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The Lost Princess of Oz - Special Edition - [Oxford University Press] - (Oz #11)

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Who is stealing all the magic in Oz? Dorothy and her friends set out to comb all of Oz, not only for magic stolen from Glinda and the Wizard, but also for the kidnapped princess, Ozma. Along the way, they explore regions never seen in other Oz books, meeting strange and interesting people and animals, and falling into peril more than once. It’s a desperate mission – for if Who is stealing all the magic in Oz? Dorothy and her friends set out to comb all of Oz, not only for magic stolen from Glinda and the Wizard, but also for the kidnapped princess, Ozma. Along the way, they explore regions never seen in other Oz books, meeting strange and interesting people and animals, and falling into peril more than once. It’s a desperate mission – for if the thefts are all linked, then it means that some magician unknown to them has acquired powers beyond any available to them now. How will they find him? And how will they conquer him? Not one of them knows – but with continuing faith that goodness will triumph, they march forth to try.


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Who is stealing all the magic in Oz? Dorothy and her friends set out to comb all of Oz, not only for magic stolen from Glinda and the Wizard, but also for the kidnapped princess, Ozma. Along the way, they explore regions never seen in other Oz books, meeting strange and interesting people and animals, and falling into peril more than once. It’s a desperate mission – for if Who is stealing all the magic in Oz? Dorothy and her friends set out to comb all of Oz, not only for magic stolen from Glinda and the Wizard, but also for the kidnapped princess, Ozma. Along the way, they explore regions never seen in other Oz books, meeting strange and interesting people and animals, and falling into peril more than once. It’s a desperate mission – for if the thefts are all linked, then it means that some magician unknown to them has acquired powers beyond any available to them now. How will they find him? And how will they conquer him? Not one of them knows – but with continuing faith that goodness will triumph, they march forth to try.

30 review for The Lost Princess of Oz - Special Edition - [Oxford University Press] - (Oz #11)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    One fine morning in the Land of Oz Dorothy decided to show her friends around. Because nobody can as much as sneeze without asking Ozma's permission - I have this impression - Dorothy went to Ozma and realized that the latter disappeared: mysteriously and without any trace. Not to worry, Ozma had a magic picture which could show any what any person was currently doing. It turned out the picture is missing too, and so are all of Wizard's magic trinkets. The latter rushed to Glinda only to learn t One fine morning in the Land of Oz Dorothy decided to show her friends around. Because nobody can as much as sneeze without asking Ozma's permission - I have this impression - Dorothy went to Ozma and realized that the latter disappeared: mysteriously and without any trace. Not to worry, Ozma had a magic picture which could show any what any person was currently doing. It turned out the picture is missing too, and so are all of Wizard's magic trinkets. The latter rushed to Glinda only to learn that her magic book and the rest of her magic junk disappeared as well. Actually both wizards appeared completely helpless and useless without their magical stuff, so a search expedition is assembled. At the same time in a remote isolated corner of Oz a cook found her magic (can you see the common theme?) frying pan is stolen. She is determined to find it at all costs; Frogman - who is basically a giant frog - decided to accompany her. Two parties are destined to meet almost near their goal. On the positive side I can definitely say this is an improvement of the tried-and-true generic plot of an Oz book: people ended up in a desolated place and try to get somewhere meeting a lot of bizarre creatures and ending up in Emerald City. However it is not as good as the last book which gave me a hope of series improvement. The development of Frogman went exactly nowhere: there was an interesting buildup which has not resulted in anything by the time the book ended. Can somebody clue me in what was the point of Toto losing his growl subplot? This one went over my head completely. Button-Bright deserves to be mentioned. It quickly becomes my second most disliked character in the series; Ozma steadily holds the first place. The guy is not exactly a genius as his name implies. His favorite pastime is to get lost. Who in his/her right mind would include such guy into a search party??? Let me ask a trick question: whom the said search party was looking for most of the time of the tale: Ozma, or Button-Bright? Let me give you a hint - if you think the answer is Ozma, you are very much wrong. So an interesting beginning marred by so-so characters and somewhat contrived development of the plot give 3 star rating. It is still better than books 2-9.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tabby

    One of my favorite Oz books! review to come (maybe)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joni

    Although this book was 100% Oz, it felt different to me than previous ones. It once again had a sound plot, and there weren't any bizarre character introduced unnecessarily. All of the scenes in the book contributed to the movement of the story. Maybe Baum is just finally growing up into his writing... I'll take it. :) Two notes about this book. First: We finally see Toto talk!! The story goes that he gained the ability to talk as soon as he entered Oz in book one, but he's just too wise to waste Although this book was 100% Oz, it felt different to me than previous ones. It once again had a sound plot, and there weren't any bizarre character introduced unnecessarily. All of the scenes in the book contributed to the movement of the story. Maybe Baum is just finally growing up into his writing... I'll take it. :) Two notes about this book. First: We finally see Toto talk!! The story goes that he gained the ability to talk as soon as he entered Oz in book one, but he's just too wise to waste words unnecessarily. Um, whatever. Second: It's unclear to me why Trot & Captain Bill remained living in Oz. Previous mortals who have been allowed permanent residence in Oz had nowhere else to go and no family to return to. But at the beginning of The Scarecrow of Oz, where we meet those two character, we are told that Trot has a home and a mother, and she just spends most of her days with Captain Bill. Unless there's more to the story that is explained in Baum's other Trot & CB books, then why is Trot removed from her family with no explanation?? I don't like that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    I previously read this book in 5th grade and again, at least in part, in college. This is one of the best books in the Oz series, in spite of Ozma being a damsel in distress for almost the entire book. It takes a lot of people, not just any one person, to rescue her, so at least there is that. In fact, the book is so populated with characters that many go off and Baum doesn't even bother to follow them, so perhaps the book's biggest flaw is that Baum follows the relevant search parties to the ex I previously read this book in 5th grade and again, at least in part, in college. This is one of the best books in the Oz series, in spite of Ozma being a damsel in distress for almost the entire book. It takes a lot of people, not just any one person, to rescue her, so at least there is that. In fact, the book is so populated with characters that many go off and Baum doesn't even bother to follow them, so perhaps the book's biggest flaw is that Baum follows the relevant search parties to the exclusion of the other search parties (I guess Baum thought that The Shaggy Man and his brother and Ojo, Unc Nunkie, and Dr. Pipt had been featured too much recently to be rate more than a mention, whereas Scraps had caught the imagination of his correspondents). It might also have been better if Dorothy's transformation experiments with the magic belt had been shown unexplained until later, but perhaps Baum didn't want to make Dorothy seem too sinister, but these are minor. The book also has some pretty intense philosophical discussion that shows some of Baum's strongest influence from Lewis Carroll's constructions of logic, but the tone is different, and Baum's love of diversity comes through the strongest. I actually thought it odd that no one has decided to handle it as an adaptation, with special effects fantasies being popular these days. Who wouldn't want to see the super-strong Frogman battling with a giant grey dove in a large domed palace made of wicker? Maybe when Marvel adapted the Baum books, Skottie Young didn't want to draw a wicker palace. John R. Neill doesn't try (he shows the castle only from a distance), but he does make a couple of gaffes with the text, such as dressing Button-Bright in 1917 American clothes rather than similarly to Ojo, but different colors, as described by the text, and showing a banner in a tower of Herku when the text specifically mentions that there is none.) The Herkus are a fine example of Baum being a better writer than Ruth Plumly Thompson. Not only is the episode relevant to the rest of the story, but neither the Thists nor the Herkus call for the bizarre conformity that Thompson and many Baum successors display in the quaint towns of Oz. The Thists don't mind when the Ozmites say that they cannot eat thistles, nor do the Herkus either enslave the Ozmites as they do the giants, nor do they force them to eat the zosozo that makes them so strong. Indeed, both are gracious and hospitable hosts, even if the Ozmites find the Thists annoying. (This edition makes the Thists the cover picture.) I wasn't crazy about Toto's complaint about his lost growl, but since it seems to come back naturally, it may just be that the humor didn't work too well on me. Still, the Thists and the Herkus are both commentaries on autocratic governments and deserve to be looked at seriously, although of course humor is intended on a certain level, as well. I really enjoyed the class commentary as the Yip men accompany the Frogman and Cayke down the mesa, only to go back after their clothes get ripped protecting those of the Frogman and Cakye. The Frogman has always been a controversial character--Eric Shanower even destroyed him in an Oziana story--but I found him intensely likable once he bathed in the Truth Pond. He wants to be as wise and learned the way he was once perceived, and seeks to come by it honestly once under the compulsion of the Truth Pond, previously seen in The Road to Oz . He would have made an excellent foil for Mr. H. M. Woggle-Bug T.E., who is mentioned only briefly in this book. When we return to the Scarecrow and Tin Woodman toward the end of the book, they have their usual bit about feeling superior to people made of meat, but how did they swallow Professor Woggle-Bug's pills, as it is implied that they do near the beginning of the book? I can easily imagine the Frogman trying to keep the Woggle-Bug honest and stop puffing himself up so much as they both continue their scholarly pursuits. Perhaps the greatest element of the book is its themee of redemption as expressed through Ugu the Shoemaker. Vig, the Czarover of Herku, says that he would not call Ugu wicked, merely very ambitious. This leads to wicked behavior on his part, but he demonstrates an unwillingness to cause anyone serious harm, and the book ends with him realizing he is wrong and desiring to redeem himself. Having been the descendant of sorcerers, he was unhappy as a shoemaker, and this gives his character some motivation. Contrast him with the minor character of the ferryman, who was punished by the Tin Woodman for harming animals by being completely unable to communicate with them. This makes him unhappy around animals because it reminds him of his past cruelty. Some have dismissed the ferryman as an irrelevant episode, but it speaks to the book's overarching theme by contrasting a man who does evil to no purpose and one who does evil to advance himself and being unable to recognize it. I suspect he saw that in many an ambitious capitalist in our own world. The live teddy bears, while surely an appeal to the book's youngest readers, give the book a contemporary feel, especially when the Big Lavender Bear threatens to send misbehaving subjects to American children--reminding us that Oz is not "once upon a time," but simply in a dimension invisible to us.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lee Födi

    Ah, this is one of the most tantalizing installments in the Oz series. Not only does it feature perhaps the best title of all of L. Frank Baum's Oz books, it has one of the biggest casts of characters at work. When Ozma disappears, all her friends go and search for her—as a result, we get to read about many of our old favorites from the Land of Oz, including Dorothy, the Patchwork Girl, the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger, the Scarecrow, et al. The other aspect of this book that separates it fro Ah, this is one of the most tantalizing installments in the Oz series. Not only does it feature perhaps the best title of all of L. Frank Baum's Oz books, it has one of the biggest casts of characters at work. When Ozma disappears, all her friends go and search for her—as a result, we get to read about many of our old favorites from the Land of Oz, including Dorothy, the Patchwork Girl, the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger, the Scarecrow, et al. The other aspect of this book that separates it from the other Oz titles is that it involves a true mystery—one that keeps the reader turning the pages, to discover just what has become of Ozma. This book is a lot of fun and I quite enjoyed the illustrations, especially the one that shows our band of rescuers gazing upon themselves in the Magic Picture. If you are looking to revisit the world of Oz, this book will be one of the most satisfying for you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    hpboy13

    The best thing about this Oz book is that it has all the main characters adventuring together - the entire huge ensemble of them - as they search for Ozma. ETA 2018: The above point still stands - it is nice to see the stable of Oz characters undertake an adventure, instead of being the deus ex machina in someone else's story. While it seems to me we all could have been better off if Ozma had stayed lost, this was an enjoyable read. I didn't care for the Magic Belt being the last-minute answer to The best thing about this Oz book is that it has all the main characters adventuring together - the entire huge ensemble of them - as they search for Ozma. ETA 2018: The above point still stands - it is nice to see the stable of Oz characters undertake an adventure, instead of being the deus ex machina in someone else's story. While it seems to me we all could have been better off if Ozma had stayed lost, this was an enjoyable read. I didn't care for the Magic Belt being the last-minute answer to everything, but ah well - the journey was fun.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Sizemore

    90/100 I actually thinks this is the quintessential Oz book. It features most of the characters you know and love from the series and a sharp narrative angle. We sped through it because my kids were really interested to hear what happened next. I think we finished the final third in one sitting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Kilgore

    I’ve said for years that this was my favorite and it still is. From the brilliant opening lines to the exciting conclusion, this is Oz and Baum and it’s best. It’s a great little mystery Tale with a delightful mix of new and old characters. I cannot recommend this one enough.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Olsey

    Lost Classic? "...day dreams, you know, with your eyes wide open and your brain-machinery whizzing -- are likely to lead to the betterment of the word." - L. Frank Baum The awesomely vivid imagination of L. Frank Baum gave life to thirteen (yes, thirteen) sequels of the popular children’s novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900). Somewhat bizarrely, I've jumped in at number eleven in the series, The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) and now I must rant and rave (more raving, less ranting) about said exp Lost Classic? "...day dreams, you know, with your eyes wide open and your brain-machinery whizzing -- are likely to lead to the betterment of the word." - L. Frank Baum The awesomely vivid imagination of L. Frank Baum gave life to thirteen (yes, thirteen) sequels of the popular children’s novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900). Somewhat bizarrely, I've jumped in at number eleven in the series, The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) and now I must rant and rave (more raving, less ranting) about said experience. When ultimately comparing The Lost Princess of Oz to the famed first novel, the characters are still flamboyant and (for the most part) likable if not more so, which seems incredible after sixteen-years and ten predecessors. The Frogman and 'the little brown bear' Corporal Waddle are especially cool as are many of the other larger-than-life supporting animal characters; they ensure comedy at times and even a touch of philosophy. Familiar company – Dorothy, Toto, The Cowardly Lion and The Wizard are back, who in varying degrees are defunct or different than they once were, merely serving as token characters, no doubt to keep children from the emerging last century contented. It is clear that Baum liked to create newness rather than retread, despite familiar themes and of course the vast number of volumes in the Oz series. That said, despite my initial surprise and hesitance at Toto being able to speak, I enjoyed his protest at losing his growl. Endearing and bizarre all at once, as Baum’s characters often are. Yes, you've guessed it, there is a huge theme of individuality and identity neatly wrapped with morality for children (and for some adults too!) to read in between the lines if they so wish to. Dorothy is kind of dull and bratty and don’t even get me started on Scraps (The Patchwork Girl who has an entire novel dedicated to her some years earlier). Throughout their journey quest to recover all the stolen magic from Oz (and Princess Ozma), the Frogman seems like one of perhaps only a few characters who actually discovered something about himself and grew as a (person?) frog, subsequently. The narrative kept me turning the pages despite my underwhelming understanding and appreciation of Princess Ozma – that serves me right for jumping so far ahead. 'Princess of Oz is more ambitious than the first book which endears it as well as stops it entering the realms of being a classic. There is perhaps too large of an ensemble cast and the non-linear narrative and different perspectives make it less iconic as well as previously established characters don't quite come to life. In spite of this, personally missing sixteen-years of Oz history and Baum writing many of these sequels much out of a financial dependency The Lost Princess of Oz is perhaps still more re-readable than the original classic. I am near the end of the book, so must confess I am reviewing a book I haven’t finished reading yet. I will however tell you on the off-chance things go wrong. I didn't really need to tell you that so surely I must have taken a dip in The Truth Pond like our dear character the Frogman. For all ages -- enjoy. Update: By no means a spec-fabulous ending, but still enjoyable. If you liked reading this you also might like my blog www.readilyreread.blogspot.com

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This book is classic Baum - fun fairy-land adventures, all manners of creative and amusing oddities, great variety of characters. A great story for kids, or for any fan of Oz. However, from a storytelling and writing craft perspective, I have to rate this with only three stars. Baum follows his standard procedure of the main plot being nothing more than "wandering around Oz encountering oddities." The guise for this wandering is a search for Ozma and various magical talismans, which have gone mis This book is classic Baum - fun fairy-land adventures, all manners of creative and amusing oddities, great variety of characters. A great story for kids, or for any fan of Oz. However, from a storytelling and writing craft perspective, I have to rate this with only three stars. Baum follows his standard procedure of the main plot being nothing more than "wandering around Oz encountering oddities." The guise for this wandering is a search for Ozma and various magical talismans, which have gone missing. But what starts out as a potentially dramatic plot turns into the wandering bit, and an unusual amount of sobbing about "our poor Ozma" on the part of several of the characters. The final battle with the bad guy was unusually trite, even for Baum (yes, I know it's a children's book, but some of the books have had much better "good guys vanquish the bad guys" climaxes than this one). The moral of the story (ask for forgiveness if you've done wrong, and always forgive others) was a bit more heavy-handed than the moral lesson in some of his other books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathrin

    It’s been a while since I started reading the Oz series. Looking back my main intention was to finally read the story I had heard a couple of times before. Since it’s a children’s book series I never had that much expectations but some of the books really surprised me while others bored me to no end. This certainly was one of the better ones. For once, it was more complex than other books in the series and some very interesting characters were introduced. The story of having all magical objects a It’s been a while since I started reading the Oz series. Looking back my main intention was to finally read the story I had heard a couple of times before. Since it’s a children’s book series I never had that much expectations but some of the books really surprised me while others bored me to no end. This certainly was one of the better ones. For once, it was more complex than other books in the series and some very interesting characters were introduced. The story of having all magical objects as well as Ozma stolen was something new and it gave way to a quite inter-esting journey through Oz. This story world might not be the most astonishing one I ever en-countered but it’s always nice to come back and learn more about different regions as well as characters. My personal favourite was probably the frogman and although the series disap-pointed me more than once I look forward to continue reading it. Hopefully the next books will use the potential of the world as well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well that author L. Frank Baum ended up penning a whole series of sequels, because of the original book's astounding success back at the turn of the 20th century when it was first published -- 13 sequels altogether, before his death in 1919, which after the movie's success twenty years later became a literal merchandising empire, spawning hundreds more official sequels by various authors and hundreds more unofficial ones once the characters moved into the public domain. And like many others, I've always been interested in what these 14 "canonical" Oz books have to say; and that's why I decided this winter to sit down and read them all in a row for the first time, easy to do because of them being available for free at both Project Gutenberg and the email subscription service DailyLit (which is how I myself read them, and in fact is how I read many of the older books you see reviewed here; I'm a big fan of theirs, and highly recommend them). But of course, to even approach these books with the right mindset, it's important to understand that like so many other one-hit-wonders, Baum was not only eluded by success in most of his other endeavors but was an active failure at them -- in the 1870s, for example, he unsuccessfully tried his hand at breeding fancy poultry (a national fad at the time), then in the 1880s opened his own theatre and became one of the first-ever Americans to produce modern-style stage musicals, apparently a little too ahead of its time, then in the 1890s moved to the Dakota Territory and opened a dry-goods store that eventually failed, as well as starting a newspaper that folded too. So it was sort of a case of random lightning in a bottle when he decided in the late 1890s to try his hand at children's literature, and ended up with his very first title being the most popular kid's book in America for two years straight, and no surprise that Baum then spent the rest of his life desperately trying to figure out how to bottle that lightning again. Because now that I've read it myself, I can confirm that the original Wonderful Wizard of Oz is astonishingly great, a sort of miraculous combination of traits that makes for an almost perfect children's story; and although most of it follows the same storyline seen in the '39 movie, there are also significant differences, making it worth your while to sit and read the book version if you have the interest. (And by the way, for some really interesting reading, check out the academic analysis that was done of this book in the 1960s, arguing that most of its details symbolically correspond almost exactly to various political and economic issues of the late 1800s, including the yellow brick road representing the much-discussed gold standard of that age, the scarecrow representing the then-hot Populist Party, Toto representing the teetotaler [prohibitionist:] movement, and a lot more.) But of course, there are a couple of details about this book that have been forgotten over the decades too, which also help explain its record-shattering success -- it was an unusually lavish book for its time, for example, with two-toned illustrations on every page and several full-color plates, and let's also not forget that Baum himself mounted a Broadway-style musical of Oz just two years after the book was published, a huge hit which toured nationally for a decade and that was even more insanely popular than the book itself (including making national stars out of vaudeville performers Fred Stone and David Montgomery, playing the Scarecrow and Tin Man; the stage production left out the Cowardly Lion altogether, which is why he is also barely seen in any of the 13 canonical sequels). And so that's why when Baum attempted starting up other fantasy series in the wake of Oz's success, hoping to turn all of them into lucrative franchises like the original, the audience mostly responded with yawns; and that's why Baum eventually went back to writing more and more Oz books as the 20th century continued, because by now the strength of the brand far outweighed the relative writing skills of Baum when it came to any particular volume. That's why, at least to adults, it's perhaps actually the introductions to each book that are the most fascinating thing about them; because to be frank, most of the books follow a pretty familiar formula, with a danger-filled quest involving various kooky characters that is usually finished about two-thirds of the way through, followed by a massive parade or party that lets Baum trot out the growing number of main characters added to this universe with each title. (And by the way, prepare yourself for Baum's unending love of the deus-ex-machina plot device; over half the books end along the lines of, "And then our heroes took possession of a super-duper magical device, which they waved in the air and all their troubles went away.") In fact, for those who don't know, that's why the official map of Oz and its surrounding lands eventually grew so large, because Baum still hadn't given up on his dream of having a whole series of kid-lit cash cows out there generating revenue for him, and so would use many of these Oz sequels to introduce entirely new casts of characters who live in entirely new lands, "just over the mountains" or "just past the desert" of Oz itself. By the end of the original 14 books, in fact, Baum had built up a virtual aristocracy of licensable characters, all of whom would have to be dragged out for a cameo at some point in each book to remind the audience of their existence -- not just the cast of the original book and '39 movie but also various other princesses like Ozma and Betsy Bobbin, boy characters like Ojo the Unlucky and Button Bright, adults who help them like the Shaggy Man, Cap'n Bill and Ugu the Shoemaker, and of course a whole litany of quirky fantastical sidekicks, including but not limited to Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Great Jinjin, Billina the Angry Hen, Scraps the Patchwork Girl, and Polychrome the Rainbow Fairy. Whew! And so did the Great Oz Merchandising Experiment keep limping along for two decades, with each sequel selling less and less and getting lazier and lazier (for example, the tenth book in the series, 1916's Rinkitink in Oz, was actually a non-Oz book written a decade previous, published almost unchanged except for a hasty final chapter full of Oz regulars slapped onto the end); and thus did Baum's bad luck in business come back with a vengeance as well, with three more Broadway productions that were all flops, and even the establishment of a film production company in 1914 that eventually went bankrupt. You can see the progression of all this reflected in Baum's first-person introductions to each book, which like I said is why they might be the most fascinating parts of all for adult readers -- how in the first sequel, for example, he expresses legitimately gleeful surprise and joy at how passionate his fans were, and how thousands of children had literally written to him out of the blue demanding more Oz stories, while with each subsequent sequel his tone becomes more and more snarky, ala "Well, dear and wonderful children, you've yet again demanded another Oz book like the sheep you are, so here it is, you screeching little monsters." In fact, in book six of the series, 1910's The Emerald City of Oz, Baum flat-out states that it's going to be the very last Oz book, and it's no coincidence that many fans actually consider this one to be the best of the original fourteen, because of Baum's extra attention to and enthusiasm for this particular storyline, thinking as he erroneously did that it would be the grand finale of the entire Oz universe; but after his later financial failures forced him back into the Oz business again, the gloves finally come off in his introductions, with most of the rest sounding to today's ears something like, "Well, okay, here again is the sugary teat you all apparently can't get enough of suckling, you infuriating little animals, so open wide and take your medicine." Now, of course, you shouldn't feel too bad for Baum; by the last years of his life, his combined books and plays were generating for him in today's terms roughly a quarter-million dollars a year just in personal royalties. So all in all, an experience I'm glad I had, reading all fourteen original Oz books in a row, but not something I'd recommend to others; instead, maybe better just to read the first, then skip to the sixth, then skip straight to the 14th, 1920's Glinda of Oz, because of its unusual darkness (probably caused, many scholars agree, by Baum knowing that he was near death). As with many authors I've looked at here at CCLaP, history seems to have correctly adjusted itself in Baum's case, with most of his books now rightfully falling into the obscurity they deserve, even while his one true masterpiece is still rightfully recognized as such.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bob Newman

    Magic Heist Sparks Safari !! This volume of the wonderful Oz stories is classic Baum, but perhaps not at his best. Still, fans will not want to miss the further adventures of Dorothy, the Wizard, and many other old characters, including the Cowardly Lion. The Scarecrow and Tin Woodman take a back seat. Ozma has been kidnapped along with her Magic Picture. The Wizard's wizardly gear has been ripped off, and a midnight break-in has robbed Glinda of her Book of Records plus her whole magic lab. Wha Magic Heist Sparks Safari !! This volume of the wonderful Oz stories is classic Baum, but perhaps not at his best. Still, fans will not want to miss the further adventures of Dorothy, the Wizard, and many other old characters, including the Cowardly Lion. The Scarecrow and Tin Woodman take a back seat. Ozma has been kidnapped along with her Magic Picture. The Wizard's wizardly gear has been ripped off, and a midnight break-in has robbed Glinda of her Book of Records plus her whole magic lab. What to do ? The usual (deus ex machina)ways of locating baddies are kaput, so various parties set off in search of Ozma. At the same time, in (another) remote corner of the magic monarchy, a cookie maker and an extremely large and well-dressed frog leave home in search of a golden dishpan that produces the best cookies ever. It has other, unknown abilities as well. The book develops into another Oz road movie complete with numerous weird peoples in odd towns. Lavender teddy bear king, whirling hills. This volume tried to include too many of the Oz-ites, like Betsy Bobbin and Trot, whose presence is almost negligible. I must admit that I still love these stories, even if Baum's earnest moralizing and inevitable girl armies bother an old geezer like me. If you are just entering the world of Oz, I recommend "The Land of Oz", "Ozma of Oz", "The Emerald City of Oz", "The Scarecrow of Oz", "The Tin Woodman of Oz" and "Glinda of Oz" as the best of what, anyway, is one of the greatest series of kids' books ever. The original "Wizard" is of course a classic of world children's literature.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    Definitely was better than most the Oz books, but I don't think any of them deserve more than 3 stars! just because it was better compared to the previous books in the series does not (1.) Make L. Frank Baum a better writer (2.) Mean this book Succeeded in holding a more complicated plot or (3.) mean he ended yet another book with an awfully convenient item that wraps everything up perfectly. I couldn't help but think throughout this book that as a toddler I would have loved to hear this story r Definitely was better than most the Oz books, but I don't think any of them deserve more than 3 stars! just because it was better compared to the previous books in the series does not (1.) Make L. Frank Baum a better writer (2.) Mean this book Succeeded in holding a more complicated plot or (3.) mean he ended yet another book with an awfully convenient item that wraps everything up perfectly. I couldn't help but think throughout this book that as a toddler I would have loved to hear this story read out loud to me. Baum's imagination outshines his writing skills by a lot. If you are looking for a nice, simple bedtime story to read to your children I couldn't recommend this series enough, but to anyone else it might just be a waste of time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    I’ll take credit for the genius move to delay continuing the Oz series for a number of months. Baum sticks once again to his journey-with-the-introduction-of-wacky-new-characters formula. The pause helped make his lack of creativity more bearable. The kiddos liked the Frogman. I found Cayke the Cookie Cook’s insistence on finding her baking pan annoying. A challenge for you - try saying “Cayke the Cookie Cook” quickly and repeatedly. I tongue-tripped over the name more than once.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Ricker

    Whatever will the Ozites do when their lovely girl ruler is kidnapped? Wander around until they manage to find out who took her, basically, in yet another excuse for Baum to explore new Oz geography. One wonders just how big this country is. I wasn't wild about the frog and the cookie cook subplot, but the tiny pink bear was great.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    This was one of the better stories in the series. When Ozma and all the magic disappears, everyone teams together to find it. We meet 2 new characters who meet up with them, coming from the opposite direction. The part I liked the most, is how each person had a part to play in using their talents to defeat the thief. It didn't all lay on one person.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Coffin

    "To be really lovely one must be beautiful without and within." Princess Ozma is missing: so we go on another Ozian adventure. We get to see a whole new host of magical citizens, travel the breadth of Oz to track down Ozma and the missing magical artifacts. Another cute Wizard of Oz edition.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gloriamarie

    I remember how absolutely delighted I was a child to discover that there were lots and lots of Oz books. I have turned to them for a comfort read and they still delight me. I remember how worried I was. Would Ozma be found safe and unharmed?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Juanita

    Not really a review, but I read this book because there were multiple references to it in a staged reading of "Love Letters" that I was a part of earlier this year. I had to find out why my character was referred to as looking like The Lost Princess of Oz.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Thankfully this story featured familiar characters. This story was a nice classic adventure story. It introduced a few characters but who ultimately made the adventure more interested and well rounded. I hope the remaining stories are as well thought out as one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ira Livingston

    Aside from the original book that started the series, this by far is my favorite. The plot is actually original, plausible, and real enough without Baum's typical embellishments to add quirky new characters. Fantastic read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    MCK

    I've been enjoying the series, given what they are, however, this particular book was more enjoyable than 2-10. Baum wrote this as more of a mystery, which made it interesting. At the end, I forehead slapped myself for forgetting a key element... doh!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lauren LaTulip

    Cast of thousands, but one of the better Oz stories, a good fantasy adventure, with bits of humour. I love the page size and type layout of my 1917 edition. Of course the illustrations are the highlight with John R Neill particularly dedicating himself to the Frogman.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Greg Snow

    An enjoyable children's tale that introduced yet more interesting characters from the land of Oz.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    So far this is the Oz book that most closely resembles a story with a structured plot.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    *3.5

  29. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    Read this aloud with my daughter at bedtime. She enjoyed the mystery of it a lot and laughed pretty much every time I said "Cayke the Cookie Cook".

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Well written and delightful

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