kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Furnace: A Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

Timely and heartfelt, Rollins’ graphic novel debut The Furnace is a literary science fiction glimpse into our future, in the vein of mainstream successes for fans of Black Mirror and The Twilight Zone One decision. Thousands of lives ruined. Can someone ever repent for the sins of their past? When Professor Walton Honderich was a young grad student, he participated in a gove Timely and heartfelt, Rollins’ graphic novel debut The Furnace is a literary science fiction glimpse into our future, in the vein of mainstream successes for fans of Black Mirror and The Twilight Zone One decision. Thousands of lives ruined. Can someone ever repent for the sins of their past? When Professor Walton Honderich was a young grad student, he participated in a government prison program and committed an act that led to the death of his friend, the brilliant physicist Marc Lepore, and resulted in unimaginable torment for an entire class of people across the United States. Twenty years later, now an insecure father slipping into alcoholism, Walton struggles against the ghosts that haunt him in a futuristic New York City. With full-color art and a dark, compelling work of psychological suspense and a cutting-edge critique of our increasingly technological world, The Furnace speaks fluently to the terrifying scope of the surveillance state, the dangerous allure of legacy, and the hope of redemption despite our flaws. “Surreal and evocative, The Furnace is a great critique of technology and the human condition.” —John Jennings, illustrator for the New York Times #1 bestseller Octavia Butler’s Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Timely and heartfelt, Rollins’ graphic novel debut The Furnace is a literary science fiction glimpse into our future, in the vein of mainstream successes for fans of Black Mirror and The Twilight Zone One decision. Thousands of lives ruined. Can someone ever repent for the sins of their past? When Professor Walton Honderich was a young grad student, he participated in a gove Timely and heartfelt, Rollins’ graphic novel debut The Furnace is a literary science fiction glimpse into our future, in the vein of mainstream successes for fans of Black Mirror and The Twilight Zone One decision. Thousands of lives ruined. Can someone ever repent for the sins of their past? When Professor Walton Honderich was a young grad student, he participated in a government prison program and committed an act that led to the death of his friend, the brilliant physicist Marc Lepore, and resulted in unimaginable torment for an entire class of people across the United States. Twenty years later, now an insecure father slipping into alcoholism, Walton struggles against the ghosts that haunt him in a futuristic New York City. With full-color art and a dark, compelling work of psychological suspense and a cutting-edge critique of our increasingly technological world, The Furnace speaks fluently to the terrifying scope of the surveillance state, the dangerous allure of legacy, and the hope of redemption despite our flaws. “Surreal and evocative, The Furnace is a great critique of technology and the human condition.” —John Jennings, illustrator for the New York Times #1 bestseller Octavia Butler’s Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

30 review for The Furnace: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I was able to read an excerpt of a section of background narrative detailing a piece of technology that would create mobile prisons. A device that would hover over a the convict and make him/her invisible to people. Speculative fiction and technology at it’s best. Art work was dark and created great atmosphere for the science. I would love to get my hands on the full novel. Looks very good. I give this title a three only because it is a ‘Maybe’ until I could see the whole thing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    Sci-Fi story about the implications of a high-tech prisoner management technique. Instead of keeping them in expensive prisons where they can sometimes cause riots, etc., they are put under the charge of a floating metal sphere which creates an invisibility shield around them. The prisoner can then walk about freely in the world, but nobody can see or hear him. Any attempt he makes to escape or touch another person results in painful punishment. So while he is able to experience the world, he is Sci-Fi story about the implications of a high-tech prisoner management technique. Instead of keeping them in expensive prisons where they can sometimes cause riots, etc., they are put under the charge of a floating metal sphere which creates an invisibility shield around them. The prisoner can then walk about freely in the world, but nobody can see or hear him. Any attempt he makes to escape or touch another person results in painful punishment. So while he is able to experience the world, he is still in solitary confinement. Forever. What would that do to a person? What would the guilt do to the people who created it? The graphics are lovely and detailed, with subdued colors. An excerpt is available on the Tor.com website. Oh how I love little free libraries! There are many, many of them in my town and I often stop to check to see what's inside. I love the randomness of finding books this way. I'd never heard of Prentis Rollins or this book, but it looked interesting, and it is! And I got it a month before it will even be put on sale. Now I'll spread the love by offering it to members of my comics reading group or putting it into another little free box.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cathy (cathepsut)

    I read a 16 page excerpt of this comic and have to say that it didn‘t do anything for me. Based on the excerpt I have no interest in reading the full story. The art was ok, but didn‘t grab me. And there was too little of the story to make an impact. Something about mobile prisons? Vaguely SF. Something horrible happens and bad choices are made? Sorry, too short to form a decent opinion. I received this free e-copy from the publisher/author via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review, thank you I read a 16 page excerpt of this comic and have to say that it didn‘t do anything for me. Based on the excerpt I have no interest in reading the full story. The art was ok, but didn‘t grab me. And there was too little of the story to make an impact. Something about mobile prisons? Vaguely SF. Something horrible happens and bad choices are made? Sorry, too short to form a decent opinion. I received this free e-copy from the publisher/author via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review, thank you!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt Graupman

    “The Furnace,” the debut graphic novel by comics veteran Prentis Rollins, is as unsettling as it is plausible, which is to say very. In the not-too-distant future, the government enacts a cost-saving program to replace traditional prisons: convicts are allowed in public but only when accompanied by GARDs, spherical drones that hover behind their target (thus preventing them from ever seeing it) which constantly monitor the prisoner while rendering them invisible to the general public. It’s not m “The Furnace,” the debut graphic novel by comics veteran Prentis Rollins, is as unsettling as it is plausible, which is to say very. In the not-too-distant future, the government enacts a cost-saving program to replace traditional prisons: convicts are allowed in public but only when accompanied by GARDs, spherical drones that hover behind their target (thus preventing them from ever seeing it) which constantly monitor the prisoner while rendering them invisible to the general public. It’s not much of a stretch to imagine such a program actually existing in real life so it’s incredibly unnerving when the drones begin to behave in unexpected ways, bringing up issues of privacy and technological ethics that, in the present digital landscape of Cambridge Analytica and data-mining and whatnot, are more important than ever. Don’t get me wrong, “The Furnace” is a gripping, entertaining comic, but it definitely hits way too close to home. The protagonist - if you can call him that - of “The Furnace” is Walton Honderich, a idealistic physicist who, as a young man, helped his mentor, Marc Lepore, beta test the GARD software and, in the process, unwittingly certified the whole program for implementation. Decades later, guilt-ridden and frequently drunk, Honderich recounts his misdeeds to his young daughter, revealing just how complicit he was in the ill-fated program. It’s part “Black Mirror”-style techno-cautionary tale, part Jeff Lemire-y confessional drama, and part sci-fi thriller. Now that I think about it a bit more, in tone, style, and presentation, “The Furnace” is quite similar to “Watchmen,” Alan Moore’s classic redefinition of superhero comics; Rollins’ art is hyper-detailed in an Art Adams-y kind of way, but otherwise it has the same nihilistic charm, subdued coloring, and moralistic dilemmas. It’s not a perfect graphic novel by any means - sometimes it can be a little heavy-handed and the pacing is a bit wonky at times - but I thought it was an excellent slice of near-future science fiction. Like I said, “The Furnace” feels like a lost “Black Mirror” episode but it also has a really nice throwback quality to it; the story feels simultaneously topical and timeless. And who knows? With the speed of technology nowadays, it’s central predicament may someday soon feel quaintly naive. Awesome graphic novel today, real life nightmare tomorrow?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    The more I think about this book, the more annoyed I get. The premise is interesting- small probes are assigned to maximum security prisoners to eliminate the need for the prison, with the catch being that they render the prisoner invisible and mute all sound from them. But the ethical implications are muddled by the intrusion of the ridiculously boring woe-is-me crappy father plotline, in which the protagonist moans about being a shithead to his wife. I guess it's supposed to inject humanity in The more I think about this book, the more annoyed I get. The premise is interesting- small probes are assigned to maximum security prisoners to eliminate the need for the prison, with the catch being that they render the prisoner invisible and mute all sound from them. But the ethical implications are muddled by the intrusion of the ridiculously boring woe-is-me crappy father plotline, in which the protagonist moans about being a shithead to his wife. I guess it's supposed to inject humanity into him, but all it does is create a weak framing story and detract from the actual plot. Also the ending is a big load of nothing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    In the near future, prisons are no longer a preferable option to incarcerating criminals, so the American government looks to the latest advances in technology for a solution. Walton Honderich and Marc LePore contribute to a new program, which sees the creation of balloon-like machines that render the occupant invisible, and caged while walking free. The gards are supposed to be a more fiscally and morally responsible solution, when in fact they are just the newest way for society to avoid the r In the near future, prisons are no longer a preferable option to incarcerating criminals, so the American government looks to the latest advances in technology for a solution. Walton Honderich and Marc LePore contribute to a new program, which sees the creation of balloon-like machines that render the occupant invisible, and caged while walking free. The gards are supposed to be a more fiscally and morally responsible solution, when in fact they are just the newest way for society to avoid the real issues. By making prisoners invisible, humanity can literally forget them and the root causes of crime. However, things don't go this way, as a flaw in the system is discovered fairly early on. As for the moral implications, this is something which Wal and Marc themselves mention. What would total isolation, even when one is surrounded by people, do to the human mind? What would the constant fear of death from external tampering do? Neither has the answer, but just bringing it up is enough to leave it in our minds. The Furnace expertly flips back and forth in time, from the present in which the elderly Wal narrates the whole story while talking to his daughter, to the past when he and Marc were colleagues, to the even more distant memories of the childhoods that defined them. Regret permeates the narrative, and that is because, while the author wants us to mull over the big questions, he humanizes it by focusing on the effect such inventions have on their creators. Both Marc and Wal are a wreck, and the art shows their mental decline starkly. Rollins' highly detailed, sharp line work, textures, and desaturated colours have a gravity to them to match the serious nature of the thoughtfully written text. The author leaves it up to the readers to decide whether the cost was worth it or not, however, it also ends by saying that when we do err, redemption stems not necessarily from the person responsible, but lies in our future...children.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Strider

    Pros: decent artwork, interesting story, thought provoking Cons: left with questions In the future US Department of Gard Administration and affairs needed a new way to deal with the prison population. It created GARD, a ball that hovers 1 meter behind and 1.5 meters above the prisoner, creating a field that renders the prisoner unseen and unheard. This is the story of Walton Honderich, who must come to terms with how his brief contact with the unfinished GARD program in university affected the re Pros: decent artwork, interesting story, thought provoking Cons: left with questions In the future US Department of Gard Administration and affairs needed a new way to deal with the prison population. It created GARD, a ball that hovers 1 meter behind and 1.5 meters above the prisoner, creating a field that renders the prisoner unseen and unheard. This is the story of Walton Honderich, who must come to terms with how his brief contact with the unfinished GARD program in university affected the rest of his life. The story starts a bit slow and gains momentum through flashbacks. There’s a fair bit of philosophical dialogue which makes it surprising that so little time is spent debating the ethics of what the GARD program will do. The graphic novel does make you think about it though, the ethics and about how many people along the way could have stopped the program and didn’t. The artwork is done in a realistic style with subdued colours. It’s not my favourite style, but it’s well done. The art style and philosophy reminded me of Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta and Watchmen, though maybe a ‘light’ version, as the story isn’t as deep or heavy handed here. It’s an interesting story and worth a read or two.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'The Furnace' by Prentis Rollins is a furturistic story told in flashback. My review copy was only 16 pages of the 208 page story, so this isn't going to be much of a review. Based on what I got from the preview and the description, this is the story of a man who uses technology to hopefully further society. Along the way, there is loss. He creates a sort of hovering ball. While it is over your head, you are invisible. If you try to escape fom it, it is painful. In my excerpt he is testing it wit 'The Furnace' by Prentis Rollins is a furturistic story told in flashback. My review copy was only 16 pages of the 208 page story, so this isn't going to be much of a review. Based on what I got from the preview and the description, this is the story of a man who uses technology to hopefully further society. Along the way, there is loss. He creates a sort of hovering ball. While it is over your head, you are invisible. If you try to escape fom it, it is painful. In my excerpt he is testing it with a friend. What I got of the story was interesting, and I wouldn't mind reading more. The art was quite good. It's hard to recommend based on 16 pages, but I'm intrigued enough to read more, if that's any help. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Macmillan-Tor/Forge and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Murray

    I read this because it was positively reviewed somewhere and it was aimed at young adults. It's an interesting story told in flashbacks by Wal (Walton), who is a physicist, who was part of the GARD program that created self contained prisoner devices that floated above the prisoners and kept them invisible to the public. Wal is sharing this story with his daughter about how he was approached by another young physicist Marc who wants Wal to develop a system so the GARDs don't get hacked. As you c I read this because it was positively reviewed somewhere and it was aimed at young adults. It's an interesting story told in flashbacks by Wal (Walton), who is a physicist, who was part of the GARD program that created self contained prisoner devices that floated above the prisoners and kept them invisible to the public. Wal is sharing this story with his daughter about how he was approached by another young physicist Marc who wants Wal to develop a system so the GARDs don't get hacked. As you can guess something horribly goes wrong and prisoners start dying and no one knows why. This story is more of a morality play than a true suspense/sci-fi story. It maybe too cerebral for most teens who might want something more action packed. I would recommend for older teens due to language and adult angst.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy Giles

    Rollins plays devil’s advocate by poking at our flawed penal system, and the moral and ethical complications of a futuristic world where prisoners are reduced to the status of living ghosts. Haunting and deeply provocative, The Furnace is both a stunning and elegantly told story of one man’s struggle with his conscience and how to live with the repercussions of what he has wrought as well as the power of forgiveness. (I received an ARC of this book)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Conrad

    My copy was not 192 pages. I only had 16 pages, from the center of the book. It's an interesting concept, one I'd maybe read the rest of, if I could start from the beginning. People "disappearing" from society, able to see others but unable to be seen or heard. Perhaps as prisoners, or as punishment for wrong doing? Or used as a weapon by terrorists.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael D

    The Furnace is both beautifully drawn and thought provoking. With the advent of for-profit, privatized prisons, it is not hard to make the leap and consider a future filled with technology that replaces or supplements criminal punishment. The Furnace provides a lot of food for thought and does so in an aesthetically beautiful way. I look forward to the next Rollins joint!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Smith

    Meh Interesting concept, but the execution leaves something to be desired. Except in rare circumstances where it enhances the overall point of the comic, I am not a big fan of books that go nowhere.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jodie "Bookish" Cook

    Not much I can say about the Furnace other than I didn't like. It wasn't any one thing for it was a combination affect; i didn't like the art style or the story and felt no emotional connection whatsoever to any of the characters, so a no from me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Power

    Very interesting story with great artwork. I especially love how he handles the sky.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I thought the description of this graphic novel sounded very intriguing, so I was at first confused and then disappointed to realize that the download from NetGalley was only a sample of the book. Oddly it began on page 34 and ended on page 53, on what I believe will be a 192 page book, so I'm not even sure how the story began. The darkly hued illustrations had a gritty vibe and hinted at a grim morally ambiguous future, on the 20 pages I was able to read. While I am curious as to how the story I thought the description of this graphic novel sounded very intriguing, so I was at first confused and then disappointed to realize that the download from NetGalley was only a sample of the book. Oddly it began on page 34 and ended on page 53, on what I believe will be a 192 page book, so I'm not even sure how the story began. The darkly hued illustrations had a gritty vibe and hinted at a grim morally ambiguous future, on the 20 pages I was able to read. While I am curious as to how the story begins and then concludes, only giving a sample advance copy has actually hurt the chances of me looking for a complete edition.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  18. 5 out of 5

    Béline Bergamote

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie Steele

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dagny

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Skies

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jodie "Bookish" Cook

    Not much I can say about the Furnace other than I didn't like. It wasn't any one thing for it was a combination affect; i didn't like the art style or the story and felt no emotional connection whatsoever to any of the characters, so a no from me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra

    I did not realize this was only a sample which starts on page 34. While what I read was interesting and the graphics are quite good and in color, I can only give a 3 star review due to not knowing the rest of the story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nick Zinn

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.