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Foundation and Chaos

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A major science fiction author continues one of the most famous SF stories of all time.


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A major science fiction author continues one of the most famous SF stories of all time.

30 review for Foundation and Chaos

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah Johnson

    I almost gave this two stars until I realized how utterly pointless the book was. Nothing in the story advances the plot of the Foundation Series until the last 10 pages or so. The "sims" were (thankfully) largely downplayed after their disastrous introduction in Foundation's Fear. There was no VR immersion nonsense either. It also wasn't nearly as long (albeit still 350 pages or so too long in my opinion...). So in these regards, it was not as bad as Fear was. But, there were robots. Tons and ton I almost gave this two stars until I realized how utterly pointless the book was. Nothing in the story advances the plot of the Foundation Series until the last 10 pages or so. The "sims" were (thankfully) largely downplayed after their disastrous introduction in Foundation's Fear. There was no VR immersion nonsense either. It also wasn't nearly as long (albeit still 350 pages or so too long in my opinion...). So in these regards, it was not as bad as Fear was. But, there were robots. Tons and tons of robots for no reason other than to fight with each other for some reason. Daneel is back, and changed for the worse. In previous books, Asimov stated how it was very hard for Daneel to manipulate someone's mind even a small amount. In this book he is having entire conversations with people just to erase their memory of it when he is done. Why?? Asimov would be rolling over in his grave if he realized how his legacy was tainted by his greedy survivors.

  2. 4 out of 5

    C. Conner

    This book is annoying on many levels: Overall thoughts - this was not a journey where the reader is carried along by a quest and comes to a resolution by the end. This was a "glad it's over" story. A book should be a collection of words greater than the sum of the total. Foundation and Chaos was the opposite. Asimov gives the sensation of a rich and vast universe with his Foundation series. With this book the words are there but the meaning is lost and the reader is left looking through a small p This book is annoying on many levels: Overall thoughts - this was not a journey where the reader is carried along by a quest and comes to a resolution by the end. This was a "glad it's over" story. A book should be a collection of words greater than the sum of the total. Foundation and Chaos was the opposite. Asimov gives the sensation of a rich and vast universe with his Foundation series. With this book the words are there but the meaning is lost and the reader is left looking through a small peephole with no understanding of what is happening. The characters were one dimensional and there were no clear antagonists. Those who were seemed to vacillate between motives. What I found particularly disturbing was that everyone in this book seemed to know the purpose of robots and that robots were trying to steer humanity along a path. This premise does not conform with the way Asimov wrote his series. Robots had, by design, fallen out of the collective conscious of humanity. And at the climax of the story multiple characters were able to break into an Imperial government building with ease. I find this very implausible and believe the author either didn't care or ran out of time to be thorough. With an author of this reputation one would think grammar, punctuation and word meaning would not be an issue. This was not the case. There were multiple minor annoyances that added up to make this a bad book: The author had a penchant for ending paragraphs using ellipsis. The author should have reviewed the use of ellipsis and when to add an additional period. For some reason he liked to use the word "ceil" in place of "ceiling." Note to author - "ceil" is a verb. He also used "mathist" in place of "mathematician." And the names he came up with for ships: "Flower of Evil" and "Spear of Glory." Come on! It seems to me he spent maybe five minutes thinking of names or else put on a blindfold and threw darts at a board filled with random words. One of my favorite weird names he came up with was "Crib of the Accused." WTH? And there was also his use of parenthesis inside a quotation. The author should review the proper use of parenthesis. Which brings me to his phrase "keeping literally tens of millions of balls in the air at once..." That was another favorite. To author - please review the use of "literal" versus "figurative." One of the other words that left me shaking my head was "ignoramus." Who uses that word? I would not recommend this book to anyone. I believe you should respect the original author if you are going to "go into his house." Don't go in and start moving around everything and changing the furniture. This book does just that and fails miserably at continuing the universe that Asimov created.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Shrugged

    I finished reading "Foundation and Chaos" by Greg Bear. This is an authorized part of the Asimov Foundation series . Once again we get into the details, filling out the story about how the Foundation got started. The original series started off rather abruptly with a new character, placed on trial and an older character that seems to know what is going on. The judgement is exile and suddenly you are on another planet, wondering how it all happened. Foundation and Chaos provides that information, I finished reading "Foundation and Chaos" by Greg Bear. This is an authorized part of the Asimov Foundation series . Once again we get into the details, filling out the story about how the Foundation got started. The original series started off rather abruptly with a new character, placed on trial and an older character that seems to know what is going on. The judgement is exile and suddenly you are on another planet, wondering how it all happened. Foundation and Chaos provides that information, outlining the trial and a lot of the back story of the characters who were only names in the book "Foundation". I liked the book. This is a different author and I think he did an able job. Lots of excitement even though I know how it will turn out in the end. Getting there is half the fun and he provides that fun including tying up some of the sadder aspects of the story and smoothing them out. I was gratified. The book also suggested how the main "bad guy" in the original Foundation series might have come about. There is one more novel in this particular set... Foundation's Triumph. Each of the novels stands alone, I am told. Certainly I could have read these first two in opposite order without too much of a problem.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Smaniam

    I read the Foundation Series as a teenager and with "Foundation and Earth" I thought there could be nothing more that could be achieved beyond that book. So, when I came across the books that were published ostensibly as an authorised extension to the foundation saga - It was something amounting to sacrilege!! I could barely control myself whenever I caught a glimpse of any of the pretenders. It was like Mammon had won the battle and Asimov's legacy would soon be muddled. Well, time does mellow o I read the Foundation Series as a teenager and with "Foundation and Earth" I thought there could be nothing more that could be achieved beyond that book. So, when I came across the books that were published ostensibly as an authorised extension to the foundation saga - It was something amounting to sacrilege!! I could barely control myself whenever I caught a glimpse of any of the pretenders. It was like Mammon had won the battle and Asimov's legacy would soon be muddled. Well, time does mellow ones feelings and also introduces newer perspectives. Messrs Bear, Grin and Benford have done a commendable job in trying to add a bit of Science to what was essentially a 1950s plot to make it palatable for contemporary hard sci-fi readers. I would recommend that this series should be read separately after completing a reading of the original series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daniel McGill

    Does some damage control on what Benford did to the series in the first book before it gets going but I'd give this series a pass unless you're a fanatical completionist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Roddy Williams

    ‘In ‘Foundation and Chaos’, one of science fiction’s greatest storytellers takes one of its greatest stories into new and fascinating territory. Isaac Asimov’s classic Foundation series is back. Hari Seldon, approaching the end of his life, is on trial for daring to predict the Empire’s fall. At the same time, final preparations are under way for the long-anticipated migration to Star’s End. But R Daneel Olivaw, the brilliant robot entrusted with this great mission, has discovered a potential en ‘In ‘Foundation and Chaos’, one of science fiction’s greatest storytellers takes one of its greatest stories into new and fascinating territory. Isaac Asimov’s classic Foundation series is back. Hari Seldon, approaching the end of his life, is on trial for daring to predict the Empire’s fall. At the same time, final preparations are under way for the long-anticipated migration to Star’s End. But R Daneel Olivaw, the brilliant robot entrusted with this great mission, has discovered a potential enemy. At a critical moment in the Empire’s fall and the Foundation’s rise, Hari Seldon is about to face the greatest challenge of his life. Blurb to the 2001 Orbit Paperback Edition The novel runs concurrently with Part I of Asimov’s original novel, cleverly using Hari Seldon’s trial – originally seen from the viewpoint of Gaal Dornick – as a central focus to examine events behind the scenes of which Gaal Dornick was unaware. The trial dialogue is identical, but Asimov’s rather dry ‘transcript’ version has been dramatised – if one may use that word in this context – brilliantly and, if anything, creates a tension and suspense where in Asimov’s version of events there is merely his cosy sense of certainty and destiny. The reader was never in any doubt that the Seldon plan would succeed. It was just a matter of trying to work out how. Behind the scenes, Hari’s grand-daughter, Wanda, is gathering ‘mentalics’ – human mutants capable of manipulating the thoughts of others – as the core of Seldon’s ‘Second’ Foundation. Bear’s Foundation universe is a darker and more complex place than Benford’s, and it is to his credit that he manages to capture some of Asimov’s atmosphere whilst fully updating it for a contemporary readership. Here, the robots take centre-stage and their millennia-spanning plans and behind-the scenes manipulations are put into a different perspective. Lodovic Trema, an ancient robot and long-time associate of Daneel R Olivaw’s plans for humanity, has been altered by Voltaire (an AI personality first encountered in Foundation’s Fear). He no longer is bound by Asimov’s Three Laws of Robotics which forbid him to harm humans, and undergoes a form of robotic exegesis, coming to believe that Daneel’s protective stance of humanity as a whole is a restrictive suffocating policy. The robots’ disparate philosophies and organisations are described using religious terminology with Humanity in the position of God/Creator. Originally united, the robot population was divided and subdivided by schisms, with some becoming Calvinist (after Susan Calvin from Asimov’s original ‘Robot’ series) and others becoming Giskardists following the philosophy of the robot R Giskard Reventlov. To add support to the religious connection there is a conversation between Daneel and the sim personality construct of Joan of Arc in which it is implied that Daneel’s God is Humanity, which in a sense is true if one applies the human religious hierarchical framework to Robots. Humans are the creators. They breathed life into the robots in a far more evidential way manner than God breathed life into Adam. Oddly enough, the robot featured in Asimov’s ‘I, Robot’ or at least in the twilight Zone adaptation, was indeed called ‘Adam’, thus endowing the whole of this robotic narrative thread with a kind of theological thematic consistency. This means that the evolved humans now having abandoned their Gods, it is time for the Robots to do the same. Were this not a posthumous sequel with a solid body of work stretching back – with various degrees of quality – to the Nineteen Forties, the concept of a robot in the late Nineties novel would only work in some ironic post-modern sense, as it does in ‘Roderick’. The concept of a Galactic Empire is also one which modern writers approach at their peril, but here, given its cosy familiarity from the Asimov legacy seems – along with the robots – not out of place. Bear, following on from Benford, fleshes out the power-structures and goes a long way toward making the Empire, and the complex power struggles which pervade it, a plausible entity. It’s fascinating to see how Bear, noted for novels of solid scientific speculation and Big Ideas, copes with what is essentially Space Opera, but cope he does, and extraordinarily well. One of the best scenes involves two of the robots travelling to the secret robot base at Eos, a small blue moon of a green gas giant, orbiting a double star. There, an ancient robot with four arms, three legs and seven vertical sensor strips on its face ‘two of which glowed blue at any given time’ performs necessary maintenance on those robots who come in for their MOTs. It’s a poignant and evocative section, laced with a Golden Age sense of wonder.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eoghann Irving

    Foundation and Chaos is book two of the Second Foundation Trilogy is rather different to book one. For a start Bear sticks more faithfully to the Foundation universe as described by Asimov. How important that is will vary depending on the reader. More importantly, the plot of this book feels more cohesive, resulting in a more entertaining read. The Second Foundation Trilogy covers the life of Hari Seldon, his invention of psychohistory and his setting up of the two Foundations. This particular bo Foundation and Chaos is book two of the Second Foundation Trilogy is rather different to book one. For a start Bear sticks more faithfully to the Foundation universe as described by Asimov. How important that is will vary depending on the reader. More importantly, the plot of this book feels more cohesive, resulting in a more entertaining read. The Second Foundation Trilogy covers the life of Hari Seldon, his invention of psychohistory and his setting up of the two Foundations. This particular book concentrates on the period of his life when he was put on trial by the crumbling Empire. Although Hari Seldon is the main character of the trilogy (and thus this particular book) large parts of it are witnessed through the eyes of other characters. This is both interesting and frustrating at the same time. On the one hand we get to explore Trantor from various perspectives. On the other, I found Seldon to be one of the most interesting characters and wanted to spend more time in his head. There is an overarching plot to this trilogy, the exact nature of which is not clear yet. In the first book, there were sections which seemed totally irrelevant to the main thrust of the book. During this book, the various strands become rather more entwined. Even so the significance is not at all clear. Plotwise, perhaps the most significant change from book one to book two is the portrayal of R Daneel Olivaw. In this book he seems less human. A not unnatural condition for a robot as old as he is by this point. His obsession with “protecting” the human race while still genuine goodwill on his part, seems less healthy now and maybe counterproductive. He also seems a little too free at manipulating people. As I mentioned this book is more faithful to the Foundation Universe. No more wormholes, we’re back to hyperships again. This book reads and feels more like an Asimov Foundation story. The themes are very much those which Asimov used throughout his Foundation writing too. Unfortunately there is still something missing. The book is well written, the characters interesting and the setting well developed. Its good, its just not quite Foundation.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is such a super rubbish book. I am actually very disappointed I read it. Some reviews of post-Asimov Foundation said that Fear was so rubbish that it’s best just to skip to this one so I did. But it was a mistake to bother with this at all. If anything it has tainted my lasting images of Asimov's wonderful time-spanning saga. Daneel is much crueler in this than in any Asimov story, he's ruthless and really is laid out as a blight on humanity. Brain-fever to make mankind less innovative and This is such a super rubbish book. I am actually very disappointed I read it. Some reviews of post-Asimov Foundation said that Fear was so rubbish that it’s best just to skip to this one so I did. But it was a mistake to bother with this at all. If anything it has tainted my lasting images of Asimov's wonderful time-spanning saga. Daneel is much crueler in this than in any Asimov story, he's ruthless and really is laid out as a blight on humanity. Brain-fever to make mankind less innovative and thus less troublesome to control? Are you kidding me? This is all just so bad. So many pointless robots and other new useless constructs. Asimov would be gutted, I'm gutted. Once you've read Asimov's work on this series, consider it as over, that's it, let it go, don't be tempted to read this. Seriously.

  9. 4 out of 5

    manuti

    Siguiendo con la trilogía incluida en la lista de libros de 2008 – 2009. Después del anterior, este continúa las aventuras del matemático Hari Seldon. Si del anterior dije que era un poco space opera, este es algo más, y en general entra en una serie de historias con los robots (una constante de Asimov) que me ha gustado menos que el anterior, por lo que se queda con solo 2 estrellas.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phil Giunta

    I completed Foundation and Chaos in a few weeks, reading mostly in the late evening or in stolen minutes during weekends. By contrast, I took months to finish the first entry in this trilogy, Foundation's Fear by Gregory Benford. Benford's plodding, tedious pacing and fragmented plot did not inspire confidence in the rest of the series but Greg Bear turned that around. I was eager to return to Foundation and Chaos everyday and for as long as possible. Well conceived plot, excellent pacing, and s I completed Foundation and Chaos in a few weeks, reading mostly in the late evening or in stolen minutes during weekends. By contrast, I took months to finish the first entry in this trilogy, Foundation's Fear by Gregory Benford. Benford's plodding, tedious pacing and fragmented plot did not inspire confidence in the rest of the series but Greg Bear turned that around. I was eager to return to Foundation and Chaos everyday and for as long as possible. Well conceived plot, excellent pacing, and strong character development. Bear tackled the robots of Asimov's Galactic Empire head on, while minimizing Benford's influence from the first entry. I'm eager to begin Foundation's Triumph by David Brin.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Starting in the middle of a series is a crazy idea but read the book. You in a world of low intelligent thanks to a disease that kills any child of high intelligent. One of the main character Klis suffered as a child. Lucky for the robots she and a boy called Brann survived this. The robots they to get these two to help the change of the world. The story is deep and philosophy like. A bit too deep to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Liedzeit

    Liest sich ganz nett, aber ist doch ohne den Asimov drive. Tatsächlich könnte der Meister ihn selbst geschrieben haben, wenn sein Stil sich weiter verflacht hätte. Es geht um einen Roboter, der gar nicht mehr an die Gesetze gebunden ist, und mit eigenem Gewissen erkennt, dass das Nullte Gesetz die Menschen entmündigt und böse ist. Das immerhin sehr gut. 5/10

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Now, I'm not going to say that this series is as ground-breaking as Asimov's (puhlease), but I do highly recommend that all the haters go back and read some of the originals and reassess how they feel about these authors matching (or not matching) Asimov's "voice." Having recently read the entire original series, I'm pretty amazed at how these books fall right in line.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    3.5* Lots of interesting aspects of the story. For some reason, just couldn't connect with the characters. Maybe it was because there were too many interesting characters? I was just left with the feeling that I had watched something very interesting and was hoping for more?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rob Markley

    I really had high hopes of what Bear could bring to Asimov. I like Bear the more but I regret that I feel instead of lifting Foundation Bear was dragged down from his lofty and brilliant science based fiction

  16. 5 out of 5

    Naman Srivastava

    Awesome read! Loved the way the book is integrated to the ones that came before in the series. Just like the others in this series, amazing how the multiple story lines merge together.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Stager

    Enjoyable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    .

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Page

    This is the second Foundation based book I read. After this I read the original Foundation trilogy. In a way I am glad I read this first because it helped built up the story of Hari Seldon, and this book ends in the perfect place for the original Foundation trilogy to pick up. In my opinion you can skip Foundation's Triumph, and probably Foundation's Fear as well as neither are that great. Of the second Foundation trilogy this volume was by far the best, I found the story interesting and it kept This is the second Foundation based book I read. After this I read the original Foundation trilogy. In a way I am glad I read this first because it helped built up the story of Hari Seldon, and this book ends in the perfect place for the original Foundation trilogy to pick up. In my opinion you can skip Foundation's Triumph, and probably Foundation's Fear as well as neither are that great. Of the second Foundation trilogy this volume was by far the best, I found the story interesting and it kept me wanting to read a little further.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Compared with the novel that came before in this series, this one was phenomenal! Foundation and Chaos: The Second Foundation Trilogy is clearly a secondary book in a trilogy. It advances the story arc and sets up the crisis to be resolved in the third novel, without actually answering many questions itself. This novel was a faster read than Foundation's Fear (Second Foundation Trilogy, #1), and seemed to dovetail very nicely with the initial vignette in Foundation. I was thrilled to see Dors back Compared with the novel that came before in this series, this one was phenomenal! Foundation and Chaos: The Second Foundation Trilogy is clearly a secondary book in a trilogy. It advances the story arc and sets up the crisis to be resolved in the third novel, without actually answering many questions itself. This novel was a faster read than Foundation's Fear (Second Foundation Trilogy, #1), and seemed to dovetail very nicely with the initial vignette in Foundation. I was thrilled to see Dors back (I like/d her), but equally annoyed to see the return of Joan and Voltaire. My reading notes follow: (view spoiler)[@ 2.7% // Well look at that! Raych is mentioned right at the start of this novel. Unlike the previous novel, he is remembered to exist! @ 3.3% // So long, and thanks for all the worm holes. The worm holes, a rare science accuracy in a world of space fiction (often called science fiction) of the previous novel has just been killed off in order to return to Asimov's hyper drive ships. To those reviewers that found worm holes anti-cannon and unpalatable when reading the previous novel, this point in this novel must have been a wonder to behold. Are they jumping for joy? @ 5.3% // Loving the subtle nod to Planck. @ 7.5% // Stimulk is the new Popsicle... @ 10.7% // ... if Popsicles were beer. @ 16.9% // Science fiction science jargon at its best. About the only part of that currently related to science is the assertion that Sodium chloride is table salt. @ 16.9% // What on Earth is a "weighted balcony"? @ 17.0% // Widdershins! Someone actually used "widdershins" in their manuscript! Love! @ 57.8% // I had so sincerely hoped that all that nonsense with Joan and Voltaire was just limited to the first of this new trilogy. But alas, no. And honestly, what does it matter that those SIMs have quarreled? @ 59.1% // And just who, exactly, is it that you believe us a robot that you are saving "us" from the servitude of, Sinter? Seldon? The Emperor? Chen? @ 60.7% // Wait a minute! How did Klia et al discover that they were working for robots? I feel as if I missed a scene. At last telling, they just knew that they were working for mysterious individuals. But robots? They know this now? Biggest secret in the universe and it seems that everyone knows it. @ 66.2% // “That is not a surprise,” Plussix said with a soft internal whir. “A copy of the sim Voltaire exists in Plussix and me, as well.” Editing faux pas? Since Plussix is the one talking "Plussix and me" makes no sense. @ 88.4% // So Seldon has had his crisis of conscious and wants to scrap the entirety of the Foundation project. But since this is a prequel and we know that he does not, let's see how he changes his mind in the next 12% of the novel. Or is that what the next book is for? (hide spoiler)]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    So far, I think Greg Bear is my favorite author out of the entire Foundation series. Gregory Benford was definitely a step in the right direction with his characterization skills, but Bear takes that same skill and adds a prevailing plot that keeps the story moving along. It still gets bogged down with a lot of details, but overall, I think he brings the best combination of talents to bear with this novel. This novel is a direct continuation, thematically, to Foundation's Fear (the story's chrono So far, I think Greg Bear is my favorite author out of the entire Foundation series. Gregory Benford was definitely a step in the right direction with his characterization skills, but Bear takes that same skill and adds a prevailing plot that keeps the story moving along. It still gets bogged down with a lot of details, but overall, I think he brings the best combination of talents to bear with this novel. This novel is a direct continuation, thematically, to Foundation's Fear (the story's chronology takes place a couple of decades after the events in that novel), and focuses more on how the robots play into the entire series. It helps alleviate some of the surprise I felt with the preceding novel, since I felt like the robots were over-represented, when Asimov had made them a rather understated element of the series, despite them being the reason the Foundation existed at all. But this trilogy appears to be an examination of the robots and their role in those events, which makes the series feel a little more significant. I still have trouble accepting the idea that the events of over 20,000 years of history were all part of a grand plan set in place so long ago. It's not a criticism of the books or the series; I'm just not comfortable with the idea that individuals aren't all that important in the grand scheme of things. Life already reminds us that our existence is fleeting, and that we may not be as significant as we think we are; I don't want my fiction having to remind me of that fact, as well. I read to escape, not to be reminded of my ultimate futility. One aspect of the book that I initially disliked was the rehashing of the trial that began this series some 70 years ago. At first, I thought it was a way to pad out the book, but as the trial continued, I realized that we were seeing more of what was going on behind that trial. Asimov's version moved quickly and clinically, focusing more on the elements of psychohistory than the people behind it; Bear delved into the people behind the trial, focusing on Seldon, Dornick, and other characters who weren't even mentioned in that initial story. It cemented the trial and made it more real, and I realized that this "rehash" was more necessary than I first realized. I find it odd to consider that the book's theme reinforces the idea of the futility of an individual in the history of the world, while the focus of the story itself is on the individuals. I'm not sure if it's meant to be reassuring, or if it's just irony, but either way it made the book more readable for me. With this book complete, I have one last volume to read to be done with Foundation for good (save for the Robot series, which is still up in the air with me). I don't see it as a series that I would want to read again in the future, but I'm glad that I've made it this far. It felt like one of those series that I needed to read, and I'm glad to say that I have.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Roger Verstraete

    Characters: R. Daneel Olivaw: Leader of the Giskardian robots. Hari Seldon: Mathist. Founder of psychohistory. Also known as Raven becuase of his forecast of the fall of the Empire. Linge Chen: Chief commissioner of Public Safety. i.e. the military leader of the Empire. Wanda Seldon Palver: Granddaughter of Hari Seldon. Wife of Stettin Palver. Dors Venabili: The Tiger woman. Hari's wife while he was first minister. Died protecting him from an assassination attempt. Kallusin: Man in green. Leader of th Characters: R. Daneel Olivaw: Leader of the Giskardian robots. Hari Seldon: Mathist. Founder of psychohistory. Also known as Raven becuase of his forecast of the fall of the Empire. Linge Chen: Chief commissioner of Public Safety. i.e. the military leader of the Empire. Wanda Seldon Palver: Granddaughter of Hari Seldon. Wife of Stettin Palver. Dors Venabili: The Tiger woman. Hari's wife while he was first minister. Died protecting him from an assassination attempt. Kallusin: Man in green. Leader of the Calvinian robots on Trantor. Dahlite: Add a description of this character. Brann: Big brawny man. A mentalic, his power is making people like him. Klayus: Emperor of the empire. Vara Liso: Mentalic recruited by Wanda but refused instead went to work for Farad Sinter. Plussix: Calvinian robot. Not humaniform. Undercover as an importer. Cleon: Former emporor, had Demerzel (a.k.a. Daneel) as first minister. Predecessor of Agis. General Prothon: Led Cleon into exile. Demerzel: Alias of Daneel Olivaw. Demerzel was first minister to Cleon. Gaal Domick: Mathist. To become the fifty-first mathist to join the foundation project. Brought to trial with Hari Seldon. Klia Asgar: Dahliite mentalic with strong powers of persuasion. Tritch: Captian of three ships including Flower of Evil. The ship that searched for Lodovik Trema. Joan: meme entity. Based on Joan of Arc. Sedjar Boon: Hari Seldon's attorney. R Yan Kansarv: Robot repairman. Built Eos station with Daneel. Lodovik Trema: Robot. Trusted councilor of Linge Chen. Trin: Crewwoman on the flower of evil. Kreen: Linge Chen's personal secretary. Captain Kartas Tolk: captain of the Spear of Glory. Native Sarossan. Farad Sinter: first minister to the emperor. Mors Planch: More than an expert on hyperdrives. Sondon Asgar: Father of Klia Major Perl Namm: Special investigations assigned to the Dahlite sector. He took Vara Liso on her sweeps to find mentalics and later robots. Lors Avakim: young lawyer. Hired for Gaal Doornick. Prospective member of the encyclopedia project. Gerad Mint: Commander in palace security. Rock: human recruited by Kallisun. Agis: Emperor after Cleon and before Klayus. Nikolo Pas: Tyrant. Butcher of 50 billions people. Brought to Trantor so that he could be interviewed by Hari Seldon.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Loyd

    Foundation and Chaos (1998) 402 pages by Greg Bear. Foundation, Foundation and Empire, and Second Foundation is the classic Foundation Trilogy written by Isaac Asimov in the early 1950's. Much later Asimov connected the Foundation universe with his robot universe. Given those elements, Gregory Benford, Bear and David Brin wrote a trilogy of novels focusing on Hari Seldon. In the second of those books Bear is at a point where Linge Chen, chief commissioner of public safety, has brought charges of Foundation and Chaos (1998) 402 pages by Greg Bear. Foundation, Foundation and Empire, and Second Foundation is the classic Foundation Trilogy written by Isaac Asimov in the early 1950's. Much later Asimov connected the Foundation universe with his robot universe. Given those elements, Gregory Benford, Bear and David Brin wrote a trilogy of novels focusing on Hari Seldon. In the second of those books Bear is at a point where Linge Chen, chief commissioner of public safety, has brought charges of treason against Hari Seldon. Hari is awaiting trial. Meanwhile Farad Sinter with the help of Vara Liso is trying to first locate other mentalics, and later on robots. Robots have formed two factions. Giskardian robots that have developed a zeroth law of robotics which is to guard humanity as whole and the Calvinians, named for Susan Calvin, who stick to the more rigid three laws. Since this is a prequel to Foundation the reason for reading it is to be interested in the characters and the explanation of how it came to be. Lodovik Trema is Linge Chen's trusted advisor, but is really a plant by Daneel Olivaw. Trema trying on his way to save people and knowledge on a world near a super nova is caught by the neutrino flux and stranded. Chen gets Mors Planch to look for Trema. Planch finds Trema, but reports him dead to Chen and instead delivers him to Daneel. Sinter catches Planch and learns of Lodovik Trema's survival and goes on a hunt for robots. Klia Asgar who has evaded capture by Vara Liso and Sinter is low enough on resources that she accepts an offer of protection from the man in green. The man in green turns out to be Kallisun the leader of the Calvinian robots. There is enough going on to keep the reader interested and not so much that it becomes too complex. The book can be read standalone. It has not stopped at a cliff hanger, and I only have vague recollections of the Foundation stories and Benford's Foundation's Fear that preceded this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    La verdad es que lo terminé en parte porque no me gusta dejar libros sin terminar, en parte porque siempre guardo la "esperanza" de encontrar esa parte del libro que me mueva el piso. Bueno, como dicen en inglés, long story short, no encontré esa parte. Se puso "bien" interesante recién cerca del final: ahí pasaron muchas cosas, toda la trama empezó a agilizarse. Me pareció que muchas ideas eran reiterativas: meritocracia, robots controladores, meritocracia en dos párrafos seguidos, robots contr La verdad es que lo terminé en parte porque no me gusta dejar libros sin terminar, en parte porque siempre guardo la "esperanza" de encontrar esa parte del libro que me mueva el piso. Bueno, como dicen en inglés, long story short, no encontré esa parte. Se puso "bien" interesante recién cerca del final: ahí pasaron muchas cosas, toda la trama empezó a agilizarse. Me pareció que muchas ideas eran reiterativas: meritocracia, robots controladores, meritocracia en dos párrafos seguidos, robots controladores, poder, meritocracia poderosa... Una cosa es desarrollar un tema de interés particular por el autor a lo largo de la historia, plantear esas situaciones; otra es sólo nombrar los conceptos. Por otro lado está el hecho de que no leí la saga original, ni el libro previo, por lo que no sé cuán conectado o no está con anteriores historias. Me gustaría leer la original, para ver de dónde vienen las cosas, sólo espero que no esté escrita en el mismo tono. El estilo de descripción de los personajes usado no es la que más me gusta (no sabría describirla tampoco, no cuando tengo ganas de escribir rápido, y tengo que irme a estudiar). En fin, me entretuve pero hasta ahí nomás.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Dachsel

    #2 of the Second Foundation Trilogy is definitely better than #1 (which was very tedious). It gives a lot of background, not all of it is necessary, but some of it is somewhat interesting. The massive infusion of robots combined with the contribution of the mentalics made the story rather complicated, as two warring factions of robots play a substantial role. As I have not read Asimov's earlier novels on the robots, I have no idea whether all of this was fabricated by Mr. Bear or not. As another #2 of the Second Foundation Trilogy is definitely better than #1 (which was very tedious). It gives a lot of background, not all of it is necessary, but some of it is somewhat interesting. The massive infusion of robots combined with the contribution of the mentalics made the story rather complicated, as two warring factions of robots play a substantial role. As I have not read Asimov's earlier novels on the robots, I have no idea whether all of this was fabricated by Mr. Bear or not. As another reviewer put it, the sims play a much less important role here as opposed to #1, which is a huge plus. The book got stronger as the plot progressed, and the last third was a really good read. The culmination put the mentalics to the foreground of the action, and their confrontation with the robots was somewhat convoluted. Some of the scenes at the very end are very strong, though, and definitely justify reading this volume. Now I'm looking forward to reading #3 (Triumph) which is said to be the best of the Second Foundation Trilogy. So far I can say that #3 is an almost seamless continuation of #2.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kip

    Got these three (Second Foundation Trilogy) from a friend. Been a long time since I read the Foundation or robot stories from Asimov, so I was eager to jump back into the story. All three authors did a good job remaining true to the original timelines, major events and characters. That said, you could tell this was sort of filler. Should have expected that, right? Has motivated me to go back and read some of the robot stories again -- lots of robot activity in all three of these. * Couldn't finish * Got these three (Second Foundation Trilogy) from a friend. Been a long time since I read the Foundation or robot stories from Asimov, so I was eager to jump back into the story. All three authors did a good job remaining true to the original timelines, major events and characters. That said, you could tell this was sort of filler. Should have expected that, right? Has motivated me to go back and read some of the robot stories again -- lots of robot activity in all three of these. * Couldn't finish ** I had nothing else to do *** Passed the time, would be **** for genre / author fans **** Everyone could enjoy this book ***** Everyone should read this book, I'll read it again

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zoltán

    Minden tekintetben meghaladja a Gregory Benford jegyezte Az Alapítvány félelme c. regényt. Greg Bear története nemcsak tartalmi-logikai és stilisztikai szempontból illeszkedik sallangmentesen Asimov univerzumába, hanem a benfordi szálakat is sikerrel fűzi össze az Alapítvány epizódjaival – egy nem éppen könnyű feladat. Nyilván, az Alapítvány és a Robotok univerzum szakértő olvasói kimazsolázhatnak egy-két következetlenséget, lelhetnek néhány pontot, ahol Bear sztorija apró karcot ejt az asimovi Minden tekintetben meghaladja a Gregory Benford jegyezte Az Alapítvány félelme c. regényt. Greg Bear története nemcsak tartalmi-logikai és stilisztikai szempontból illeszkedik sallangmentesen Asimov univerzumába, hanem a benfordi szálakat is sikerrel fűzi össze az Alapítvány epizódjaival – egy nem éppen könnyű feladat. Nyilván, az Alapítvány és a Robotok univerzum szakértő olvasói kimazsolázhatnak egy-két következetlenséget, lelhetnek néhány pontot, ahol Bear sztorija apró karcot ejt az asimovi regényfolyamon (bár ilyen súrlódások az eredeti asimovi novellák között is kimutathatók, amint arra maga a szerző is rámutatott), de ezek egyike sem csökkenti érdemben a befogadói élvezetet, sőt…

  28. 4 out of 5

    David

    Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Well, this was definitely better than Benford's entry in the Foundation series in that at no point while reading this did I want to gouge my eyes out. However, I can't really say it was a good or necessary part of the Foundation saga. I wouldn't call it a complete waste of time (again, unlike Foundation's Fear)...but I was pretty glad to finish it. I did gain a healthy respect for Bear's writing (he's one of my wife's favorites) and am interested in reading something e Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Well, this was definitely better than Benford's entry in the Foundation series in that at no point while reading this did I want to gouge my eyes out. However, I can't really say it was a good or necessary part of the Foundation saga. I wouldn't call it a complete waste of time (again, unlike Foundation's Fear)...but I was pretty glad to finish it. I did gain a healthy respect for Bear's writing (he's one of my wife's favorites) and am interested in reading something else. I just hope it has more of a plot than this had.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Szymon Myalski

    This book was an interesting one for me. It finds many loose ends in robots and foundation series and tight them together, telling stories that were either reason or result for different events in the series. And it take place in time frame of the beginning of "Foundation" book, but focusing on the story from different point of view. Deja-vu. But even without such references it is a good book, with a few interesting characters and some important questions to ask. I really enjoy it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thuong

    Bear did a fantastic job to "continue" the Foundation serie with a missing prequel. The many parallel threads resemble the well-known structure of the original Foundation books. Even the narrative style and the twist till the end is surprisingly similar to Asimov's one as if the old master had written them himself. To the core an successful prequel even though sometimes I miss the what-if mindgame of Asimov so dearly.

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