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The Hobbit: Graphic Novel

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First published over 50 years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Hobbit' has become one of the best-loved books of all time. Now Tolkien's fantasy classic has been adapted into a fully painted graphic novel. 'The Hobbit' is the story of Bilbo Baggins…a quiet and contented hobbit whose life is turned upside down when he joins the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves on their quest to First published over 50 years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Hobbit' has become one of the best-loved books of all time. Now Tolkien's fantasy classic has been adapted into a fully painted graphic novel. 'The Hobbit' is the story of Bilbo Baggins…a quiet and contented hobbit whose life is turned upside down when he joins the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves on their quest to reclaim the dwarves' stolen treasure. It is a journey fraught with danger – and in the end it is Bilbo alone who must face the guardian of this treasure, the most-dreaded dragon Smaug. Illustrated in full colour throughout, and accompanied by the carefully abridged text of the original novel, this handsome authorised edition will introduce new generations to a magical masterpiece – and be treasured by Hobbit fans of all ages, everywhere.


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First published over 50 years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Hobbit' has become one of the best-loved books of all time. Now Tolkien's fantasy classic has been adapted into a fully painted graphic novel. 'The Hobbit' is the story of Bilbo Baggins…a quiet and contented hobbit whose life is turned upside down when he joins the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves on their quest to First published over 50 years ago, J.R.R. Tolkien's 'The Hobbit' has become one of the best-loved books of all time. Now Tolkien's fantasy classic has been adapted into a fully painted graphic novel. 'The Hobbit' is the story of Bilbo Baggins…a quiet and contented hobbit whose life is turned upside down when he joins the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves on their quest to reclaim the dwarves' stolen treasure. It is a journey fraught with danger – and in the end it is Bilbo alone who must face the guardian of this treasure, the most-dreaded dragon Smaug. Illustrated in full colour throughout, and accompanied by the carefully abridged text of the original novel, this handsome authorised edition will introduce new generations to a magical masterpiece – and be treasured by Hobbit fans of all ages, everywhere.

30 review for The Hobbit: Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    When I picked this up I was not impressed. I took a fleeting look at the pages and saw artwork that was unglamorous; it was basic and unadorned. The story just looked like a simplified version of the original. So, I stuck it back on my shelf and there it remained for many months. I had not time for it. I didn't want time for it. I looked at it again recently. I then read it through and realised how perfect it is in its simplicity. I was so wrong the first time. I think the movie had altered my p When I picked this up I was not impressed. I took a fleeting look at the pages and saw artwork that was unglamorous; it was basic and unadorned. The story just looked like a simplified version of the original. So, I stuck it back on my shelf and there it remained for many months. I had not time for it. I didn't want time for it. I looked at it again recently. I then read it through and realised how perfect it is in its simplicity. I was so wrong the first time. I think the movie had altered my perceptions of what this should be like. The movie sacrificed the story for visual effects and action. This graphic novel, in retrospect, didn’t sacrifice anything. It has the essence of the story and the artwork is as it should be; it’s simple and not entirely serious. It's really quite charming in parts. The Artwork: The artwork in this is mainly consistent with the book. As much as I appreciate Martin Freeman’s version, he didn’t quite have the exact appearance of Bilbo. This is only a minor thing. But, in this, Bilbo is as fat and ugly as he should be. Hobbits aren’t supposed to be the most attractive of races. In this he is rendered well, as are the dwarves and Gandalf. My only issue on a character level is Smaug. He just seemed really awkward. In other depictions, such as Allan Lee’s, he is quite splendid and swift. In this he looks old, rusty, and to be quite frank, plump. He just didn’t look much like the mighty dragon that he is; yes, he is old; yes, he is has become lazy, but he shouldn’t look like his wings wouldn’t carry him. The real success here is the scenery. The Shire is luscious and simple; it is homely and basic. I think it’s illustrated perfectly with its wondrous shades of green. This may seem like a simple thing, but it really is a vital thing. It is the crux of the story; it is the anchor that embodies Tolkien’s idea of “a far greener country.” It had to be done right; it had to embody the simple, goodly and unrefined aspect of middle-earth. And it did. The Story: I’m not going into a great deal of detail here. I’d only be repeating myself. I think I said all I could in my full review of the actual novel. Here's the link in case anyone wants to read me praising the hell out of it: my review But, what I will say is that this brings the story to life. Well, that’s a bad phrase. Tolkien’s story is already alive when you read it. What I mean is that this presents it in a medium that allows you to physically see it rather than just visualise it. Is that better? No I think not. Let me try again: this provides illustrations to aid with an abridged version of the story; it enhances the experience, somewhat, because the artwork is so appropriate. The ending was what really mattered. It was Bilbo’s ending; it is not about the tragic death of a dwarf who went slightly mad, and then redeemed himself; it is not about a boatman who slayed a dragon, and became a renowned hero: it is about a Hobbit. This is Bilbo’s story and no others. It is a story about a fearful Hobbit found the courage to trick a dragon and save his friends. And that all that matters. This evoked the story much more than that heap of shit Peter Jackson shitted out last Christmas. This stayed true to its roots. And the game of riddles was even better. I do seriously recommend this to lovers of Tolkien’s wonderful novel.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Please note that this review is for a graphic adaptation of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. For my review of the original book, please link here: Jean's review This graphic adaptation of The Hobbit was first published in 1990. The artwork is by David Wenzel, and J.R.R. Tolkien’s story was abridged and adapted by Chuck Dixon. A new edition followed, for which David Wenzel made improvements and additions to the original edition, including a completely new cover design. Just as The Hobbit was an immedia Please note that this review is for a graphic adaptation of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. For my review of the original book, please link here: Jean's review This graphic adaptation of The Hobbit was first published in 1990. The artwork is by David Wenzel, and J.R.R. Tolkien’s story was abridged and adapted by Chuck Dixon. A new edition followed, for which David Wenzel made improvements and additions to the original edition, including a completely new cover design. Just as The Hobbit was an immediate success 80 years ago, so this adaptation has become one of the best-loved graphic novels of the last quarter of a century. It is a beautiful and worthy tribute to the classic story. Most people know the bare outline of the tale. The main character is Bilbo Baggins, a contented home-loving hobbit, who likes the quiet life. However, against his better judgement, he is tempted by the thought of an “adventure”. His life is then turned upside down when he joins the wizard Gandalf and a group of thirteen dwarves. He is employed by them as their “burglar”, when they go on a dangerous quest to reclaim their treasure which had been stolen long ago. Bilbo becomes increasingly involved, meeting with trolls, goblins and elves, and a strange slippery, amphibious creature who calls himself “Gollum”. Using his brains, and with several opportunities for inventing devious riddles, Bilbo eventually realises that it is up to him to enable the dwarves to achieve their long dream and reclaim their homeland. Alone he must face and outwit the monster who now guards the stolen hoard of treasure. And this monster is a much-feared dragon, the most dreaded in all Middle-earth, a worm called Smaug. There are so many fantasy elements, and such drama in this story that it is an illustrator’s dream. David Wenzel clearly has much respect for Tolkien’s story, and has hand painted his hundreds of illustrations in full colour throughout. They are beautiful and very painterly. Here is the cover illustration: And here is a link to the page on David Wenzel’s website with seven illustrations from this book: Link here If you click on each of the tiny thumbnails, you will see how he uses both muted and vibrant colour, and line, to create the effects he wishes. David Wenzel credits both Arthur Rackham and Edmund Dulac as two of his influences, and this is quite evident in his work. I particularly like the lush evocative illustrations of the Shire, and the atmospheric ones in the dragon’s cave. Most startling for me is the way David Wenzel has captured exactly what Bilbo looks like in my mind’s eye: a short dumpy male with a bit of a pot belly and plain, almost ugly features. He has a bulbous nose and a rubicund good-natured face. All the dwarves are well-drawn individuals and very convincing, as is Gollum, who is uncannily like the Gollum in the films. Smaug is a mean-looking and terrifying beast. It is perhaps as well to remember that this graphic novel was created a good decade before Peter Jackson’s first film of “The Lord of the Rings” and far, far before any of his films of The Hobbit. Yet there are several similarities. Both David Wenzel and Peter Jackson incorporated J.R.R. Tolkien’s maps, calligraphy and charts, for instance, hand drawn and coloured by the author himself. It is Tolkien who is responsible for the beautiful lettering and cartographic design, not any later artist. In a similar way, David Wenzel seems to have given a nod to Tolkien’s original water colours, in his choice of illustrative techniques and palette. The text by Chuck Dixon is also excellent and well matched. Although both David Wenzel and Chuck Dixon are American, the language used is English, and much of it is straight from Tolkien, especially the dialogue in the speech bubbles. The strip comments are long and extensive; this graphic novel takes a long time to read. Only once did I notice a mistake - and it was a humdinger! Near the beginning Gandalf says “gotten”. I can imagine the philologist and stickler for authenticity, Mr. J.R.R. Tolkien, would have blanched at that! There were a couple of instances where the American “o” instead of “ou” had crept in: for example using “vigor” instead of vigour, or “flavor” instead of flavour, but they were rare. And I particularly appreciated the precise use of punctuation, with inverted commas always correctly placed, and use being made of semi-colons. I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book, as I am not the target audience for graphic novels, and consequently not very easy to please. If you want to read a graphic adaptation of The Hobbit, then you need look no further. This is the one. It is hard to imagine how it could be bettered, within this format. And for that reason, I rate it a full five stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    2.5* - okay, the art in this is beautiful and very detailed, itself deserves 5 stars for sure. But this just couldn't do the original story justice. I get that you can't put all of the original text in a graphic novel, but everything felt soooo rushed and I don't think I would get it all if I haven't read the Hobbit.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Hobbit: Graphic Novel, Adapter: Chuck Dixon, Creator: J.R.R. Tolkien, Illustrator: David Wenzel, Adapter: Sean Deming

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Collins

    This was given to me by a friend for Christmas back in 92 it is wonderful ill version of The Hobbit very well adapted from Tolkien's book which I have read 10 times over last 40+ys .It can be hard to do justice to such a good book but this surprised me with its great art work it is Shame that the Sillmarlion or The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers or The Return of the King in separate volume have not been done As love see how the Ents came out.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mića

    Not like the book definitely but it's "an adventure" to travel with Bilbo in the illustrated story. Characters are not exactly how I imagined them the first time I read the book, yet anyway, it's a great graphic novel. For all Middle-Earth fans, do not have second thoughts! :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    John

    As a long time fan of Tolkien since I was a child (having even been a TA in a college-level Tolkien studies class), I'm always interested in how Tolkien is adapted. When I saw this graphic novel edition of the Hobbit, I was very curious as to how the story would play in the medium of the "comic". And I'm actually happy to say that the novel itself comes across really well. The story, characters and plot are all evenly handled. However, a fundmental problem with the medium of comic books would de As a long time fan of Tolkien since I was a child (having even been a TA in a college-level Tolkien studies class), I'm always interested in how Tolkien is adapted. When I saw this graphic novel edition of the Hobbit, I was very curious as to how the story would play in the medium of the "comic". And I'm actually happy to say that the novel itself comes across really well. The story, characters and plot are all evenly handled. However, a fundmental problem with the medium of comic books would definitely be visual approachability. In a less dense story, you could show the action in the graphics/drawings, and the dialogue in word form. But when there's a linear approach to a story's plot, the graphic medium may not be the best way to handle it...because I found the actual act of reading this book a bit frustrating...having to re-read panels over again because the flow of dialogue and action were a bit confusing (ie, do I read this bubble first? or that one? it seemed to change, depending on the layout. So, hence, minus one star. But other than that...the story has always been a lot of fun (riddles rule!). I don't think I have to praise the original any more than it already has been...but yeah, anyone who's a fan of fantasy loves it (hobbits, the dwarves, the wizard and dragons). In short, I've read the hobbit a handful of times...and as always, it feels like visiting an old friend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

    Thanks to Cory Anthony, reading the Hobbit became an annual autumn tradition. The kind of book you can read in a day but encapsulates some of the best sentiments of Thoreau, On The Road, and the kind of wonder that makes kids take off on bikes to explore the places beyond their hometown's city limits; to find Trolls frozen in stone, hidden and lost secrets in the deep woods waiting to be found, and new horizons yet to be discovered or imagined. A book to read as a kid, but hopefully one you'll n Thanks to Cory Anthony, reading the Hobbit became an annual autumn tradition. The kind of book you can read in a day but encapsulates some of the best sentiments of Thoreau, On The Road, and the kind of wonder that makes kids take off on bikes to explore the places beyond their hometown's city limits; to find Trolls frozen in stone, hidden and lost secrets in the deep woods waiting to be found, and new horizons yet to be discovered or imagined. A book to read as a kid, but hopefully one you'll never be too old to enjoy even wrapped up and warm in your own hobbit hole. And who knows, maybe it'll spark that old wanderlust. ..."Its a dangerous business going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet there's no knowing where you might be swept off to."...

  9. 5 out of 5

    logankstewart

    I picked this up on a Tolkien-high, interested in reading the graphic adaptation of the beloved novel it was based on. It had been a while since I read The Hobbit and had quite forgotten a few things, so I figured it was time to dive in. The biggest problem with this graphic novel is the amount of words per page. Comics almost never have multiple text boxes spread across a page, let alone a full novel's worth. Some pages were littered with these boxes, much to my annoyance. And some of these were I picked this up on a Tolkien-high, interested in reading the graphic adaptation of the beloved novel it was based on. It had been a while since I read The Hobbit and had quite forgotten a few things, so I figured it was time to dive in. The biggest problem with this graphic novel is the amount of words per page. Comics almost never have multiple text boxes spread across a page, let alone a full novel's worth. Some pages were littered with these boxes, much to my annoyance. And some of these were ridiculously long. I don't think this would have bothered me as much if it were Tolkien's words, but Dixon lacks the charm Tolkien had. On the other hand, the illustrations are beautiful. Water-colored works of art grace the reader's eyes, always magnificent to look at. Indeed, David Wenzel did an amazing job of drawing the scenes and crafting the characters. Gandalf is perfect, as are the Dwarves and Bilbo. Smaug is awesome (when are dragons not?). The Elves weren't how I imagined them, but still fit the overall stylistic themes of the book. Taking these two together, the graphic novel of The Hobbit in no way compares with Tolkien's masterpiece, but it's definitely worth the read. I wound up skipping large blocks of "narration" text, letting the individual comic panes and character dialogue instead fill in the story. It was nice going back to the beginning of the journey that inspires The Lord of the Rings, and Charles Dixon's The Hobbit mostly met my expectations. Recommended for those interested in Tolkien, especially younger readers, but I would first recommend reading the novel before this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This graphic novel sticks very close to Tolkien's text, even including much of the narration, which is nice, but means it's not really an adaptation, like I was sort of hoping. As it says on the cover, it's "an illustrated edition of the fantasy classic". It took me a little while to get used to the artwork, but I thought lots of it was very well done -- it fits the comic tone of The Hobbit a lot better than Alan Lee's epic artwork, even if I prefer Alan Lee as an artist.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Loederkoningin

    Major flashback to '89 thanks to an awesome dad.:)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A faithful rendition, though it naturally loses some of the richness of the book. Wenzel's artwork is certainly proficient, and I enjoyed the look of his watercolour technique but (you knew there was a but coming!) I was less enamoured of his characterisations. Bilbo looked a little too homely - perhaps an indication of my own prejudice in regard to what a 'heroic protagonist' should look like - the elves not ethereal or other-worldly enough. Gandalf and the dwarves were very good, though, and th A faithful rendition, though it naturally loses some of the richness of the book. Wenzel's artwork is certainly proficient, and I enjoyed the look of his watercolour technique but (you knew there was a but coming!) I was less enamoured of his characterisations. Bilbo looked a little too homely - perhaps an indication of my own prejudice in regard to what a 'heroic protagonist' should look like - the elves not ethereal or other-worldly enough. Gandalf and the dwarves were very good, though, and the illustration of Smaug on page 101 is magnificent. Despite my grumbles, this is a worthwhile adaptation and an enjoyable read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pau

    3/5 Hacía mucho tiempo que no leía un cómic y qué mejor que una adaptación de El hobbit para retomar la costumbre. De todas formas, me llevé una desilusión, esperaba mucho más. Las ilustraciones no me convencieron, me parecieron un poco cutres aunque el color las animaba un poco. Y la traducción es pésima...¿desde cuándo a los orcos se les llama trasgos? Además me parece que la historia está mal organizada, le dan mucha importancia (y muchas hojas) a detalles que no aportan nada a la historia y e 3/5 Hacía mucho tiempo que no leía un cómic y qué mejor que una adaptación de El hobbit para retomar la costumbre. De todas formas, me llevé una desilusión, esperaba mucho más. Las ilustraciones no me convencieron, me parecieron un poco cutres aunque el color las animaba un poco. Y la traducción es pésima...¿desde cuándo a los orcos se les llama trasgos? Además me parece que la historia está mal organizada, le dan mucha importancia (y muchas hojas) a detalles que no aportan nada a la historia y en cambio la Batalla de los Cinco Ejércitos se desarrolla en poco más de una página. Me parece que se podría haber repartido mucho mejor, aunque fuese añadiéndole páginas. Sin embargo yo tengo una debilidad por las historias de Tolkien y solo por eso y por las ilustraciones a doble página del final (que sí que merecen la pena), le pongo un 3 a esta adaptación que sin duda prefiero leer en boca del propio Tolkien.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    So, graphic novels seem to either tell the story through the art, tell it with good art and story, or go the route of this rendering of the Hobbit and tell it with a whole lotta words and art that seems a bit of an afterthought. Don’t get me wrong, when it comes to Tolkien, we all want the text-it’s great. And the art here is simple and doesn’t pull away from the story. At times it’s bit jumbled (when Bilbo initially gets separated from his dwarven companions in the mountain with the goblins) an So, graphic novels seem to either tell the story through the art, tell it with good art and story, or go the route of this rendering of the Hobbit and tell it with a whole lotta words and art that seems a bit of an afterthought. Don’t get me wrong, when it comes to Tolkien, we all want the text-it’s great. And the art here is simple and doesn’t pull away from the story. At times it’s bit jumbled (when Bilbo initially gets separated from his dwarven companions in the mountain with the goblins) and it certainly isn’t overly compelling, but it works. I’d like to see a version that has a more dramatic depiction such as the art by Donato Giancola who illustrated the cover of this edition. Still can’t beat this terrific tale.

  15. 4 out of 5

    أحمد

    قرأت الترجمة العربية للهوبيت من قبل وأحببت أن أقرأ هذه الرواية المصورة على سبيل المراجعة والاستمتاع بالرسوم. هذه أكثر رواية مصورة أخذت مني وقتًا في قراءتها رغم معرفتي بأحداثها. وهذا لأنها ليست "رواية مصورة" بقدر ما هي "الرواية مصورة"! فالرسوم هنا لا يكاد دورها يزيد عن لعب دور الخلفية لإعادة كتابة الرواية الأصلية كاملة. خط الكتابة صغير جدا حتى تكفي الصفحات لحشر كل التفاصيل حشرًا فوق الرسوم. استمتعت للغاية بلغة "تولكين" العظيمة التي استدرجتني الرواية المصورة لتذوقها وإدمانها. أحمد الديب أكتوبر 2015

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather Merrill

    I forgot to add this book; I read it recently because my boys were interested in it and I wanted to make sure it was not too complex or scary. I never read it as a child. I LOVED it! What a great story and well-written. My oldest son read it after me, and my second son is reading it now (as a matter of fact, as we speak!). They are begging to start the Lord of the Rings Trilogy next. Ordered the series in paperback yesterday . . . :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gilbert Patten-Elliott

    I decided to read this book because I wanted to read it before the movie came out but couldn't be bothered reading the real thing. After reading this I might actually read the real Hobbit novel. This book completed the graphic novel square on my bingo board. I usually enjoy reading graphic novels and this was no exception, even if it was a bit more complex than others I had read before. I thought this book had a great story and was pretty epic overall. I am really looking forward to when the movie I decided to read this book because I wanted to read it before the movie came out but couldn't be bothered reading the real thing. After reading this I might actually read the real Hobbit novel. This book completed the graphic novel square on my bingo board. I usually enjoy reading graphic novels and this was no exception, even if it was a bit more complex than others I had read before. I thought this book had a great story and was pretty epic overall. I am really looking forward to when the movie comes out. The illustrations were amazing and you could tell a lot of effort had been put in to make it. My favourite quote from the book is when Gollum says "What iss he, my preciouss?" I like this quote because I really like Gollum and it's always awesome when he says "my preciouss". From this book I learnt that The Hobbit isn't long and boring like others have told me, although this could be because they read the real book. A character in this book that is cool is Gollum because he is the most well created character ever.

  18. 5 out of 5

    02Hailey S Scharf

    The hobbit is a good book with a lot of description, some humor, good information, and not much rambling off. The book gets to the point and doesn't often waste time telling you something that doesn't relate to the book. It describes feelings of characters in great detail so you can really feel and imagine what they did. Not only all of what I mentioned but this book so far is great, but it also says kind things to people. When they said: "There is more in you of good than you know, child of the The hobbit is a good book with a lot of description, some humor, good information, and not much rambling off. The book gets to the point and doesn't often waste time telling you something that doesn't relate to the book. It describes feelings of characters in great detail so you can really feel and imagine what they did. Not only all of what I mentioned but this book so far is great, but it also says kind things to people. When they said: "There is more in you of good than you know, child of the kindly West." And when he said: "Let's have no more argument. I have chosen Mr. Baggins and that ought to be enough for all of you". That took us straight to the point instead of wasting time rambling on about something that in all essence doesn't matter. When they said: "He felt a different person and much fiercer in spite of an empty stomach as he wiped his sword and put it back in his sheath". The emotion could be felt. It is obvious he had a more intense feeling of preparedness to fight! This book also has a lot of other good stuff too, like the battle of five armies or when he fought with the dragon! It gets intense! There are a few negative qualities about this book. In some parts it gets too descriptive and it seems like the narrator talks forever, describing to the extent that it feels like there isn't an end to the words! The characters are very honest with each other, but sometimes it just doesn't matter and wastes time. When the narrator said, "Dwarves are not heroes, but calculating folk with a great idea of valuing money," it was pointless and had no pertinence to the story. Sure, it tells you information about the Dwarves and was semi-apologetic for what was previously said, but as the reader it just doesn't matter. Sometimes, the book is just spread out too far. When they said, "The most that can be said for the dwarves is this: that they intended to pay Bilbo really handsomely for his services; they had brought him to do a nasty job for them, and they did not mind the poor little fellow doing it if he would..." They could have made that same sentence but with more pertinence to the story. It has a few words that are confusing and it takes a while to understand. While reading the book I wondered, "What does Gandalf look like?" or "Why is it so hard to find Rivendell? This is going on forever.” Well, explained later in the story Gandalf is tall compared to the hobbits of course. He also has a long white beard. It took so long to find Rivendell because the path they were following had been marked where to go, but it was hard to see because moss had grown over the path and covered the marks. Over all I think this is a great book. From the evidence presented above, this book is excellent and there are only a few things to dislike. I liked this book because, it was easy to understand and wrap my mind around. It gets a little dragged out at times, but for the most part this book was great and I would recommend it to anyone with some free time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Heather Stewart Graphic Novel This version of the popular novel was very accurate to the original. The graphics were absolutely amazing and very colorful. They really brought the story to life. It tells the tale of Bilbo Baggins and his adventure to the Lonely Mountain with a group of dwarves. On the trip he finds himself lost in a cave where he meets Gollum and finds the ring. The rest of the tale tells of Bilbo’s cunning to rescue the dwarves from captivity and lead them to the mountain to slay Heather Stewart Graphic Novel This version of the popular novel was very accurate to the original. The graphics were absolutely amazing and very colorful. They really brought the story to life. It tells the tale of Bilbo Baggins and his adventure to the Lonely Mountain with a group of dwarves. On the trip he finds himself lost in a cave where he meets Gollum and finds the ring. The rest of the tale tells of Bilbo’s cunning to rescue the dwarves from captivity and lead them to the mountain to slay the dragon Smaug and reclaim their rightful treasure. By using the ring to disappear he is able to infiltrate the dragon’s lair and find its weakness. The dwarves are able to return to the mines of the mountain that their ancestors once dwelled in and Bilbo returns to his hole in the hill.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dimitra

    This is a classic that I read recently (as a novel) and I fell in love with it, instantly! When I saw the graphic novel I knew I HAD TO READ IT TOO!!! It was amazing! Beautiful artwork, with lines from the original book itself. I think it is great for any kid who hates reading but loves comics and graphic novels. THIS will get them into reading actual books, trust me! I think that this is the second book (first is Harry Potter, obviously...) that I'm going to flip through whenever I feel bad, just to This is a classic that I read recently (as a novel) and I fell in love with it, instantly! When I saw the graphic novel I knew I HAD TO READ IT TOO!!! It was amazing! Beautiful artwork, with lines from the original book itself. I think it is great for any kid who hates reading but loves comics and graphic novels. THIS will get them into reading actual books, trust me! I think that this is the second book (first is Harry Potter, obviously...) that I'm going to flip through whenever I feel bad, just to comfort myself, relax and smile...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juan Carlos

    Maravillosa adaptación a comic de ésta gran obra de Tolkien. Chuck Dixon mantiene el espíritu del autor original con diálogos y narración exactos, que junto al precioso dibujo en acuarela de David Wenzel, nos invitan a formar parte de ésta increíble aventura de Bilbo Bolsón, Gandalf y los enanos para recuperar el tesoro del malvado dragón Smaug en la Montaña Solitaria, con la fuerza de las imágenes. Imprescindible para fans de la Tierra Media.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alec Longstreth

    I read this comics adaptation a bunch as a reluctant teen reader. As a comic, it is very text-heavy, with almost a paragraph of narration (carefully abridged from the original book) for each panel. It would have been nice to have twice as many pages to make it more readable and to improve the flow, but the reader is lucky to have even this many pages! Each page is masterfully crafted by David Wenzel. His ink and watercolor illustration perfectly brings to life the fantastical subject matter!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    This was an okay read. I liked this better than the original novel as I found that the art added a lot to the story. The drawings were beautiful. I did get a bit bored about halfway through, just like when I read the original.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Freya

    I originally read the Hobbit when I was 11 in my English lessons which was great as I had already been a fan of Lord of the Rings for a couple of years, so I was very excited to spot this in a charity shop! As I have been exposed to Peter Jackson's film creations for the formative years of my child/teenhood and spoilt by John Howe and Alan Lee's artwork, I did find the depictions of the characters a little difficult to get behind initially as I have a strong image in my mind already - but it was I originally read the Hobbit when I was 11 in my English lessons which was great as I had already been a fan of Lord of the Rings for a couple of years, so I was very excited to spot this in a charity shop! As I have been exposed to Peter Jackson's film creations for the formative years of my child/teenhood and spoilt by John Howe and Alan Lee's artwork, I did find the depictions of the characters a little difficult to get behind initially as I have a strong image in my mind already - but it was good to go back to the text and see how the artist had drawn their view of Middle Earth from Tolkien's story. As someone who on occasion dibble dabbles with paints and pencils (I'm not very good), I could really appreciate just how beautiful the artwork is and spent some time closely examining pages to see how elements were drawn. My only criticism of this graphic novel is that the whole book is extremely detailed and then it skims over the battle really quickly... I confess I will need to go back and read the battle of five armies part in the Hobbit to see if it is really that short - but my memories of the book have it as longer so near the end it felt a little as if it had run out of puff. But other than that, a great read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ben Spring

    The Hobbit is a medieval fantasy story about a little hobbit(small Halfling) named Bilbo goes on an adventure with 13 dwarfs and the mighty wizard Gandalf. They travel through caves full of goblins, elf towns, towns of men and dark forests infested with spiders. The dwarfs are on a mission to get their home mountain filled with gold and jewels back from a greedy dragon, but they encounter many difficulties on the way slowing their long journey even more. When the finally reach the mountain the w The Hobbit is a medieval fantasy story about a little hobbit(small Halfling) named Bilbo goes on an adventure with 13 dwarfs and the mighty wizard Gandalf. They travel through caves full of goblins, elf towns, towns of men and dark forests infested with spiders. The dwarfs are on a mission to get their home mountain filled with gold and jewels back from a greedy dragon, but they encounter many difficulties on the way slowing their long journey even more. When the finally reach the mountain the wake the dragon, who then destroys lake town, one of the archers kills the dragon. The men demand some of the dwarfs gold, they refuse and hold their ground in the mountain. the goblins had heard the death of the dragon and wanted the gold. The men, elf's and dwarfs work together to kill the goblin army. The dwarfs return to their mountain once and for all. I rate the hobbit 5 out of 5 stars because it is very enjoyable and fun to read. The graphic novel version has very good pictures which add to the already amazing storyline. The hobbit is a book I think everyone should read and that everyone will enjoy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    An adaptation that is very true to the original. Very. This is a great companion to Tolkien's novel, and the art is as atmospheric as you would expect. It's been a while since Middle Earth looked this good. That said, don't expect Alan Lee or John Howe - The Hobbit doesn't have quite the same epic, or dark, overtones as The Lord of the Rings. Recommended.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eyehavenofilter

    The little guy with big hairy feet goes on an adventure with creatures that have nads of excessive weight, and gets nads of his own. He traverses the world he knows to parts yet unknown, gets lost in an underworld of sorts, matches wits with the witless, and keeps a precious, endless, golden secret. He overcomes minions, and saves the ones who tease him and finds his place in the scheme of things. He overcomes amazing obstacles, and diligence his small size vanquishes the enemy. Life is an amazi The little guy with big hairy feet goes on an adventure with creatures that have nads of excessive weight, and gets nads of his own. He traverses the world he knows to parts yet unknown, gets lost in an underworld of sorts, matches wits with the witless, and keeps a precious, endless, golden secret. He overcomes minions, and saves the ones who tease him and finds his place in the scheme of things. He overcomes amazing obstacles, and diligence his small size vanquishes the enemy. Life is an amazing thing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nurse Lisa In Ohio (PRN Book Reviews)

    The 4/5 star rating is based on my feeling that "the Hobbit" as a story is a five. However, I wasn't super crazy about this particular representation/presentation of the timeless Tolkein masterpiece. Hence the knock down to 4. I'm sure most of us hardcore Hobbit/LOTR fans will appreciate this format, to some degree, but NOTHING beats the original imho.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Logan Nance

    I really liked this book, I thought it was one of the better fictional books that I have read. I actually went and saw the movie not to long ago, it ran right alongside the story line. I would definitely recommend this book to the people that may have not of read it yet. This is a great book with some really interesting parts, I think it is a must read book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    "The Hobbit or There and Back Again" is the first story of Middle-Earth that was ever read by the masses. And to this day it remains a beloved favorite due to Tolkien's exceptional writing, realistic and lovable characters, and the fantastic, complicated world with its unlikely hero: a fuzzy-footed hobbit. Bilbo Baggins lives a pleasantly stodgy and dull life in the Shire, in a luxurious hole under a hill. ("It was a hobbit hole, and that means comfort") But his life is completely turned upside-d "The Hobbit or There and Back Again" is the first story of Middle-Earth that was ever read by the masses. And to this day it remains a beloved favorite due to Tolkien's exceptional writing, realistic and lovable characters, and the fantastic, complicated world with its unlikely hero: a fuzzy-footed hobbit. Bilbo Baggins lives a pleasantly stodgy and dull life in the Shire, in a luxurious hole under a hill. ("It was a hobbit hole, and that means comfort") But his life is completely turned upside-down by the arrival of the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves. The dwarves, led by the exiled king-in-waiting Thorin Oakenshield, want to regain the Lonely Mountain (and a lot of treasure) from the dragon Smaug, who drove out the dwarves long ago. Why do they want Bilbo? Because Gandalf has told them that he'd make a good burglar (even though Bilbo has never burgled in his life). So before Bilbo is entirely sure what is going on, he is being swept off on a very unrespectable -- and dangerous -- adventure. Bilbo and the Dwarves battle goblins and spiders, are nearly eaten twice, are captured and Bilbo is forced to riddle with the treacherous, withered Gollum, and ends up escaping with a magical Ring. But even after these obstacles, the dragon Smaug is still in the Lonely Mountain, and Bilbo is not entirely sure what to do to deal with this enemy. Author J.R.R. Tolkien had been crafting his mythos of Elves, Dwarves, Wizards and Men for years before writing "The Hobbit," but "The Hobbit" is the first story that people had the opportunity to read. It began as a line scrawled on a sheet of blank paper, and then into a bedtime story for his children. And even though it's overshadowed by "Lord of the Rings" and "Silmarillion," this book is an essential link. It's definitely sillier and lighter, but it provides the springboard for a lot of the stuff in "Lord of the Rings" -- especially the magical Ring that Bilbo finds in Gollum's cavern. The concept of hobbits started in this book -- the quintessential peaceful "wee" people, based on British countryfolk, with simple pleasures and unexpected depths of strength and resourcefulness. And, of course, fuzz on their large feet. Tolkien's Elves are a little more ethereal and less dignified, and his dwarves are a bit more comical and less grim. But Elrond hints at the full majesty of the Elves, and Thorin Oakenshield is still the most dignified, proud and impressively flawed dwarf there is. The last chapters of the book hint at the epic majesty of "Lord of the Rings," and some of the same victory/loss themes. And of course, the idea that even little people -- like a hobbit or a bird -- can change the world. Tolkien's writing is quick and light, while providing sufficient detail to let you picture what's going on. The dialogue is less influenced by Old English, and the pace is a lot faster (not surprising, since it was originally read to his kids before bedtime). Bilbo is a likable little guy -- he seems to be the last person whom you'd expect to be a courageous hero, but he shows incredibly strength and smarts when he's under pressure. Supporting characters like Thorin, Bard the Guardsman-turned-King, the king of the wood-elves, and even Smaug himself are never cookie-cutter, but multidimensional and immensely interesting to read about. really awesome book, i really enjoyed it

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