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Resistance

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Chaya Lindner is a teenager living in Nazi-occupied Poland. Simply being Jewish places her in danger of being killed or sent to the camps. After her little sister is taken away, her younger brother disappears, and her parents all but give up hope, Chaya is determined to make a difference. Using forged papers and her fair features, Chaya becomes a courier and travels betwee Chaya Lindner is a teenager living in Nazi-occupied Poland. Simply being Jewish places her in danger of being killed or sent to the camps. After her little sister is taken away, her younger brother disappears, and her parents all but give up hope, Chaya is determined to make a difference. Using forged papers and her fair features, Chaya becomes a courier and travels between the Jewish ghettos of Poland, smuggling food, papers, and even people. Soon Chaya joins a resistance cell that runs raids on the Nazis' supplies. But after a mission goes terribly wrong, Chaya's network shatters. She is alone and unsure of where to go, until Esther, a member of her cell, finds her and delivers a message that chills Chaya to her core, and sends her on a journey toward an even larger uprising in the works — in the Warsaw Ghetto. Though the Jewish resistance never had much of a chance against the Nazis, they were determined to save as many lives as possible, and to live — or die — with honor.


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Chaya Lindner is a teenager living in Nazi-occupied Poland. Simply being Jewish places her in danger of being killed or sent to the camps. After her little sister is taken away, her younger brother disappears, and her parents all but give up hope, Chaya is determined to make a difference. Using forged papers and her fair features, Chaya becomes a courier and travels betwee Chaya Lindner is a teenager living in Nazi-occupied Poland. Simply being Jewish places her in danger of being killed or sent to the camps. After her little sister is taken away, her younger brother disappears, and her parents all but give up hope, Chaya is determined to make a difference. Using forged papers and her fair features, Chaya becomes a courier and travels between the Jewish ghettos of Poland, smuggling food, papers, and even people. Soon Chaya joins a resistance cell that runs raids on the Nazis' supplies. But after a mission goes terribly wrong, Chaya's network shatters. She is alone and unsure of where to go, until Esther, a member of her cell, finds her and delivers a message that chills Chaya to her core, and sends her on a journey toward an even larger uprising in the works — in the Warsaw Ghetto. Though the Jewish resistance never had much of a chance against the Nazis, they were determined to save as many lives as possible, and to live — or die — with honor.

30 review for Resistance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    Holy. Crap. This book completely took my breath away. It may be Nielsen's best, and I'm someone who swears by "The False Prince." An incredible look at the work of Jewish resistance fighters during the Holocaust, "Resistance" pulls no punches - there is no sugar-coating of the atrocities committed by the Nazis, and the atmosphere of terror, suspicion, and desperation. And yet, this book is filled with hope, and pride, friendship and love. It's honestly incredible that a story featuring such a da Holy. Crap. This book completely took my breath away. It may be Nielsen's best, and I'm someone who swears by "The False Prince." An incredible look at the work of Jewish resistance fighters during the Holocaust, "Resistance" pulls no punches - there is no sugar-coating of the atrocities committed by the Nazis, and the atmosphere of terror, suspicion, and desperation. And yet, this book is filled with hope, and pride, friendship and love. It's honestly incredible that a story featuring such a dark time has so much care and feeling. And, my favorite, Nielsen manages to capture the pride and connectedness of the Jewish people. Chaya is fueled by the idea of saving as many of her people as she can. Others cling to their faith, finding solace in that and their people in the face of inhumane savagery. This book is a genuine gem, and I hope it gets the recognition it deserves, and makes its way into curriculums and classrooms.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mikayla

    I was very excited to be the first to get this from my library only a few days after it released. I love the point of view this book took. I loved zooming into the eyes of Chaya, seeing how hard it would be to watch her world crumbling out from beneath her. The loneliness that was portrayed was so deep rooted I felt it for the characters. I rooted for them all and was hit by the realistic flow of relationships. I was on the edge of my seat through the last part and feared for all the characters I was very excited to be the first to get this from my library only a few days after it released. I love the point of view this book took. I loved zooming into the eyes of Chaya, seeing how hard it would be to watch her world crumbling out from beneath her. The loneliness that was portrayed was so deep rooted I felt it for the characters. I rooted for them all and was hit by the realistic flow of relationships. I was on the edge of my seat through the last part and feared for all the characters lives. The only thing that I didn't like was Chaya's rather apathetic view on her beliefs. She is standing for the Jews, but she doesn't really care about her faith. I was expecting this from a secular author, but it was still sad to watch her just brush off everything with a "God will understand." That conclusion was bittersweet but really good. Overall, a very good book, but a little weak in her faith.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Seshat

    "All people are equal brothers; Brown, White, Black and Yellow. To separate peoples, colors, races, Is but an act of cheating!" (Also on my blog ) I just finished this book, and I still feel overwhelmed (there will be typos). Resistance is about the final stand of many Polish Jewish resistors as they refused to be swept away by the final solution without a fight. I’ve read a lot of books about “Aryan” or Polish rescuers, and Jewish survival, I’ve read about fighting for your country, and your be "All people are equal brothers; Brown, White, Black and Yellow. To separate peoples, colors, races, Is but an act of cheating!" (Also on my blog ) I just finished this book, and I still feel overwhelmed (there will be typos). Resistance is about the final stand of many Polish Jewish resistors as they refused to be swept away by the final solution without a fight. I’ve read a lot of books about “Aryan” or Polish rescuers, and Jewish survival, I’ve read about fighting for your country, and your beliefs, but there is a unique twinge to Resistance— in it’s futility. “Even I found myself smiling more than usual, sometimes laughing as I worked among other resistance members. And eventually, I understood why. It was because the ending our story was already written.” This book changed the way I thought about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, and the way I think about victory. “Ultimately, the Warsaw Ghetto fighters held out longer than the entire country of Poland did against the initial German invasion.” Chaya is a teenage Jewish girl who’s radiant youth and been destroyed by not just the war, but by facing the brunt of discrimination. From the Nazis and her countrymen alike, her innocence is ripped away as she discovers that the people who used to show her respect, kindness, walk the streets with her, travel in the same train cars, now spurned them and surrendered her people to the Nazi’s monstrosity. She is confronted with force of the most nefarious hate that world perhaps has ever scene and turns her convictions to resistance, not in the hopes of victory over the invaders, but the impenetrable wall of death. This book does more than show the dangers of resististing Nazism, but the near hopelessness of it. Success for these Jewish rebels becomes not about dispelling the German forces, but spitting in the face of evil. That to me made reading this book very special— the tone echos the rage of one kind hearted Jewish girl, who just wanted to live a good life with her family. “I wanted to tell her everything if the world would only give me a chance.” This book is hard, no denying it. But it also is strangely satisfying. The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, which before I had only regarded with pity at a failed resistance attempt, now seems superhumanly heroic. Resistance more than the story of good, but the story of strength. It doesn’t fall back on the old “Love is stronger than hate” motif, which naïvly implies a guarantee of morality, but asserts a rallying cry. If we want love to be stronger than hate, we must make it that way. “It was a reminder that hatred runs deeper and wider than a single race or nationality, and if love was not stronger, hated would run through the generations. I intended to be stronger.” Just typing this sends a surge of emotion through me. That passage summarizes so much why books like this touch me so deeply. Of course I loved this book; there were moments in the story I sometimes found cliche and plot twists I thought too manufactured, but the driving message through this book overruled all of that. I particularly appreciated the homage to the historical Jewish heroes; I’ve always held a special reverence for Mordechai Anielewicz and Mira Fuchrer and it’s wonderful to finally see them eulogized. Spoiler Discussion(view spoiler)[. Chaya’s convictions and conflicts were so interesting read through, especially as she develops her relationship with Esther. What was so remarkable to me was how Chaya refused to succumb to hate in either the Poles or the Germans. At every German soldier she was lie to, steal from, or attack she wonders what kind of man he was, a murderer or innocent. She states repeatedly she believes in the good and bad in both the Germans and Poles. This might have been an uncharacteristic decision by the author to make her more sympathetic, but it seems to fit in well with her outlook and theme of the book. “German blood. At long last, the blood spilled in the ghettos is not from the Jews.” She was right, but I couldn’t cheer for that either. I wanted a world in which no blood must be spilled. A world free of hatred that made a fight such as this necessary.” This book constantly debates the ways this must be achieved, “The war will end one day and the Germans will go back to their own land. But here we must live alongside thousands of people like that man. If we can’t stop his hatred, this will happen again and again and again!” “‘I wonder if this will ever end.’ ‘The war?’ ‘The hatred’... ‘maybe when the world opens its eyes to what had been done to us, they will realize how destructive hate can be.’ ‘Maybe. But they’ll forget again, in time. And when they forget, this will all start once more.’” That was a long passage, but I find myself agreeing with Esther’s cynicism more than Chaya’s hope. The Holocaust was not the last genocide to happen, there’s been nearly a century of Rwanda, Bosnia, Kurdish, Yazidis, Guatemalan, Khmer Rouge, the US backed Indonesian Killings, the Holodomor, and even the Rohingya and Darfur conflicts that are ongoing today. But books like Resistance do offer some hope in the empathetic power of stories, “Every story will matter. When they remember our stories, they will forget their hatred.”. (hide spoiler)]

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I enjoyed this a lot. It's not a take I've read in fiction before and because the main character's a courier, we really get to see the situation in different areas of Poland. I appreciated the emphasis on family and friendship over romance because these aren't exactly romantic situations. There is some mixed info on if this is MG or YA, so to clarify: the MC is 16. There's only the tiniest hints at a romance. There's a lot of violence and death and being brutally honest about situations. So....I I enjoyed this a lot. It's not a take I've read in fiction before and because the main character's a courier, we really get to see the situation in different areas of Poland. I appreciated the emphasis on family and friendship over romance because these aren't exactly romantic situations. There is some mixed info on if this is MG or YA, so to clarify: the MC is 16. There's only the tiniest hints at a romance. There's a lot of violence and death and being brutally honest about situations. So....I'd be careful about which pre-teens you'd hand this to.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus After Chaya's brother and sister fall victim to the Nazis in the Tarnow Ghetto in Poland in 1942, her parents resign themselves to their fate. Chaya, however, decides to go down fighting and joins a Resistance group called Akiva. This group is comprised of former leaders and children in a scouting group. At first, she is a courier, taking food and sometimes weapons into the ghetto. She is does not "look Jewish" with her fair hair, so it is somewhat easier for her to move E ARC from Edelweiss Plus After Chaya's brother and sister fall victim to the Nazis in the Tarnow Ghetto in Poland in 1942, her parents resign themselves to their fate. Chaya, however, decides to go down fighting and joins a Resistance group called Akiva. This group is comprised of former leaders and children in a scouting group. At first, she is a courier, taking food and sometimes weapons into the ghetto. She is does not "look Jewish" with her fair hair, so it is somewhat easier for her to move around with her forged papers claiming she is Helena Nowak. It is not so easy for Esther, a timid girl who joins the group. Eventually, realizing the that situation in Poland is getting worse and worse, the group starts to plan sabotage activities, including bombing a cafe. After that, Akiva sustains may casualties, and Chaya fears she is the only one left. She starts out on her own and eventually runs into Esther, who claims she is on a mission from a former Akiva leader to deliver items to the Lodz ghetto. Things are exceedingly grim when they get there, but the girls decide to travel on to Warsaw. Along the way, they find some of their former cohorts who are trying to get more Resistance members to help in whatever way they can. It is clear that the Resistance is not going to "win", but the hope is that the Nazis can be slowed down, and that some lives can be saved. Chaya and Esther eventually end up taking part in the particularly brutal fighting in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Chaya becomes badly injured, but still tries her best to do the right thing in the face of evil. Strengths: Nielsen is one of the best writers of fight scenes in middle grade literature today. They are my favorite thing, but many young readers like the excitement and adrenalin they provide. Nielsen has great attention to detail, with sights, sounds, and movement in these scenes. She doesn't neglect the more niggling, scrounging aspects of survival either, with details about clothing, food, and the desperate measures people were driven to to survive. There's a bit of philosophy thrown in from time to time (why just die when you could make a difference, if you know that death is inevitable?), as well as politics and history concerning the was as it affected Poland. Another fantastic book to have about World War II, and a nice mix of fighting (which has die-hard fans) and tie-ins with the Holocaust (required reading for my 8th graders). Weaknesses: This has a ton of information and detail. There were a couple of times when I had to stop and figure out what was going on, and I have read fairly widely about WWII. Because of this, Resistance isn't a great first book about the Holocaust to hand to readers who know nothing about it, but it will be popular with readers who have a decent background knowledge. What I really think: Definitely purchasing. Love the cover.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie Kirchner

    I had heard so many great things about this book from friends, and I loved A Night Divided, so I was excited to see the ARC on the swag table at NErDCampMI! I didn’t have to think twice about what to choose! This is a HF novel that takes place in Poland during WWII. I’m always interested in reading about this time period as my father served in the war and I feel like I know more about this war than other wars, yet I’m always learning more. This book was no different. It is the story of Chaya, a J I had heard so many great things about this book from friends, and I loved A Night Divided, so I was excited to see the ARC on the swag table at NErDCampMI! I didn’t have to think twice about what to choose! This is a HF novel that takes place in Poland during WWII. I’m always interested in reading about this time period as my father served in the war and I feel like I know more about this war than other wars, yet I’m always learning more. This book was no different. It is the story of Chaya, a Jewish teenager passing as a Christian courier able to smuggle food, documents, weapons and even people in and out of the Jewish ghettos. The story features actual events that happened during the Jewish Resistance in a fictional story. There is suspense along the way that made it challenging to stop reading. It is heartbreaking to read about the harsh realities faced by the Jewish families, but it also serves as an important reminder that we must stand up and speak out when atrocities such as these happen. This will be a book I will definitely hand off to my older students who are interested in WWII history. It will show them another angle of the war that hasn’t been addressed as often in middle grade books. The author has included great back matter on actual heroes from the resistance movement, too! Favorite quotes: “We’ll all die one day, no one escapes that fate. Our only decision is how we live before that day comes. Our path requires courage, but so does theirs. Both paths are ways to resist.” “It was a reminder that hatred runs deeper and wider than a single race or nationality, and if love was not stronger, hatred would run through the generations. I intended to be stronger.” And in the author’s note: “Love is the resistance.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    HazelNut

    Wow. This one was a powerful read. This book definitely had a more solemn tone to it than others of Ms. Nielsen's books, including A Night Divided. But it had to be that way, and in all honesty, the story ended with much more hope than I thought it would initially. Learning more about the history of the Jewish resistance was intriguing as well as heartbreaking. Well worth reading.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane Shea

    Jennifer Nielsen has a way with telling historical fiction that I enjoy and admire! She does such good research that I get pulled into the story and NEED to know the ending. Resistance is no different! A story about a young girl who finds her own courage and desperate need to make life better for her Jewish people during WWII in Poland, this book is in a league of it's own. Told with heart-wrenching realism and as much fact as possible, the characters are people readers will grow to love and roo Jennifer Nielsen has a way with telling historical fiction that I enjoy and admire! She does such good research that I get pulled into the story and NEED to know the ending. Resistance is no different! A story about a young girl who finds her own courage and desperate need to make life better for her Jewish people during WWII in Poland, this book is in a league of it's own. Told with heart-wrenching realism and as much fact as possible, the characters are people readers will grow to love and root for at all costs. This book was sent to me through a Goodreads Giveaway.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Video review to come.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tirzah

    *This is a review on an Advanced Reader Copy I won through the author's contest.* Reading historical fiction based on the Holocaust is never easy. Someone commented on how I often read books on that subject and it led me to ask myself why? While it always saddens me to read about the suffering and cruelty, it always leaves me in admiration of the countless people whose love, faith, and courage persevered during that dark time. Writing historical fiction based on the Holocaust has to be difficult. *This is a review on an Advanced Reader Copy I won through the author's contest.* Reading historical fiction based on the Holocaust is never easy. Someone commented on how I often read books on that subject and it led me to ask myself why? While it always saddens me to read about the suffering and cruelty, it always leaves me in admiration of the countless people whose love, faith, and courage persevered during that dark time. Writing historical fiction based on the Holocaust has to be difficult. Author Jennifer Nielsen showed her talent to effectively research and write historical fiction in her 2015 A Night Divided. She does the same wonderful job with Resistance. Readers will immediately be swept up in the story of Chaya, a brave Jewish courier for a resistance group. There are horrors, injustices, and grief as can only be expected in books such as these; however, there are great moments of love, loyalty, sacrifice, and the list goes on. Evil will always be in this world, but so will love and love will always win – even if it doesn’t feel or look like it did. This message is clearly told throughout the book. As with other similar books I have read, Resistance will stay with me for some time. I highly recommend to history fans, approx. 8th grade+.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cornmaven

    Received an ARC of this at a conference. As an avid reader of WWII historical fiction, I appreciated this tale of Jewish Resistance fighters in Poland, with the main character Chaya moving through various city ghettos, culminating in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Within the story there is a lot of information about the evolution of the Final Solution, how difficult it was to mount any kind of resistance, and the bravery of anyone that did. What I could not get used to was Chaya's "voice". I found h Received an ARC of this at a conference. As an avid reader of WWII historical fiction, I appreciated this tale of Jewish Resistance fighters in Poland, with the main character Chaya moving through various city ghettos, culminating in the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Within the story there is a lot of information about the evolution of the Final Solution, how difficult it was to mount any kind of resistance, and the bravery of anyone that did. What I could not get used to was Chaya's "voice". I found her way too wordy as she made her way through this horrific life. I could see it as a device to impart the facts about the Holocaust, as well as a teen girl's approach to it (she is still a teen after all). But for me it diluted the power of the story. There were a few exciting moments, but then I felt it would go to calm as Chaya worked her way through it. Maybe it's just me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Stafinski

    I really, really liked this book! I'm trying to venture away from mostly reading YA, and this is categorized as being "middle-grade" at my library. Although, honestly, I thought it definitely leaned more towards YA. I wouldn't say it's graphic, but Nielsen doesn't shy away from the grittier aspects of what was really happening during the Holocaust. There were a few parts that were hard to read, just because you know this is all based on real experiences people were having. Families being ripped I really, really liked this book! I'm trying to venture away from mostly reading YA, and this is categorized as being "middle-grade" at my library. Although, honestly, I thought it definitely leaned more towards YA. I wouldn't say it's graphic, but Nielsen doesn't shy away from the grittier aspects of what was really happening during the Holocaust. There were a few parts that were hard to read, just because you know this is all based on real experiences people were having. Families being ripped a part, children put on trains and taken away from their parents, ghettos where the living conditions were inhumane and unbearable. Not to mention the cold, callousness of the German soldiers. Jews weren't treated like human beings. The author does not sugarcoat this, and I appreciate that. What went on during WWII was absolutely horrible, and we should never, ever let ourselves forget about the suffering that went on. So yes-- there was death, there was violence. But that shouldn't stop you from reading this. The main character, Chaya, is a sixteen year old girl living in a German-occupied Poland during WWII. She works as a courier for the Jewish resistance, which means her job is to sneak in and out of the ghettos to provide whatever help she can to the people living there. Something that's very, very dangerous but she's able to do because she looks more Polish than Jewish. Her own family is separated, and it's really heartbreaking to read about how her parents slowly began to lose hope and their will to survive. At one point, something happens that also tears apart the members of Chaya's resistance unit. She's forced to flee with one other member, a girl named Esther that she's not too thrilled about being stuck with. Anyways, I flew through the entire second half in about two hours. The beginning is a little slow to build up, but then everything goes from 0-100 real quick. The very end takes place during the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, and it was impossible to stop reading. There are some loose threads that never really get tied up, and questions we never get answers to, but I think that's probably fairly realistic considering what was happening. Definitely recommend, even if you're normally not a reader of historical fiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Iden

    In many ways, this book was awesome. Jewish resistance fighters! Kids! Accurate descriptions of how little help the Allied forces were when atrocities were being committed against Jews and they described zero Jewish refugees as "too many!" But something felt off to me. Maybe it's because I was raised Jewish, but I didn't find this book particularly Jewish. The mentions of the Shema seemed like they were written by an outsider (perhaps because I've only heard it as the Shema and not the Shema Yisr In many ways, this book was awesome. Jewish resistance fighters! Kids! Accurate descriptions of how little help the Allied forces were when atrocities were being committed against Jews and they described zero Jewish refugees as "too many!" But something felt off to me. Maybe it's because I was raised Jewish, but I didn't find this book particularly Jewish. The mentions of the Shema seemed like they were written by an outsider (perhaps because I've only heard it as the Shema and not the Shema Yisrael as Nielsen writes). The Shema is also almost always sung and, though the tune was in my head whenever I heard it mentioned, I don't know if Nielsen meant all of the iterations to be sung. The frequent mention of a meal as The Last Supper was cute, but an obviously Christian reference point. To use that term without any nod to the fact that Jews don't really care about the Last Supper felt like an oversight. It was also odd that Yiddish was mentioned often, but rarely if ever included. I will also admit: I'm scared that people will read this book and look down upon those who were killed without a fight. I have relatives who died at the hands of civilians during peak anti-Semitism in Europe. I'm sure I have relatives who died by Nazi hands. I'm happy to see a book with so many Jewish characters with agency, but I don't want to think of my ancestors as any less brave because they didn't become Akiva resistance fighters.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Celia McMahon

    Bravo! That is the one word I thought to use after I finished this amazing novel. Bravo. This story follows Chaya who, after her family is split apart during the war, decides to use her job as a courier (adopting a Polish persona) and joins a Jewish resistance group called Akiva. The story skirts along actual events that took place in several ghettos throughout Poland. After a semi-botched event, Chaya is separated from her group, only to find that one is left and that their mission has become mo Bravo! That is the one word I thought to use after I finished this amazing novel. Bravo. This story follows Chaya who, after her family is split apart during the war, decides to use her job as a courier (adopting a Polish persona) and joins a Jewish resistance group called Akiva. The story skirts along actual events that took place in several ghettos throughout Poland. After a semi-botched event, Chaya is separated from her group, only to find that one is left and that their mission has become more dire and important than she ever imagined. As I said before, this story centers around actual events and actual people like Chaya and those we are introduced to in a fictional and nonfictional sense. Chaya is courageous in every sense. She stands for every brave soul who fought for their freedom. Those whose stories we don't know. She had her share of heartache, but rises above it. She knows she cannot save everyone, but even just one life would be worth it to her. She is probably the most heroic protagonist I have ever read about I swept up by this story, its nonstop action, and tension. This is one of those books that will stick with me. I will also probably buy it for anyone who doesn't already own it whom I think will enjoy it as much as I did. Bravo, Jennifer. This get s rare five stars from me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie P

    I love this cover and think it represents the book so well with the image of a young girl ready to take on an army knowing there is not much chance of success, but that it's important to fight the evil anyway. This story was emotionally poignant, full of suspense, thought provoking with difficult moral questions and dilemmas, and filled with compelling character development. As to be expected, there are many heart breaking aspects and the book shows how cruel people can be. But the most emotional I love this cover and think it represents the book so well with the image of a young girl ready to take on an army knowing there is not much chance of success, but that it's important to fight the evil anyway. This story was emotionally poignant, full of suspense, thought provoking with difficult moral questions and dilemmas, and filled with compelling character development. As to be expected, there are many heart breaking aspects and the book shows how cruel people can be. But the most emotional parts for me were actually seeing the strength and goodness of people as they stood up for right and selflessly helped others. The book does not sugar coat the awful things that happened, but I thought it always maintained a sense of hope and strength and it never felt dark or depressing. I have read SO many books set during World War II, but I don't think I've ever read anything that focuses on the Jewish resistance. I loved that new perspective and seeing the strength of the Jews that decided to rally together and fight the evil. This is a book and all the thoughts and feelings it brought to mind will stay with me for some time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carli

    Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network and @scholasticinc for the advance copy of this 8.28.18 release. All opinions are my own. #partner • This is a piece of historical fiction that is bound to be super popular with middle school readers. After her family is split up, Chaya is a courier for the a cell of the Jewish resistance in Poland during WWII. After a mission goes wrong Chaya finds herself alone until her least favorite person from her network, Esther, shows up with cryptic instructions to Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network and @scholasticinc for the advance copy of this 8.28.18 release. All opinions are my own. #partner • This is a piece of historical fiction that is bound to be super popular with middle school readers. After her family is split up, Chaya is a courier for the a cell of the Jewish resistance in Poland during WWII. After a mission goes wrong Chaya finds herself alone until her least favorite person from her network, Esther, shows up with cryptic instructions to go to the Warsaw ghetto for a rumored uprising. Though the resistance doesn’t seem to have much of a chance, they know they must fight, whether they live or die. • I don’t know about you guys, but Jennifer A. Nielsen is one of the top circulating authors in my library. I was SO excited to get a chance to read this one early and will definitely be buying multiple copies. I did feel that is dragged a bit in the middle, but I still enjoyed it tremendously. Recommended for readers in grades 6+ ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    There is so much depth in this historical fiction novel. You can always count on Jennifer to open with a hook that dares you to just TRY not reading on to find out more. She's a master at it! Set against the backdrop of a terrible part of our world's history, this story tells the story of teens that stood up in the face of hatred, determined to make a difference even if it costs them their lives. Based on the true experience of Jewish teenagers, the character development is a strength of this st There is so much depth in this historical fiction novel. You can always count on Jennifer to open with a hook that dares you to just TRY not reading on to find out more. She's a master at it! Set against the backdrop of a terrible part of our world's history, this story tells the story of teens that stood up in the face of hatred, determined to make a difference even if it costs them their lives. Based on the true experience of Jewish teenagers, the character development is a strength of this story. I appreciate the respect Jennifer shows for readers, as she unravels the story in a way that gives space for truly feeling the emotions of the events these teens are encountering. This well researched story is one that should be included in all middle school classrooms and school libraries.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I heard Jennifer A. Nielsen speak about the true story behind her new novel, RESISTANCE, at the National Book Festival last weekend. The things she said were so interesting that I knew I had to read this book. And I'm glad I did. Starring Chaya, a fearless teenage heroine, the tale is full of tension and heart-pounding action. It's more plot-driven than character-driven, which disappointed me a little. I wanted to feel like I really knew Chaya and I wanted to see her grow over the course of the I heard Jennifer A. Nielsen speak about the true story behind her new novel, RESISTANCE, at the National Book Festival last weekend. The things she said were so interesting that I knew I had to read this book. And I'm glad I did. Starring Chaya, a fearless teenage heroine, the tale is full of tension and heart-pounding action. It's more plot-driven than character-driven, which disappointed me a little. I wanted to feel like I really knew Chaya and I wanted to see her grow over the course of the novel, which didn't really happen. Still, I enjoyed this book about a fascinating period in history. Like I did, I think teen readers will find it both instructive and engrossing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Chaya was just a teenager in Poland when the war broke out. She was Jewish. Her family was forced into the Krakow ghetto, and she was sent elsewhere. She immediately joined up with the resistance and became a courier, bringing information, food, weapons, and supplies to those trapped in the ghettos. She also smuggled out many Jews to safety. We follow Chaya as she completes her missions, ultimately following her to the Warsaw ghetto uprising. This book gives insight into the resistance, their ro Chaya was just a teenager in Poland when the war broke out. She was Jewish. Her family was forced into the Krakow ghetto, and she was sent elsewhere. She immediately joined up with the resistance and became a courier, bringing information, food, weapons, and supplies to those trapped in the ghettos. She also smuggled out many Jews to safety. We follow Chaya as she completes her missions, ultimately following her to the Warsaw ghetto uprising. This book gives insight into the resistance, their role in the war and uprising, and also a glimpse into why some stood up for what was right, while others stood by. A MUST read!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kim Clifton

    I’m so glad Jennifer Nielsen is taking on historical fiction. Now when we’re reading Night and my students ask about uprisings, I can hand them this book instead of a Wikipedia page. I especially appreciated how Chaya (and Nielsen, more directly, but who reads author’s notes?) emphasizes how resistance is a choice she makes, but not a standard by which she can judge other victims.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Parker

    this book brings up a lot of emotions. It is a really good book and at multiple points brought tears to my eyes. It is a really hard book to read personally, but all and all a really good book. but it isn't for everyone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Staci

    A very good book! Great job Jennifer Nielsen!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Garland

    I have not met a Jennifer Nielsen book I did not like or devour and this one is no exception.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Excellent as always!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Damn.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Received an ARC at nErDcampmi, and I’m so grateful! The intensity of the plot from the very beginning kept me engaged and nervous about what would happen to Nielsen’s main character! This book is a must read for middle school classrooms and beyond.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    Read my review at Bookish Adventures.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    Jennifer Nielsen continues to write books that amaze, teach and help me grow. Another book about WWII that gives me new understanding about the fight the Jewish people took on and the meaning of resistance.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Patti Sabik

    I couldn’t tear myself away from this book. It was an edge of your seat nail-biter from the first page. Anyone who has read Nielsen’s “A Night Divided” will devour this story about the Jewish Resistance in Poland in WWII.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jaina Rose

    This review and many more like it are available on Read Till Dawn . Wow. Just, wow. I mean, I've been a fan of Nielsen's for ages, and I adored her East Berlin book A Night Divided, so I knew going in that I was going to love Resistance. But I had no idea how blown away by it I was going to be. World War II is pretty well-trodden ground by this point, but Nielsen still managed to find an aspect–the Jewish resistance movement–that I didn't know anything about. I never knew that the Jews worked so h This review and many more like it are available on Read Till Dawn . Wow. Just, wow. I mean, I've been a fan of Nielsen's for ages, and I adored her East Berlin book A Night Divided, so I knew going in that I was going to love Resistance. But I had no idea how blown away by it I was going to be. World War II is pretty well-trodden ground by this point, but Nielsen still managed to find an aspect–the Jewish resistance movement–that I didn't know anything about. I never knew that the Jews worked so hard to organize themselves and fight against the Nazis, but they did. They were incredibly brave, risking their lives every day to undermine the war effort, warn the people imprisoned in ghettos about the death camps, and smuggle some out into safe houses. Chava and her fellow fighters know from day one that they will most likely die for their cause, but they know that they will face death no matter what they do–they want to use their lives to do the most good before they are killed, either for fighting or for being Jewish. It's a horrible situation, the ultimate "rock and a hard place" dilemma, and they are beyond brave for choosing to do what they can to help. I love how Nielsen doesn't just leave it at that, though. Over the course of Chaya and Esther's journey, they meet lots of different people from all walks of life and religion. They meet some Poles who ignore them, others who attack them for being Jewish, and still others who risk life and limb to help them. They meet some Jews who refuse to fight back out of fear, and some who don't fight out of disbelief, but also some who won't fight because their faith forbids murder–so they fight for the Jewish religion by not taking up arms. Nielsen's focus on these moral nuances, on portraying the various ways people responded to the Nazis without judging them, is a great strength throughout the book. I realize I haven't really discussed the main characters much yet. It's hard to focus on them when there are so many incredible details about history to pull from Resistance's pages, but Chava is the perfect core to the book. She doesn't see herself as a hero, and she doesn't romanticize anything. She is a very pragmatic person, treating herself almost like an object and calculating how best to use herself for the good of the Jews and downfall of the Nazis. Her initial impatience with/distaste for Esther is completely reasonable, since the younger girl really is pretty useless, but I loved watching them come to understand and respect each other as the story went on. I rooted for both of them, as well as for their cause, though I knew the story couldn't possibly have a picture-perfect happy ending. I wouldn't recommend Resistance for very young readers, just because the vast majority of the characters in this book either die or expect themselves to die at any moment (and the climax, which is masterfully done by the way, is set in the Warsaw Ghetto during a doomed revolt). There's no bad language or graphic descriptions of the gruesome scenes Chava encounters, though, so as far as books about Polish Jews during WWII goes, this is about as "clean" as it's going to get. I'm sure it's no surprise when I say that I highly recommend Resistance. I try to always list pros and cons in my reviews, but I literally don't have any cons for this one. It's a wonderfully well-written book, and it gives proper due to the incredible men and women who fought for their people. I hope many children read Resistance and learn the story of these heroes. Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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