such as the story that Kapuściński’s father was a prisoner of the Soviets during World War Two escaped from their captivity on the way to Katyn. Domosławski suggests Kapuściński begins to tell this story in the early 1990s, when he was under right-wing attack for having collaborated with the Polish intelligence service. Domosławski concludes that Kapuściński’s father was not a Soviet prisoner, and that this is one Kapuściński’s ‘embellishments’. Other Kapuściński legends examined by Domosławski are ‘Sentenced to Death by Firing Squad’; ‘Che, Lumumba and Allende’ (did he actually meet them?; ‘Kapuściński and Kapuściński’; ‘The Price of Greatness’. Challenged about inaccuracies in his writing, Kapuściński said ‘I’m not writing so the details add up – the point is the essence of the matter!” And ‘You can rebuild reality, but taking authentic elements from that reality…It doesn't matter if this guy was killed by three or five bullets. What matters is to convey the essence of the incident’. ‘Reportage as a genre is going through an evolution from journalism to literature’. (pp308-310), he said, I first encountered the term ‘Literary reportage’ in Kapuściński’s Travels With Herodotus. Then I took it to mean high level reporting written with great attention to style, which was a Kapuściński trademark. But I’ve come to realise now that it means something different, not quite faction, but not necessarily accurate in details that might impede the flow of a good story. Kapuściński’s childhood experiences of the 1939-45 war led him to believe it was a decisive experience for everyone who lived through it. This was the period which shaped his view of humanity. ‘Those who lived through the war will never be free of it. It has remained in them like a mental burden, like a painful growth’ that can never be removed. …[It] seemed to me [Kapuściński] that not peace, but war, is the natural state, or even the only one, the only form of existence, that wandering hunger and fear air raids and fires, round-ups and executions, lies and screaming, contempt and hatred were the natural, eternal state of affairs, the meaning of life, the essence of existence’. Some final notes: Kapuściński maintains that revolutions don't necessarily erupt because they have no bread, ‘– not first and foremost - but because they cannot longer put up with the humiliation, the contempt of their rulers, or the violation of their dignity’. ‘My main topic is the life of the poor. That is how I understand the concept of the Third World. The third World is not a geographical term (Asia, Africa, Latin America) or a racial one (the so-called coloured continents’, but an existential one. It refers to the life of poverty that will be typified by stagnation, structural inertia, a tendency to regress, a constant threat of the ultimate collapse, and a general lack of alternatives.’ (p350). ------------------- I found the structure and the almost constant use of present tense verbs mildly irritating. Perhaps they were intended to create a sense of immediacy. Nevertheless, Domosławski has given us fascinating insights into the thought and work of this most interesting man.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    If you are a fan of Kapuscinski, this book will show you his feet of clay. It could be a bit disheartening to discover that some of his iconic scenes, like the Belgian paratroopers threatening to shoot him at dawn, or the drunken army officer wanting to execute him by firing squad are, ahem, embroidered. But Domoslawski, who knew Kapuscinski (inasmuch as anyone did, which is not much) is both sympathetic to his subject and rigorous about exploring the inconsistencies in his accounts of his life. If you are a fan of Kapuscinski, this book will show you his feet of clay. It could be a bit disheartening to discover that some of his iconic scenes, like the Belgian paratroopers threatening to shoot him at dawn, or the drunken army officer wanting to execute him by firing squad are, ahem, embroidered. But Domoslawski, who knew Kapuscinski (inasmuch as anyone did, which is not much) is both sympathetic to his subject and rigorous about exploring the inconsistencies in his accounts of his life. He tries to understand Kapuscinski's motivations, and the results are convincing. Another journalist comments that Kapuscinski was always getting into panic mode and tended to turn a drama into a crisis. That sits oddly with the image you get from his books of a cool-headed daredevil, stopping at nothing to get a story. Kapuscinski cultivated this image all his life, and at some point it became too late to back down from the more lurid parts of it. One of the oddest things is when a jacket blurb on one of his books describes him as having been a friend of Che Guevara and Patrice Lumumba. He never met either man -- Lumumba had been dead for a month when Kapuscinski arrived in the Congo. If he had met them, he would certainly have written about them -- how could he not? Yet he never tried to correct this false impression; he simply didn't confirm it. One journalist came away with the impression that, despite his worldwide fame and star status, Kapuscinski still behaved like someone who lacked self-confidence ...he kept emphasising the fact that he had witnessed such and such a number of revolutions, such and such a number of coups, and repeatedly mentioned that while working on Imperium he had travelled some 60,000 km within the old Soviet Union. 'I remember thinking at the time, "My God, why does he keep on repeating that? ... You don't have to tell me that, you're Kapuscinski!"' Despite his fame and prestige, Kapuscinski couldn't bear criticism, and in the last years of his life he was terrified that enemies in Poland would pull out pieces of his past as a member of the Communist Party in order to disgrace him. Domoslawski has done the research, and it's clear that Kapuscinski had nothing to be ashamed of given his position as a Party member and a journalist who spent much of his life abroad. There's a bit too much about the ins and outs of Polish politics here, but it's well worth reading if you are a fan of Kapuscinski. Also see this review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mmkay

    Książka wzbudziła potężna debatę i duże kontrowersje w momencie wydania. Nie dziwię się temu, bo podczas czytania odkrywałem zupełnie mi nieznane aspekty życia Kapuscińskiego, które stawiały mi go w innym świetle, niż dotąd. Po skończeniu książki mam jednak większą ochotę nadrobić to, czego jeszcze autorstwa RK nie przeczytałem, pomimo tego, że bardziej sobie zdaję teraz sprawę, że nie powinienem traktować jego książek jako reportażu. Chętnie też przeczytam więcej publikacji Domosławskiego. Czyta Książka wzbudziła potężna debatę i duże kontrowersje w momencie wydania. Nie dziwię się temu, bo podczas czytania odkrywałem zupełnie mi nieznane aspekty życia Kapuscińskiego, które stawiały mi go w innym świetle, niż dotąd. Po skończeniu książki mam jednak większą ochotę nadrobić to, czego jeszcze autorstwa RK nie przeczytałem, pomimo tego, że bardziej sobie zdaję teraz sprawę, że nie powinienem traktować jego książek jako reportażu. Chętnie też przeczytam więcej publikacji Domosławskiego. Czytałem wydanie wznowione już przez inne niż pierwotnie wydawnictwo, z bardzo dobrze przygotowanym suplementem pokazującym debatę publiczną po pierwszym wydaniu. Polecam dla zorientowania się, jakie argumenty wysuwały obie strony debaty.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kurtzprzezce

    Z pewnością nie jest to hagiografia Kapuścińskiego, a autorowi udało się uniknąć budowania mitu polskiego reportera. Książka pokazuje również ciemniejsze strony, ale pozostaje przy tym bardzo życzliwa dla Kapuścińskiego. Jak na mój gust aż za bardzo. Mimo znacznej objętości, kilka wątków zostaje jakby pominiętych. Bardzo mało jest np. o zbrodniach rewolucjonistów, których Kapuściński popierał. Domosławski tłumaczy w duchu Kapuścińskiego, że największymi zbrodniarzami były autorytarne rządy wspie Z pewnością nie jest to hagiografia Kapuścińskiego, a autorowi udało się uniknąć budowania mitu polskiego reportera. Książka pokazuje również ciemniejsze strony, ale pozostaje przy tym bardzo życzliwa dla Kapuścińskiego. Jak na mój gust aż za bardzo. Mimo znacznej objętości, kilka wątków zostaje jakby pominiętych. Bardzo mało jest np. o zbrodniach rewolucjonistów, których Kapuściński popierał. Domosławski tłumaczy w duchu Kapuścińskiego, że największymi zbrodniarzami były autorytarne rządy wspierane przez Zachód. Takie wyjaśnienie jest równie poważne co "a u was murzynów biją!". Skoro zbrodnie były po obydwu stronach należałoby ocenić ich rozmiar. Rachunku zysków i strat jednak nie ma. Ba! Nie ma nawet wzmianki o egzekucjach osobiście dokonywanych przez jednego z bohaterów Kapuścińskiego - Che. Rozumiem jednak, że prawdopodobnie Domosławski a) zgadzał się z wizją świata Kapuścińskiego, b) nie chciał zamieniać książki o reporterze w dysputę polityczną. Nie dziwię się, że Domosławski mógł chcieć uniknąć pakowania się w tak drażliwy temat, ale mi osobiście zabrakło trochę rzeczowej analizy sytuacji, które Kapuściński opisywał przez pryzmat swoich marzeń i sentymentów. Momentami krytyka Kapuścińskiego jest rozwodniona. To znaczy, rzeczywiście została ona w książce zamieszczona, ale przeplata się z ogólnymi rozważaniami, które mają jakby osłabić siłę zarzutów. Przykładowo kiedy mowa o poprawianiu rzeczywistości, które uprawiał Kapuściński, porusza się też wątki w stylu "czy obiektywność w ogóle jest możliwa?" itd. Nie jest to moim zdaniem w 100% fair, choć powtarzam - nie jest też tak, że Kapuścińskiemu trochę się nie dostało. Po jakimś czasie książka zaczyna przybierać senne tempo i filozofujący nastrój a'la Kapuściński, którego ja osobiście nie trawię. Wolałbym trochę ostrzejsze pisarstwo, no ale trudno się dziwić, że autor wolał zamiast tego oddać hołd i powspominać człowieka, który był jego przyjacielem. Wahałem się trochę czy nie dać 4 gwiazdek, ale ostatecznie się na to nie zdecydowałem. 3+/5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bevan

    There is an enormous amount of information here, about Poland and what it meant to be a writer in a communist country in the 1950's and later. Nevertheless, I found this to be a very dispiriting book because of the hair-splitting questions raised about Kapuściński's political views, factual issues, and personality traits. Mr. Kapuściński was an imperfect man, but a remarkable reporter in a difficult time. The best antidote to this book is to read Kapuściński himself: The Soccer War is a stunning There is an enormous amount of information here, about Poland and what it meant to be a writer in a communist country in the 1950's and later. Nevertheless, I found this to be a very dispiriting book because of the hair-splitting questions raised about Kapuściński's political views, factual issues, and personality traits. Mr. Kapuściński was an imperfect man, but a remarkable reporter in a difficult time. The best antidote to this book is to read Kapuściński himself: The Soccer War is a stunning book, for instance, as is The Shadow of the Sun. His descriptions of Russia, in Imperium, are spine-tingling. His books have the power to transport you to fantastic, unimaginable places; his reportage was humanistic and unique. So, by all means, read this biography to understand his times, but read him to understand the man.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Moniii

    Genialna, 6/5 :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Dymond

    ‘I am living on a raft, in a side street in the merchant district of Accra . . .’ this is one of the most famous lines in Polish journalism - written by foreign correspondent Ryszard Kapuściński. Reporters from the old Soviet dominated Eastern bloc tend to be regarded contemptuously as propagandists by Western journalists. Not Kapuściński - whose books on the Iranian revolution (‘Shah of Shahs); the fall of Hailie Selassie (‘the Emperor’); and the fall of the Soviet empire itself ('Imperium') - ‘I am living on a raft, in a side street in the merchant district of Accra . . .’ this is one of the most famous lines in Polish journalism - written by foreign correspondent Ryszard Kapuściński. Reporters from the old Soviet dominated Eastern bloc tend to be regarded contemptuously as propagandists by Western journalists. Not Kapuściński - whose books on the Iranian revolution (‘Shah of Shahs); the fall of Hailie Selassie (‘the Emperor’); and the fall of the Soviet empire itself ('Imperium') - became go-to books to understand the intimate human story of revolt. Revolutions happen - according to Kapuściński, not over bread, but over wounded dignity. Artur Domoslawski’s biography is a comprehensive profile of Kapuściński, paying particular attention to his political outlook: a ‘third worldist’ socialism which he retained all his life. Domoslawski doesn’t spare Kapuściński a critical assessment though, in particular - Kapuściński’s flair for self-dramatising, and making highly subjective claims about his subjects that nobody else appears able to verify. However, as one of his admires says, Kapuściński ‘had an unusual talent for interpreting reality through the senses …. He had a perfect feel for the fates of ordinary people, he understood their world and was then able to describe it accurately, to tell their stories.’

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sean Mccarrey

    There were a few parts of this book that the author expounded upon too much, such as "The File," and other parts, such as Kapuscinski's actual travels, and experiences that were not addressed enough. Aside from that I found the book incredibly enlightening on the structure and styles of Kapuscinski's writings. I went into reading this book a bit afraid that it would be a Kapuscinski debunker. But Domoslawski's explanation of Kapuscinski's writing as a portrait of feeling rather than what many re There were a few parts of this book that the author expounded upon too much, such as "The File," and other parts, such as Kapuscinski's actual travels, and experiences that were not addressed enough. Aside from that I found the book incredibly enlightening on the structure and styles of Kapuscinski's writings. I went into reading this book a bit afraid that it would be a Kapuscinski debunker. But Domoslawski's explanation of Kapuscinski's writing as a portrait of feeling rather than what many readers might interpret as dishonesty, his explanation of the realities of Kapuscinski's involvement with the intelligence services, and the highlighting of Kapuscinski's ideology really made this book sing. I particularly bowled over by the unfinished books section. I would kill to read "In the Footsteps of Malinowski" as well as any of the untranslated books that Kapuscinski left behind. I should probably learn Polish so I can read what is left of this great man's work.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ania

    Dzisiaj skończyłam czytać to "wiekopomne dzieło". Nareszcie!!! Czytanie zajęło mi dużo czasu, bo dzieło jest nadzwyczaj opasłe, ponad sześćset stron łącznie z przypisami i bibliografią. Do tego dużo odniesień do tużpowojennego życia politycznego, a później do epoki Gomułki i Gierka, skrupulatne wyjaśnienia powiązań politycznych ówczesnej Polski. Trzeba się naprawdę mocno skupić, żeby wszystko dokładnie zrozumieć i usystematyzować w głowie. Trudne to było zwłaszcza dla mnie, osoby której dziecińs Dzisiaj skończyłam czytać to "wiekopomne dzieło". Nareszcie!!! Czytanie zajęło mi dużo czasu, bo dzieło jest nadzwyczaj opasłe, ponad sześćset stron łącznie z przypisami i bibliografią. Do tego dużo odniesień do tużpowojennego życia politycznego, a później do epoki Gomułki i Gierka, skrupulatne wyjaśnienia powiązań politycznych ówczesnej Polski. Trzeba się naprawdę mocno skupić, żeby wszystko dokładnie zrozumieć i usystematyzować w głowie. Trudne to było zwłaszcza dla mnie, osoby której dzieciństwo i młodość przypadają na czasy wolnej Polski. Pierwszy raz o tej biografii usłyszałam w programie Tomasza Lisa "Tomasz Lis na żywo". Książka wyszła w atmosferze skandalu obyczajowego. Autor ujawnił w niej romanse reportera, zwłaszcza jego długoletni pozamałżeński związek. Domosławski utrzymywał, że chciał odbrązowić i odczarować legendę wielkiego mistrza, przedstawić go ze wszystkimi zaletami i wadami, jako normalnego człowieka, takiego jak inni, zwykłego jak jego czytelnicy. Od początku czytania książki mam wrażenie, że Domosławski uważa Kapuścińskiego za oportunistę. Często wypomina mu, że umiał się ustawić. Miał bardzo dobre stosunki zarówno z władzą jak i z jej przeciwnikami. Zawsze wiedział do kogo z czym pójść, żeby uzyskać spodziewany efekt. Drugi zarzut autora, poparty bardzo dokładnym sprawdzaniem, to konfabulacja, skłonność do nieścisłości, mijania się z prawdą.Z tego zarzutu wypływa pytanie czy książki Kapuścińskiego to reportaże, literatura faktu, czy literatura piękna?. Domosławski ukazuje też stosunki rodzinne, relacje z żoną i konflikt z córką. Dużą część książki stanowią przedruki fragmentów najważniejszych dzieł pisarza i ich omówienie, wskazanie w jaki sposób powstały. Ponadto opisane są dokładnie wszystkie podróże reportażysty-globtrotera ze szczególnym wskazaniem, że podróżując chciał być najbliżej zwykłych ludzi i z ich perspektywy opisywać zachodzące w odwiedzanym kraju przemiany. Końcowe karty książki to opis życia reportera - teoretyka, relacje ze spotkań, odczytów, wystąpień, warsztatów dziennikarskich. Kilka stron autor poświęca na opisanie zmagań z coraz bardziej widoczną chorobą. Jest też rozdział poświęcony współpracy bohatera z wywiadem Polski Ludowej Książka mnie bardzo zmęczyła. Nie odbrązowiła i nie odczarowała mi postaci mistrza reportażu. Kapuściński zaczarował mnie już dawno, a dokładniej zaczarowały mnie jego książki. Czytając je nie zastanawiam się, czy jest to literatura piękna, reportaż, esej czy felieton. Czytam je jednym tchem. Malują przede mną obrazy, których prawdopodobnie nigdy, nie zobaczę na żywo. Otwierają mi oczy na problemy biedy, głodu, chorób i problemów życia codziennego w krajach Trzeciego Świata, mechanizmów władzy i upadku wielkich mocarstw. Nie interesuje mnie zbytnio, czy krocząc niebezpiecznymi szlakami został naprawdę zatrzymany przez strażników, czy nie. Czy ukrywając się leżał w dwumetrowej trawie, czy też trawa była metrowa. Jego książki to nie są depesze agencyjne, które zawsze pisał konkretne bez fantazjowania. Nie mam pewności czy Kapuściński to oportunista. Faktem jest, że potrafił się porozumieć prawie z każdym i w każdej sprawie. Dzięki temu mógł nawet w najgorszych czasach liczyć na otrzymanie paszportu, wizy, załatwienie wyjazdu i tym samym realizowanie swojej pasji. Gdyby nie to nie byłoby Ryszarda Kapuścińskiego reportera, ani Ryszarda Kapuścińskiego pisarza. Byłaby to z pewnością strata nie do odrobienia. Książkę powinni przeczytać wszyscy, którzy uznali polskiego reportażystę za tajnego współpracownika Służby Bezpieczeństwa. Zdziwiliby się niezmiernie, że w teczce niczego konkretnego nie ma, a to co jest nie może nikomu zaszkodzić. Może następnym razem wstrzymaliby się z pochopnym osądzaniem. Kapuściński nie miał dobrych stosunków ze swoją córką. Często się kłócili.Nie umieli ze sobą rozmawiać. Wbrew jego woli wyjechała do USA gdzie wyszła za mąż. Małżeństwo nie przetrwało długo. Córka jednak nie przyznała się otwarcie do porażki.W ramach buntu zmieniła nazwisko z Zofia Kapuścińska na Rene Maisner. Miała do ojca żal o ciągłe podróże i o to, że prawie nigdy nie było go w domu. żal ten jednak nie przeszkodził jej w dorosłym życiu egzystować na j koszt ojca i za jego pieniądze, które zarobił głównie dzięki tym właśnie podróżom. Po jego śmierci ochoczo korzystała z jego sławy. Odbierała nagrody za twórczość. Udzielała wywiadów, w których dowodziła jak jest z ojca dumna i jak się cieszyła, kiedy przywoził jej oryginalne prezenty z podróży. Jednak kiedy opowiadała o wystawie swoich kolaży ( jest artystką tworzy kolaże fotograficzno - malarskie), nie chciała wspominać o sławnym ojcu. Myślę, że w wypadku takich ludzi jak Ryszard Kapuściński zawsze jest "coś za coś", "coś kosztem czegoś". W jego przypadku realizacja pasji reporterskiej i ciągłe wyjazdy obywały się kosztem rodziny. Najbardziej zainteresowały mnie te fragmenty biografii, które mówiły o podróżach i o tym co kierowało dziennikarzem - korespondentem przy pisaniu kolejnych książek. Jak zbierał materiały, jak pracował tworząc coraz to nowe bestsellery. Biorąc pod uwagę, że: "jesteśmy tylko ludźmi, a nie aniołami" i pamiętając, że każdego człowieka trzeba cenić za dokonania, przyjmując jednocześnie jego niedoskonałości i wady zawsze będę uważała Ryszarda Kapuścińskiego za najwybitniejszego polskiego korespondenta i znawcę problematyki krajów afrykańskich. Należy oddać sprawiedliwość autorowi - Arturowi Domosławskiemu. Mimo, że nie ze wszystkim się zgadzam, doceniam jego wielką pracę i serce, jakie włożył w napisanie tej, niewątpliwie ważnej, książki o Wielkim Człowieku.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karolina Kołodziej

    One of the best books that I've read and in past years. Seems to be a result of a very honest and profound research. Shows rich historic background and reflects the diffucult choices of those who experienced the communism.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Texas

    Ksiazka bardzo dobrze napisana, ktora odslania ludzkie slabosci Kapuscinskiego, ale nie deprecjonuje jego legendy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Beata

    „Kapuściński. Non –fiction” Słyszałam wiele opinii na temat nieetycznego i wręcz podłego zachowania Domosławskiego w związku z książką o Kapuścińskim. Dlatego siedem lat temu, gdy książka wyszła na światło dzienne, nie przeczytałam jej. Uwierzyłam, że dawny przyjaciel słynnego reportera wykorzystał tę przyjaźń i skrzywdziła rodzinę, więc nie chciałam przykładać ręki do rzekomej zdrady. Jednak moja ciekawość, a przede wszystkim okazja (książka leżała na półce przyjaciółki) sprawiły, że sięgnęłam p „Kapuściński. Non –fiction” Słyszałam wiele opinii na temat nieetycznego i wręcz podłego zachowania Domosławskiego w związku z książką o Kapuścińskim. Dlatego siedem lat temu, gdy książka wyszła na światło dzienne, nie przeczytałam jej. Uwierzyłam, że dawny przyjaciel słynnego reportera wykorzystał tę przyjaźń i skrzywdziła rodzinę, więc nie chciałam przykładać ręki do rzekomej zdrady. Jednak moja ciekawość, a przede wszystkim okazja (książka leżała na półce przyjaciółki) sprawiły, że sięgnęłam po kontrowersyjną biografię. I nie żałuję. Przede wszystkim odniosłam ważenie, że Domosławski nie skupił się w książce na szukaniu sensacji i pomniejszaniu wizerunku wielkiego reportera. Kapu (bo tak skrócono trudne dla obcokrajowców nazwisko reportera) jest w książce potraktowany uczciwie, życzliwie, a przede wszystkim z wielką chęcią zrozumienia wybitnego dziennikarza. Domosławski raczej zadaje pytania, przytacza opinie przyjaciół, znajomych, współpracowników, pokazuje fakty - nie stara się oceniać. Wręcz pisze, że ocena postępowania człowieka, zwłaszcza w sytuacjach, których samemu nigdy się nie doświadczyło, jest niesprawiedliwa. Bo skąd wiemy, jak zachowalibyśmy się w czasach komuny, stalinizmu, podczas okupacji, w czasie długoletniego odosobnienia..., skoro większość z nas może sobie to jedynie wyobrazić. Łatwo jest teoretyzować, gdy nie jest się w skórze drugiego człowieka wraz z jego kompleksami (poczucie niższości osoby pochodzącej z prowincji), przeżyciami, lękami. Łatwo stawiać się w pozycji tego lepszego, szlachetniejszego, bardziej prawego. Na szczęście celem książki nie było dewastowanie pomnika wielkiego reportera, ale raczej chęć pokazania go jako człowieka z krwi i kości – z jego wspaniałościami i małościami. Być może po to, żeby lepiej móc zrozumieć jego drogę życiową i twórczą – czemu na szczęście poświecono najwięcej uwagi.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Davis

    A biography of the famous Polish journalist and writer provides us with an in-depth picture of the complex man. The committed communist in his youth, despite his childhood experiences of the Russian violence, he changes his stance with the birth of the Solidarity trade union. He remains on the left for the rest of his life but feels anxious and guilty when his contacts with the special services are revealed in the nineties. His writing talent demonstrated in his books does not seem to match his A biography of the famous Polish journalist and writer provides us with an in-depth picture of the complex man. The committed communist in his youth, despite his childhood experiences of the Russian violence, he changes his stance with the birth of the Solidarity trade union. He remains on the left for the rest of his life but feels anxious and guilty when his contacts with the special services are revealed in the nineties. His writing talent demonstrated in his books does not seem to match his real persona. He is also accused, rightly in my opinion, of using his poetic license to dramatize the various events reported in his books. Although this appears often to be done to enhance the clarity of his reportage technique, it could easily mislead a reader relying on its veracity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    jimmy

    Nie wychowałam się w kulcie Kapuścińskiego. Zawsze bardziej odpowiadał mi styl Wańkowicza, a upadek imperium radzieckiego lepiej przybliżył mi doskonały Tiziano Terzani. W Afryce byłam z najpierw Alfredem Szklarskim, potem Kazimierzem Nowakiem. Jednak Kapuściński reporter zawsze gdzieś fascynował, przewijał się, nie sposób było od niego uciec. Biografia Domosławskiego wciąga, reporterskie śledztwo jest skonstruowane precyzyjnie i doskonale. Autor poza tym nie wpada w pułapkę pozornego obiektywizm Nie wychowałam się w kulcie Kapuścińskiego. Zawsze bardziej odpowiadał mi styl Wańkowicza, a upadek imperium radzieckiego lepiej przybliżył mi doskonały Tiziano Terzani. W Afryce byłam z najpierw Alfredem Szklarskim, potem Kazimierzem Nowakiem. Jednak Kapuściński reporter zawsze gdzieś fascynował, przewijał się, nie sposób było od niego uciec. Biografia Domosławskiego wciąga, reporterskie śledztwo jest skonstruowane precyzyjnie i doskonale. Autor poza tym nie wpada w pułapkę pozornego obiektywizmu, lecz zarazem nie narzuca czytelnikowi interpretacji. Pozycja obowiązkowa dla każdego, kto interesuje się etyką dziennikarstwa oraz polską szkołą reportażu.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michal Wirkus

    Świetna biografia plus świetny przegląd przez dorobek Kapuścińskiego. Do polecenia nawet (a może szczególnie) tym, którzy RK do tej pory znają tylko ze słyszenia. Cała "kontrowersja" wokół książki została rozpętana przez idiotów, którzy nie przyjmują do wiadomości, że ci, którzy dorobili się pomników, też prowadzili normalne życie i też mieli prawo do swoich odpałów.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt Mayevsky

    An interesting study of Ryszard Kapuscinski's life and work. Study of legends - biography of man. The advantage of Domosławski's book is the filtering of Kapuscinski's character by the background of times, mainly of the Polish People's Republic; a great lesson in history. Besides, the author is not afraid to show that the king of reportage is sometimes naked.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nate Rabe

    I loved this biography. A sensitive, respectful (but not without criticisms) of one of the greatest non-fiction/reportage writers of the 20th century. If you like Kapuscinki's book you definitely should read this.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tomasz Boguszewicz

    Wspaniała książka. Czytana z dystansu siedem lat po kontrowersjach z czasu wydania. Książka zachęciła mnie do eksploracji Kapuścinskiego. Domosławski wykonał wspaniała robotę. Czyta się to fascynująco.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Felkner

    Świetnie napisana, pełna cytatów biografia, dzięki której można spojrzeć na twórczość Kapuścińskiego z szerszej perspektywy. Wbrew powszechnie panującym opiniom o tej pozycji, po lekturze czuję się jeszcze bardziej zachęcony do zapoznania się z kolejnymi książkami Kapuścińskiego.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Fulneczek

    O wiele za mało o reportażu. Niezła lekcja historii, rzetelna, ale nie tego w niej szukałem. Denerwujące wyciąganie wniosków z małych przesłanek co do motywacji Kapuścińskiego, mało twardych dowodów.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Ballin

    Really, this gets 3.5 stars. Kapuscinski was a remarkable figure - Poland's George Orwell and Bruce Chatwin rolled into one. This forensic autobiography reminds me if the brilliance oh his writing, and is particularly strong when it comes to painting a picture of how hard it was to be a writer of any integrity during the years of 'real socialism'. Though written by a friend of Kapuscinski, it pulls no punches about his many flaws: self-mythologising, male chauvinism, unwillingness to accept crit Really, this gets 3.5 stars. Kapuscinski was a remarkable figure - Poland's George Orwell and Bruce Chatwin rolled into one. This forensic autobiography reminds me if the brilliance oh his writing, and is particularly strong when it comes to painting a picture of how hard it was to be a writer of any integrity during the years of 'real socialism'. Though written by a friend of Kapuscinski, it pulls no punches about his many flaws: self-mythologising, male chauvinism, unwillingness to accept criticism. It also speaks eloquently of his charm, cleverness and significance as a writer who dared speak oblique truth to power (even while trying to make those power structures work for him). It made me want to read 'The Emperor' again, and dip a toe into some of the books which are less familiar here in the UK. It also reaffirmed my view of North-South as a key faultline in the contemporary world. When writing about such a gifted and often insightful writer, an autobiographer risks comparison, and unfortunately Domislawski's prose is sometimes a little stilted, and the book's structures sometimes feel a little awkward. How much of this is down to the translation, I do not know, but this does read like a translation: unlike those English language versions of Kapuscinski's books that I have read. It was worth reading, however: I felt I learnt something, and it serves as a good appetiser for Kapuscinski's own extraordinary work.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rafal Jasinski

    Bardzo dobra, sprawnie spisana biografia, której autor nie boi się poruszać tematów delikatnych a nawet tych, które rzucają niezbyt przychylne światło na sylwetkę reportera - porusza się jednak w tych "ciemnych" rejonach z wielkim taktem i finezją, nie feruje jednoznacznych wyroków i często analizuje problem spod różnych kątów widzenia. Najpiękniejsze w tej książce było dla mnie to, że po jej odłożeniu, miałem odczucie ukończenia długiej i pouczającej podróży, niejako obok człowieka, którego życi Bardzo dobra, sprawnie spisana biografia, której autor nie boi się poruszać tematów delikatnych a nawet tych, które rzucają niezbyt przychylne światło na sylwetkę reportera - porusza się jednak w tych "ciemnych" rejonach z wielkim taktem i finezją, nie feruje jednoznacznych wyroków i często analizuje problem spod różnych kątów widzenia. Najpiękniejsze w tej książce było dla mnie to, że po jej odłożeniu, miałem odczucie ukończenia długiej i pouczającej podróży, niejako obok człowieka, którego życie autor biografii tak znakomicie nakreślił - wraz z nim przeżywałem sukcesy i porażki, lęki i strach przed rzeczami ostatecznymi. I mimo, iż z rozpoczęciem lektury opinia moja o Kapuścińskim daleka była od pozytywnej, to wraz z jej ukończeniem, nie potrafię uczynić nic innego, niż pochylić z szacunkiem głowę przed tym wielkim człowiekiem.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mikolajl

    Za komuny otwarte krytykowanie władzy nie było tolerowane dlatego wypowiedzi często trzeba było zawoalować. Janusz Rewiński w skeczach kabaretowych przedstawiał na przykład absurdy panujące w RPA. W jednym z nich dyrektor "wezwał całą brygadę tej fabryki broni... bo co oni mogą tam robić w tych fabrykach? Nawet jak książki drukują to im ckm-y wychodzą, bandytom". Mam wrażenie, że obecnie jest podobnie. Za jakikolwiek tekst nie weźmie się dziennikarz Gazety Wyborczej to wychodzi mu o pogromach Żyd Za komuny otwarte krytykowanie władzy nie było tolerowane dlatego wypowiedzi często trzeba było zawoalować. Janusz Rewiński w skeczach kabaretowych przedstawiał na przykład absurdy panujące w RPA. W jednym z nich dyrektor "wezwał całą brygadę tej fabryki broni... bo co oni mogą tam robić w tych fabrykach? Nawet jak książki drukują to im ckm-y wychodzą, bandytom". Mam wrażenie, że obecnie jest podobnie. Za jakikolwiek tekst nie weźmie się dziennikarz Gazety Wyborczej to wychodzi mu o pogromach Żydów. Nie inaczej jest w tej książce, gdzie temat pogromu jest poruszony zanim jest mowa o głównym bohaterze... Zobaczymy co będzie dalej.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Casper

    Ik had dit boek al een á twee weken geleden definitief weggelegd. Toch wil ik er iets over schrijven. Toen deze biografie een paar jaar geleden uitkwam in Polen onstond er onmiddelijk grote controverse. Domosławski zou één van de grootste Poolse schrijvers, nog maar net dood en begraven, zomaar afgeserveerd hebben. Kapuściński had zowat alles in zijn boeken verzonnen! Interessant natuurlijk, dus het wachten was op de vertaling. Lees meer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rafal Szymczak

    A must-read for those, who stumbled upon at least one of Polish correspondent's books. It provides us not only with a portrait of a famous writer, but with an in-depth analysis of his workshop; gives a fresh viewpoint on his life in a non-fiction way, opposite to what might be expected from the author, close co-worker of Mr. Kapuscinski.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chuck

    A wonderful, honest, well researched, caring, and quality written bio of a great & human writer. Author does a very nice blend of history, perspective and real people. An excellent complement to book by Kapuscinski. Read it!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Slawek Pusz

    If you like Ryszard Kapuscinski's work you definitely have to read that book. It is objective life history of, in my opinion, the greatest Polish journalist which not only contains the best bits of him but also the dark sides. (read in Polish)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Bardzo dobra książka okołobiograficzna - ciężko określić ją jako biografię. Przedstawia fakty z życia Kapuścińskiego i ich powiązanie z jego książkami oraz jak postrzegali go jego bliscy, przyjaciele i znajomi.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Xroldx

    The biography on one of the most prolific journalists from Eastern Europe. But was he really a journalist? And in which ways was he involved with the Polish communist party? You can all find out in this thoroughly researched and well written biograpgy.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.