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Unstoppable Moses

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After accidentally burning down a bowling alley with his cousin and best friend, Charlie, Moses has one week as a camp counselor to prove to the authorities—and to himself—that he isn't a worthless jerk who belongs in jail, when Charlie doesn't get that chance.


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After accidentally burning down a bowling alley with his cousin and best friend, Charlie, Moses has one week as a camp counselor to prove to the authorities—and to himself—that he isn't a worthless jerk who belongs in jail, when Charlie doesn't get that chance.

30 review for Unstoppable Moses

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 3.5 Stars I have a penchant for grief-and-loss books, and Unstoppable Moses definitely delivered a compelling portrait of one suffering a great loss. I found Moses journey from robot-boy back to feeling-human-boy quite beautiful. His pain, confusion, and complex emotions were well illustrated, and I found the exploration of his complicated relationship with his cousin quite interesting. I also really enjoyed being at camp. The camp served an important purpose, because it was there, that M Rating: 3.5 Stars I have a penchant for grief-and-loss books, and Unstoppable Moses definitely delivered a compelling portrait of one suffering a great loss. I found Moses journey from robot-boy back to feeling-human-boy quite beautiful. His pain, confusion, and complex emotions were well illustrated, and I found the exploration of his complicated relationship with his cousin quite interesting. I also really enjoyed being at camp. The camp served an important purpose, because it was there, that Moses began to heal and feel again. After almost a year, Moses was connecting with people again, and it was quite an interesting trio, who took Moses under their wing. They gave us some breaks from all the emotional turmoil, and the camp shenanigans were rather amusing. I struggled a little with parts of the story. There was one scene with an animal, which was really horrible. What made it worse, was that I didn't quite understand why I had to suffer through it. I didn't see its importance in the plot. Then there was the ending. Yes, Moses comes to some sort of understanding about his relationship with his cousin and works through a good amount of his pain, but I still had so many questions, and if there's one thing I struggle with the most, it's those open endings. Overall: This was an emotional exploration of grief, which was often heartbreaking and undeniably real.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maddison

    I won my copy of "Unstoppable Moses" through a Goodreads Giveaway. I liked "Unstoppable Moses," but I'd give it more of a 3.5/5 stars than a full 4. I'm glad I read it, but it seems to me more like a book to read once and pass on to a friend or other interested reader instead of re-reading. The cast of characters was interesting and pretty unique, so they held my interest throughout the story. Moses and Lump (and even Test sometimes) really drove the plot. Moses' narration was both funny and sad, I won my copy of "Unstoppable Moses" through a Goodreads Giveaway. I liked "Unstoppable Moses," but I'd give it more of a 3.5/5 stars than a full 4. I'm glad I read it, but it seems to me more like a book to read once and pass on to a friend or other interested reader instead of re-reading. The cast of characters was interesting and pretty unique, so they held my interest throughout the story. Moses and Lump (and even Test sometimes) really drove the plot. Moses' narration was both funny and sad, making his voice very realistic. The setting, too - mostly in a remote Midwestern summer camp - seemed fitting. It was easy to see parts of this novel as a film in my head, and often I found myself (with the help of Moses the narrator) envisioning what certain scenes would look like on a screen. The addition of Moses' suggested soundtrack certainly made certain scenes read more cinematically. At other times, the addition of songs felt a bit random and forced, though. Despite the things I enjoyed about "Unstoppable Moses," I sometimes lost motivation when reading it. I think this was partially because parts of the novel felt overwritten - sometimes the language was clunky and other times the plot dragged a bit. I noticed this the most towards the conclusion of the book. The ending was the most difficult part to read because it was so drawn out across multiple chapters. Every time I thought, "this is a perfect spot for this book to end," I realized I still had a handful of chapters to trudge through until the real conclusion. Likewise, I wasn't sure about some of the secondary characters like Michael, Matty, and Faisal. Matty's characterization suggests that she might become Moses' love interest - especially after she and Michael experience relationship problems - but this never panned out and felt like a hanging thread. Faisal, too, makes a mention of his romantic inclinations after a phone call with his mother reveals that someone has delivered flowers to the house for him, but all of this appears for seemingly no reason since his sexuality is never mentioned again in the book. Some of the younger campers, and the specificity assigned to them, also seems like a loose thread that left me wondering, "what was the point of that?" I also wasn't sure what to think about the plot twist that (view spoiler)[ Charlie isn't actually dead, but has been in a coma throughout the entirety of the novel despite Moses talking about him like he'd died as soon as the police officer shot him in the parking lot of the burning bowling alley. Part of me wanted to like it, but another part of me felt cheated. For how honest Moses is with his audience, failing to mention his cousin's actual state of being seemed distinctly out of character and left me frustrated more than anything. (hide spoiler)] That being said, "Unstoppable Moses," tackled difficult themes of loss, young adulthood, culpability, and guilt that many will probably relate to in some capacity. Moses' transformation from the beginning of the book to the end is inspiring, but in a that-could-actually-happen sort of way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy Doom

    A court order places a pathologically introspective teen in a position of responsibility at a skills building camp.Protagonist Moses Hill is an average, somewhat cerebral kid who has had a couple experiences that have knocked him far from the average teen original packaging and placed him in the "damaged, marked down to sell" bin. The fact that author Tyler James Smith avoids nearly all the cliche minefields this milieu offers is the most prevalent and greatest victory of the book. We get a real A court order places a pathologically introspective teen in a position of responsibility at a skills building camp.Protagonist Moses Hill is an average, somewhat cerebral kid who has had a couple experiences that have knocked him far from the average teen original packaging and placed him in the "damaged, marked down to sell" bin. The fact that author Tyler James Smith avoids nearly all the cliche minefields this milieu offers is the most prevalent and greatest victory of the book. We get a real tale of a real kid who operates by his own rules and even when he tries to shift into a more mature version of himself, grinds a few gears and doesn't bemoan it. Even when the "bigger than himself" moment presents itself, Moses still manages like a real, breathing teenager to fuck off on a tangent before pulling his past and future together and attempting to take care of some very important business. First time novelist Smith manages to bring the story to a close without forcing us to sit through a Disney fireworks show and hold hands while singing It's a Small World After All" when it would have been very easy to do so. The world of Unstoppable Moses is an only slightly less confusing place for the young semi-hero than when it began and that's just one of the reasons this book is so honest and so compelling. They are calling it a "YA" novel, but footnotes and all it has an appeal for a much wider audience than that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Though Moses is a young man in an unusual circumstance, his journey is a familiar one. His struggle with painful introspection and rediscovering normalcy post-trauma is something any reader can relate to. It's easy to keep turning pages as the tone shifts between comedic, sobering, uplifting and any combination of the above. This is NOT some tired coming of age story. This is an authentically human story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Griffoncloud

    Unstoppable Moses resonates with human voice and heart. This is a beautiful story of survival and broken pieces, and of messy, uncertain self-discovery. Smith moves from hysterically funny to heartbreaking to sobering and profound with skill and ease, and his characters feel authentic and deeply familiar.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rose Marie

    Following a broken, angry, confused teenage boy named Moses; Unstoppable Moses is a journey about survival, loss, and getting yourself together in the hopes of moving on from life's tragedies. Somehow the author manages to tell this story in a way that often switches between shockingly heartbreaking and suddenly funny. After Moses and his cousin execute a prank that goes horribly wrong, Moses must learn to live with life after loss and learn to deal with the many confusing feelings and thoughts Following a broken, angry, confused teenage boy named Moses; Unstoppable Moses is a journey about survival, loss, and getting yourself together in the hopes of moving on from life's tragedies. Somehow the author manages to tell this story in a way that often switches between shockingly heartbreaking and suddenly funny. After Moses and his cousin execute a prank that goes horribly wrong, Moses must learn to live with life after loss and learn to deal with the many confusing feelings and thoughts that come with losing his other half. After being accepted to be a camp counselor for a week he meets a group of friends and a lonely camper who, through adventure and more tragedy, help him realize sometimes you just need to pick up your broken pieces and start the new life you're thrust into. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend picking it up when it comes out this fall!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Swindlehurst

    I received this as an EARC from net galley for an honest review. I gave this a 4.75/5 stars. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this novel. I thought it would be a cliche contemporary but it wasn't. I felt as though it was written very well and I was sucked into the novel and couldn't put it down. The synopsis may not be that compelling because I know it wasn't for me but its defiantly one you need to pick up this summer. would highly recommend.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Avid Reader and Geek Girl

    FTC DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED AN E-ARC FROM THE PUBLISHER THROUGH NET GALLEY. I VOLUNTARILY OFFER MY HONEST REVIEW OF THE BOOK, THOUGH IT IS NOT EXPECTED OF ME! RECEIPT OF THIS BOOK IN THIS MANNER DOES NOT AFFECT MY OPINION OF THE BOOK OR THE CONTENT OF MY REVIEW! I enjoyed this book a lot. If you liked The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas you will enjoy this book. Moses was a very well written character, he had many dimensions and wasn't just some screw-up who burnt down a bowling alley and got sentenc FTC DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED AN E-ARC FROM THE PUBLISHER THROUGH NET GALLEY. I VOLUNTARILY OFFER MY HONEST REVIEW OF THE BOOK, THOUGH IT IS NOT EXPECTED OF ME! RECEIPT OF THIS BOOK IN THIS MANNER DOES NOT AFFECT MY OPINION OF THE BOOK OR THE CONTENT OF MY REVIEW! I enjoyed this book a lot. If you liked The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas you will enjoy this book. Moses was a very well written character, he had many dimensions and wasn't just some screw-up who burnt down a bowling alley and got sentenced to community service, he was also very intelligent and compassionate. Charlie, on the other hand, was very one-dimensional thought a smaller character in the story, by the end you didn't really feel sorry for what had happened to him. He seemed like a big jerk! Mattie, Micheal, and Faisal were a bit one-dimensional also, but since it was told form Moses POV and he didn't know them well that makes more sense. I was definitely Lump as a child, so I really enjoyed that character, who was also well written. There were some unneeded elements to the story, like the porcupine, which I really didn't like. That element and the fact that after a strong start it got a bit boring for about 20% of the book, then picking up for the last 50-75% of the book, is why I gave it 4 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Note: I received a copy of Unstoppable Moses by Tyler James Smith via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 17-year old Moses Hill takes on the position of a camp counselor to prove to the authorities & to himself that he isn't a delinquent who deserves to be tossed away in jail. Why? A prank goes horribly wrong, as Moses and his cousin Charlie, accidentally burn down a bowling alley. But, that's not all! With the destruction of the bowling alley came the burning of a stolen Rock-and-Ro Note: I received a copy of Unstoppable Moses by Tyler James Smith via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 17-year old Moses Hill takes on the position of a camp counselor to prove to the authorities & to himself that he isn't a delinquent who deserves to be tossed away in jail. Why? A prank goes horribly wrong, as Moses and his cousin Charlie, accidentally burn down a bowling alley. But, that's not all! With the destruction of the bowling alley came the burning of a stolen Rock-and-Roll Jesus, and other religious figures like Buddha and Vishnu. Unstoppable Moses is a coming-of-age novel that's filled with real human emotions we've all felt at one time or another. Listen, the first chapter of Unstoppable Moses really had me in its grasp. Not to be dramatic, but wow -- talk about amazing novel beginnings. I envisioned the entire scene as I read it, and felt that I could even hear Guns N' Roses playing in the background. The beginning of Unstoppable Moses truly felt more like a cinematic experience, than a novel. & it's the ending of the beginning chapter that really begs you to keep reading. Unstoppable Moses held a cast of relatable & well-developed characters. Through dialogue and actions, you are able to learn so much about each supporting character; without being bombarded with long and drawn out back-stories. Moses, who is constantly seen as the delinquent who committed a hate-crime, finally finds a group of friends that don't know he's the kid behind the very publicized fire. He finds himself in awe with the fact of how open they are about their lives; as if secrets are non-existent. I loved watching the development of Moses becoming more comfortable with this new crew. But my favorite part? Lump. Allison, nick-named Lump, is one of the campers. She's young, she's courageous, and she has a huge heart. Everyone can learn something from this little girl. Her hero is Amelia Earhart, and she even names a missing fawn Harriet Tubman. I love this girl. & it's Lump that truly pushes the story forward, and shows Moses that he's not some cold-hearted human. Honestly, everyone should be more like Lump. There are other things I enjoyed in Unstoppable Moses, such as the footnotes added throughout the chapters, and the chapters that alternated between past & present. Everything just fit. I enjoyed Unstoppable Moses by Tyler James Smith. Contemporary isn't usually my go-to genre, but I did enjoy watching Moses development throughout. I enjoyed all of the characters, and again, that opening scene was epic. Unstoppable Moses is definitely a book I recommend. For more of my reviews check out my blog!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Judith A.

    A true coming-of-age book with relatable characters. An extremely well written tale. Keeps you engaged from the first page. Highly recommend!

  11. 5 out of 5

    emma

    Ok, so I had no idea what I was getting into here, and I think the initial draw was the cover, but this was the most pleasantly surprised I’ve been by a book in a long time. The first chapter of this was probably the best first chapter of any book I’ve ever read, and I don’t say that lightly. It holds nothing back, and could honestly be a short story or something on its own. The writing style here is one of my absolute favorites. It does a good job of balancing the grittier real-life elements with Ok, so I had no idea what I was getting into here, and I think the initial draw was the cover, but this was the most pleasantly surprised I’ve been by a book in a long time. The first chapter of this was probably the best first chapter of any book I’ve ever read, and I don’t say that lightly. It holds nothing back, and could honestly be a short story or something on its own. The writing style here is one of my absolute favorites. It does a good job of balancing the grittier real-life elements with bigger thematic ideas without disrupting the flow. There are occasional chapters that go back in time, and those were a really nice break from the present story that also helped to highlight the effects Charlie had on Moses’ life. The story really unfolds nicely (not neatly, but I wouldn't want it that way) overall. I’d probably rate this slightly below five stars because I did disconnect a little due to a couple crude jokes that seemed oddly timed to me (definitely just a personal preference, nothing I think was objectively badly done). I didn't find that any of these got in the way of the story as a whole either. Oh, also, if you like your YA on the cleaner end of things or you’re sensitive to language, probably skip this one. Otherwise, definitely check it out. Even though the plot itself is pretty wild, below the surface it's tremendously relatable. p.s. I got an ARC of this book for free through a Goodreads giveaway.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jane Smith

    I loved this book! Very refreshing, original story. Draws you in and keeps you guessing til the end.

  13. 4 out of 5

    April X

    4.25/5 "Charlie Baltimore murdered me when we were 8 years old." I liked this book a lot more than I was expecting to, it gave me some John Green vibes (John Green is one of my favorite authors). It was funny, cute, and had just the right amount of existential angst I look for in a coming of age story. Even though I don't actually like kids in real life that much, I liked reading about the kids at the camp (Lump!) and the crazy hijinks of the camp buddies. I think my only complaint was the ending 4.25/5 "Charlie Baltimore murdered me when we were 8 years old." I liked this book a lot more than I was expecting to, it gave me some John Green vibes (John Green is one of my favorite authors). It was funny, cute, and had just the right amount of existential angst I look for in a coming of age story. Even though I don't actually like kids in real life that much, I liked reading about the kids at the camp (Lump!) and the crazy hijinks of the camp buddies. I think my only complaint was the ending was a little too open-ended for me, I would have liked something with more of a resolution, but I have this feeling toward most contemporary books so maybe it's just me. Overall, although this wasn't something I would normally pick up, I enjoyed it a lot and look forward to reading more from this author :) I received this ARC from a Goodreads First Reads giveaway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth Loflin

    Unstoppable Moses is a coming of age book. This young man was just being a boy, got wrapped up in a situation that turned tragic. As kids, we all knew how things escalate into things that weren’t supposed to happen. Moses is court orders to go to a camp and basically work for a week to help change him. He meets a group of characters that accept him for him, the first time in a long time, he can just be himself. He meets an amazing kid that touches his heart. I won’t spoil what happens, but his h Unstoppable Moses is a coming of age book. This young man was just being a boy, got wrapped up in a situation that turned tragic. As kids, we all knew how things escalate into things that weren’t supposed to happen. Moses is court orders to go to a camp and basically work for a week to help change him. He meets a group of characters that accept him for him, the first time in a long time, he can just be himself. He meets an amazing kid that touches his heart. I won’t spoil what happens, but his heart is changed. I think it’s a turning point for him to finally grow up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara White

    Unstoppable Moses is a book I'm unable to keep on the shelves in my classroom library. My students have enjoyed it, they're telling their friends about it, and talking amongst themselves about the characters and reality of the story. I believe this book can span readers from the YA category to adults. Thanks to Goodreads First Reads for a copy of Unstoppable Moses. My students and I look forward to more books from Tyler James Smith.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pam Mooney

    A wonderful coming of age story! Relatable in many ways where the characters are fully developed and likeable. While some of the experiences are not what we have experienced we certainly know someone who has. The camp setting was very real, funny, tragic, and brought back memories both good and bad. Hee! An author to follow and a good read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Unstoppable Moses is a terrific debut for Tyler James Smith. Moses opens the story by explaining how he died and came back after his cousin Charlie accidentally shot him when they were kids, hence his “unstoppable” reputation. The two of them became inseparable companions in a variety of stunts, until a prank gone wrong leads to a destructive fire and Charlie being shot in the head by a cop. As part of court-ordered community service for the fire, Moses is required to be a “buddy” (read, counselo Unstoppable Moses is a terrific debut for Tyler James Smith. Moses opens the story by explaining how he died and came back after his cousin Charlie accidentally shot him when they were kids, hence his “unstoppable” reputation. The two of them became inseparable companions in a variety of stunts, until a prank gone wrong leads to a destructive fire and Charlie being shot in the head by a cop. As part of court-ordered community service for the fire, Moses is required to be a “buddy” (read, counselor) at a camp for kids. Moses just wants to put his head down and get through the experience, like he’s done for every moment of every day since Charlie was shot. But three potential new friends and a kid who’s pretty unstoppable in her own right force Moses out of his emotional stasis and encourage him to reconnect with the people around him. I’m not sure the style the book is written in will work for everyone. The story flips back and forth between Moses’s present experiences at the camp and episodes in his past with Charlie and after Charlie was shot. That shifting between past and present might annoy some readers. Moses’s narration is also sometimes interrupted by endnotes that contain additional information and commentary about things Moses says or thinks as he is telling his story. Sometimes they seemed unnecessary to the actual meat of the novel, like telling the reader how to say “I love you” in binary. However, most of the time they worked for me, because they gave deeper insight into what Moses is feeling at certain points, since what he says and what he feels aren’t always the same. That’s really the key to the book, Moses learning to feel again after shutting down emotionally for a long time, and the way Smith describes that process and the language he uses are both often wonderful. Some of the emotional moments are just amazingly written; they left me thinking, “Yes, that, that’s just right for that character right now.” The short chapter where Moses describes exactly what happened as Charlie was shot is one long run-on sentence, which absolutely conveys how shocking it is. I won’t say the book is always perfect—sometimes the description of what Moses is feeling is maybe a little too elliptical—but generally it works. I think Tyler James Smith is an author to watch, and I’d highly recommend this novel for adventurous readers of YA contemporaries. A copy of this book was provided through NetGalley for review; all opinions expressed are my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Avid Reader and Geek Girl

    FTC DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED AN E-ARC FROM THE PUBLISHER THROUGH NET GALLEY. I VOLUNTARILY OFFER MY HONEST REVIEW OF THE BOOK, THOUGH IT IS NOT EXPECTED OF ME! RECEIPT OF THIS BOOK IN THIS MANNER DOES NOT AFFECT MY OPINION OF THE BOOK OR THE CONTENT OF MY REVIEW! I enjoyed this book a lot. If you liked The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas you will enjoy this book. Moses was a very well written character, he had many dimensions and wasn't just some screw-up who burnt down a bowling alley and got sentenc FTC DISCLAIMER: I RECEIVED AN E-ARC FROM THE PUBLISHER THROUGH NET GALLEY. I VOLUNTARILY OFFER MY HONEST REVIEW OF THE BOOK, THOUGH IT IS NOT EXPECTED OF ME! RECEIPT OF THIS BOOK IN THIS MANNER DOES NOT AFFECT MY OPINION OF THE BOOK OR THE CONTENT OF MY REVIEW! I enjoyed this book a lot. If you liked The Hate You Give by Angie Thomas you will enjoy this book. Moses was a very well written character, he had many dimensions and wasn't just some screw-up who burnt down a bowling alley and got sentenced to community service, he was also very intelligent and compassionate. Charlie, on the other hand, was very one-dimensional thought a smaller character in the story, by the end you didn't really feel sorry for what had happened to him. He seemed like a big jerk! Mattie, Micheal, and Faisal were a bit one-dimensional also, but since it was told form Moses POV and he didn't know them well that makes more sense. I was definitely Lump as a child, so I really enjoyed that character, who was also well written. There were some unneeded elements to the story, like the porcupine, which I really didn't like. That element and the fact that after a strong start it got a bit boring for about 20% of the book, then picking up for the last 50-75% of the book, is why I gave it 4 stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to Newtgalkey for the ARC! I had a hard time getting into this book at first. I couldn’t figure out where it was going. Then when it flashed back, I had to reframe in my mind what time I was reading about. But once Moses is really at the camp and getting to know those kids and fellow counselors, I got sucked in. The dialogue was witty, and I had moments where I laughed. I enjoyed the characters and was able to care about them and occurred them. Honestly, I didn’t love the ending, though. I Thanks to Newtgalkey for the ARC! I had a hard time getting into this book at first. I couldn’t figure out where it was going. Then when it flashed back, I had to reframe in my mind what time I was reading about. But once Moses is really at the camp and getting to know those kids and fellow counselors, I got sucked in. The dialogue was witty, and I had moments where I laughed. I enjoyed the characters and was able to care about them and occurred them. Honestly, I didn’t love the ending, though. I can’t see exactly why that was the way to go, it or didn’t ruin it for me; it just kept me from genuinely loving it. Just FYI there’s a lot of strong profanity/language in here ( which honestly make me cringe as I used to be a camp counselor), and there’s some sexual references. Overall, fresh concept and interesting read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dani Amaya

    Moses was an incredibly powerful and compelling narrator. From the first page to the last, he was the sole reason I kept reading. To me, his journey was exceptionally difficult. Many times, I'll read similar stories and I can identify the problem and how it can be solved, but I just couldn't with Moses. Maybe because his problems differ so much from my own or because our personalities are so similar. A great aspect to this book was formatting. I've never read a YA book with footnotes. I'm impre Moses was an incredibly powerful and compelling narrator. From the first page to the last, he was the sole reason I kept reading. To me, his journey was exceptionally difficult. Many times, I'll read similar stories and I can identify the problem and how it can be solved, but I just couldn't with Moses. Maybe because his problems differ so much from my own or because our personalities are so similar. A great aspect to this book was formatting. I've never read a YA book with footnotes. I'm impressed. It was a fantastic idea that showed a lot of Moses's personality and thought process. I really thought I wasn't going to cry when I started this book, boy was I wrong! I was blubbering by the end. Though I'm not sure I understood precisely how everything went down, I got confused at times. And I definitely wish it hadn't ended so soon. I was just very emotional about all of it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    The novel started off intensely but never regained that intensity. The camp scenes were very boring to me. The idea that a judge would punish a criminal kid by putting him in a position of authority over young children seems highly unlikely to me. I couldn't quite get past that detail. The author seemed in such a hurry to write the big picture that he neglected the finer details. There were many loose ends that were not addressed, and the surprise about Charlie made the whole story feel like a l The novel started off intensely but never regained that intensity. The camp scenes were very boring to me. The idea that a judge would punish a criminal kid by putting him in a position of authority over young children seems highly unlikely to me. I couldn't quite get past that detail. The author seemed in such a hurry to write the big picture that he neglected the finer details. There were many loose ends that were not addressed, and the surprise about Charlie made the whole story feel like a lie.

  22. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    more like 3.5 I adored the premise of Unstoppable Moses. The idea that you're a miracle boy, and untouchable....until you're not. You walk through life where doors just open for you, where circumstances happen, and fall into place. And then one day, the cloud disappears and your feet touch the ground. That isn't where my enjoyment of the book stopped though. Unstoppable Moses is a book about grief, blame, responsibility, and regret.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Heartbreaking and relatable coming-of-age story, driven by grief and the creation of new friendships. Ending is more realistic than satisfying, driving home that we all can have new beginnings.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    I highly recommend this one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Yarbrough

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erin Shirely

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine Badenhop

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amber Atchley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Rodriguez

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rob

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