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Nine

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In an alternate world startlingly close to our own, humans have nine lives—and they can’t wait to burn straight through them. As you shed lives, you shed your awkward phases: one death is equal to one physical and mental upgrade. Julian’s friends are obsessed with the idea of burning lives, but Julian is determined to stay on his first for as long as he can. His mother, the In an alternate world startlingly close to our own, humans have nine lives—and they can’t wait to burn straight through them. As you shed lives, you shed your awkward phases: one death is equal to one physical and mental upgrade. Julian’s friends are obsessed with the idea of burning lives, but Julian is determined to stay on his first for as long as he can. His mother, the ultimate cautionary tale, burned through her first eight in just a few years, and Julian has no intention of succumbing to the debilitating rebirth sickness that she inflicted on herself. But the regime has death incentives aimed at controlling overpopulation, and Julian realizes that he’s going to have to burn at some point—especially when he becomes a target for Nicholas, the manipulative leader of the Burners, the school’s suicide club. And when Julian eventually succumbs, he uncovers suspicious gaps in the rebirth system that may explain exactly why his mother went so far down the rabbit hole years ago. Along with a group of student dissenters, Julian sets out to find answers and is soon on the verge of exposing the greatest conspiracy ever unleashed on the world. He has just eight more lives to uncover the brutal truth.


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In an alternate world startlingly close to our own, humans have nine lives—and they can’t wait to burn straight through them. As you shed lives, you shed your awkward phases: one death is equal to one physical and mental upgrade. Julian’s friends are obsessed with the idea of burning lives, but Julian is determined to stay on his first for as long as he can. His mother, the In an alternate world startlingly close to our own, humans have nine lives—and they can’t wait to burn straight through them. As you shed lives, you shed your awkward phases: one death is equal to one physical and mental upgrade. Julian’s friends are obsessed with the idea of burning lives, but Julian is determined to stay on his first for as long as he can. His mother, the ultimate cautionary tale, burned through her first eight in just a few years, and Julian has no intention of succumbing to the debilitating rebirth sickness that she inflicted on herself. But the regime has death incentives aimed at controlling overpopulation, and Julian realizes that he’s going to have to burn at some point—especially when he becomes a target for Nicholas, the manipulative leader of the Burners, the school’s suicide club. And when Julian eventually succumbs, he uncovers suspicious gaps in the rebirth system that may explain exactly why his mother went so far down the rabbit hole years ago. Along with a group of student dissenters, Julian sets out to find answers and is soon on the verge of exposing the greatest conspiracy ever unleashed on the world. He has just eight more lives to uncover the brutal truth.

30 review for Nine

  1. 4 out of 5

    MarytheBookLover

    My Opinion: I enjoyed this book tremendously. At first I thought this was so strange but, in a good way. The idea is that you have nine lives to burn in this alternate world. Usually, you die in a controlled environment like a clinic. But, there is a group of kids at the high school that call themselves the Burners that "die" via anyway they want i.e. by fire, drowning, shooting etc. They get a number tattooed on their necks with the number of the lives they are on. But, it changes after each lif My Opinion: I enjoyed this book tremendously. At first I thought this was so strange but, in a good way. The idea is that you have nine lives to burn in this alternate world. Usually, you die in a controlled environment like a clinic. But, there is a group of kids at the high school that call themselves the Burners that "die" via anyway they want i.e. by fire, drowning, shooting etc. They get a number tattooed on their necks with the number of the lives they are on. But, it changes after each life that you "burn". Our hero of the story, Julian, is on his first life and doesn't want to "burn". The problem with that is, you are required to do this, and it gives you special bonuses to "burn". Meanwhile, his mother burned her lives, and as she did so, she changed for the worse. She didn't recognize her family anymore and went a little crazy from "dying" so many times. Something was happening to her each time she burned a life before she passed away. Julian knows that something very bad happened and he wants that information so he hooks up with the leader of the "Burners" to get it. The "Burners" are an elitist group that in the beginning Julian doesn't want any part of. It's the popular kids and Julian is just not interested in that or is he? Well, our hero, Julian is scared that the same thing will happen to him, so he doesn't want to do it. He also, doesn't want to conform to what "society" thinks you should do - i.e. - he has a mind of his own. He thought his best friend was with him on this (Molly) but turns out, she conforms to society, so he really thinks he is all alone. But, he has to do it for his family. For those special incentives (peer pressure). Without giving the book away (which I probably said to much already). He has to go through his journey of what burning lives means and of what happened to his mother. That is a need that consumes him. It was well written and after I got over the horror of them having to "burn" their lives. You are supposed to have "burned" so many lives by a certain age. Well, I really got into this book. I was rooting for Julian the whole time because he didn't want to do it. He was scared and I don't blame him. I got that the book is all about peer pressure - pressure to do it from friends - burn a life. Peer-pressure in the form of going to college, peer pressure to get a job - his dad. I get it. It just took me a while to understand it. I get that it has suicide written all over this book "burning" but, it's a great book and I recommend it because it's not a normal book, in the sense that you have to think about the reading, and what the author is trying to get across. For me that is the best kind of book. It had action, thrills, and humor in it! I would say this is for New Adult more than teens tho. I would recommend for 16+. Overall, this was a well written and executed book! I give this book a 4.5 of 5 stars! Favorite quote: "Growing up, like burning, wasn't a choice. It was always there, waiting to happen to you."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Star Rating: Solid 3? I liked it, I didn’t love it. It was kinda just a big MEH for me. But, *shrugs*, to each their own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    Not Just Some YA Conspiracy Thing From the blurbs I figured this would start with an interesting premise and then turn into an "uncover the conspiracy" adventure, with maybe some action and probably a touch of romance. Well, yeah, that's actually all true, but boy did this author do a lot of fascinating stuff with the premise before then. The idea is that in this alt-world everyone has nine lives - that is to say they are reborn eight time before they have their final permadeath. After each death Not Just Some YA Conspiracy Thing From the blurbs I figured this would start with an interesting premise and then turn into an "uncover the conspiracy" adventure, with maybe some action and probably a touch of romance. Well, yeah, that's actually all true, but boy did this author do a lot of fascinating stuff with the premise before then. The idea is that in this alt-world everyone has nine lives - that is to say they are reborn eight time before they have their final permadeath. After each death they wake up in a Lake, swim to shore, and are met by a team of nurses and doctors who orient them and then put them on a bus back home. There are Lakes throughout the world, and this life-death-life-death process goes on globally. Because you can't really handle a population that recycles nine times, people are encouraged to "extinguish" themselves at regular intervals and so not take up space for too long. The benefit is that each rebirth comes with a physical and mental upgrade. Here's the cool detail. Each person is tattooed with the number of his current life. While murder or euthanasia is strictly forbidden there are powerful, very powerful, social forces compelling people to extinguish themselves on the approved schedule. If your life number falls behind your apparent age you start to feel the pressure. It's school pressure, economic pressure, job pressure, social pressure. (Our hero, Julian, won't play ball and resists dying. And thereby hangs the tale.) Now take this premise and run with it. First off, the whole book is a tremendous meditation on teen sex. Kids talking about never forgetting their first time, (dying), and popping their cherry, (first suicide), and losing their "One". This is knowing and hilarious satire, with an edgy undercurrent. Teens go to parties, get drunk, and decide to lose their "One". People lose their Two's on prom night. There are suicide clubs. This is deep and impressive parody and commentary. Next, there is tremendous satire regarding parental and societal pressure to "succeed". Parents lose income and benefits if their household number falls below a certain total, so there's always parental pressure on kids to move up levels. Get a job, or get into a good college, turns into "upgrade from a Three to a Four". Again, the subtext is riveting. (Julian deals constantly with his Dad's disappointment in Julian's status as a teenage One, even with Mom as a cautionary tale of the downside of leveling up.) Finally, you have the whole school culture angle. Who's popular, who's top dog, who dates the hottest girls - it all turns on your number and the swagger and style with which you move through lives. Do you go quietly to an extinguishment center and show up the next day with a new number, or do you electrocute yourself or blow yourself up at a school assembly? Well, do you want your death on YouTube? Most of the book fools around with these jazzy ideas. Mixed in is this question of why our hero's Mom burned through all her lives and died from rebirth sickness. That kicks into high gear in the book's last quarter, and that's when we move on to the conspiracy-action-quest, which is perfectly fine but just not, to me, the beating heart of the book. This is thinking YA, with many, many rewards to be teased out. Lots of suicides and some sex, (and especially and necessarily cavalier attitudes toward suicide), probably push this into an upper YA age group, but that seemed fine to me. This really was an exciting find. (Please note that I received a free advance ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Martin

    Julian is part of a society where everyone has nine lives. Each time you die, you upgrade in status and perks. However, Julian watched his mother keep upgrading her life count until she became permadead. Each new life cost in terms of senses and mental ability and even in knowing herself and her family. Julian wants no part of it. Julian's school has a Burners Club where students throw away their lives in spectacular fashion rather than just visiting an extinguishment clinic. Due to family pressu Julian is part of a society where everyone has nine lives. Each time you die, you upgrade in status and perks. However, Julian watched his mother keep upgrading her life count until she became permadead. Each new life cost in terms of senses and mental ability and even in knowing herself and her family. Julian wants no part of it. Julian's school has a Burners Club where students throw away their lives in spectacular fashion rather than just visiting an extinguishment clinic. Due to family pressure, since his family's life score isn't giving them enough money to pay the mortgage, Julian very reluctantly joins. But things are not quite as it seems. More and more people are being damaged instead of enhanced as they upgrade their life numbers. Julian finds himself in a group of young people who are tying to find answers to what is going on with the whole rebirth process. This was an interesting story but I still don't understand the world. The stated goal of the process is to control overpopulation but I can't see how bringing people back to life nine times accomplishes that. If you can get over that concept, the story was exciting. Julian was an interesting character who had a mystery to solve. He got answers but they weren't necessarily the ones he wanted. Other characters including Cody who is one of the discontented and thrown away kids and Nicholas who is the leader of the Burners and the son of the man in charge of the rebirth lake for their city were also interesting characters who each had their own agendas. Fans of science fiction could enjoy this one because of the concept and the adventure.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a unique topic for a book- the concept of every person having nine lives. It was like cats, but not. But also there were cats involved and I cannot help but wonder if that was purposeful? Anyway. Let us break this down into the stuff I liked versus the stuff I did not as much, because sure. What I Liked: The concept! It's really interesting- it's basically an alternate un You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a unique topic for a book- the concept of every person having nine lives. It was like cats, but not. But also there were cats involved and I cannot help but wonder if that was purposeful? Anyway. Let us break this down into the stuff I liked versus the stuff I did not as much, because sure. What I Liked: The concept! It's really interesting- it's basically an alternate universe I think, but where people have nine lives. But of course that creates... problems, because overpopulation and such, so there have to be advantages to burning off some of your lives. It's also quite thought-provoking. A lot of the situations that Julian finds himself in are tough- and it made me wonder what I would have done in his shoes. The answer isn't always as easy as we'd hope or think. There's also a lot of discussion about current topics. One of the main issues is how the poorer people are basically coerced into dying in order to stay afloat financially. There are a lot of other issues, but that's a pretty non-spoilery example of how poverty can snowball, and I thought it was insightful. It's full of action and a quick read. I was definitely entertained- and sometimes horrified. But never bored. What I Didn't: Really, I just wanted more information about the world. In a concept like this, I wanted so many more answers about how and why the world has become this way. I think I would have been better able to understand the motivation behind a lot of the choices that people made if the world made more sense to me. It's a standalone for now, though I can see it being expanded upon too, so who knows. Some of the political stuff got a little convoluted. I think this probably goes hand-in-hand with the above point, because these were the people whose motivations I didn't always understand. Or why some of the rules had evolved the way they had, and so forth. But when I didn't get answers I might have started to get a little apathetic about the political aspects. A few bits were kind of predictable. Not terribly so, but some of the bigger stuff at the end I was pretty easily able to guess. Bottom Line: A unique concept that is quite dark (yay if you enjoy darker reads like I do!), this book will certainly make you think- though you might also be thinking about how you'd like more world information, too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Nine has a very unique premise that I've never come across in a Y.A. novel - in an alternate world almost identical to ours, humans have nine lives. The entire society is structured around burning through lives - in order to get into college, you need to be on at least your 3rd life. To get government subsidies, your family's "life score" has to be high enough to qualify you for assistance. To get job promotions, you may need to burn a life...and so on. Those on their first life are either child Nine has a very unique premise that I've never come across in a Y.A. novel - in an alternate world almost identical to ours, humans have nine lives. The entire society is structured around burning through lives - in order to get into college, you need to be on at least your 3rd life. To get government subsidies, your family's "life score" has to be high enough to qualify you for assistance. To get job promotions, you may need to burn a life...and so on. Those on their first life are either children or immature teens. There are almost no adults who've not burned lives. You simply can't function in the society otherwise. Clinics exist so that citizens can burn a life in the way the government approves of. Julian's high school, however, has a suicide club and the members make a spectacle of burning through their lives in illegal but quietly sanctioned methods. This book isn't for the squeamish. Teens in this novel can be utterly stupid and extinguish their lives in creative ways to wake up reborn and ready to face a new day. There is a dark side to burning lives, though. "Wrinkles" can form - anything from something innocuous like a single skipped heart beat every minute to completely losing the ability to taste or see color. The more lives you burn, the more these wrinkles start appearing. There is something even darker...a rebirth sickness that is similar to dementia can afflict those who've burned through many lives. That's exactly what happened to Julian's mother and why he is still on his first life. The pressure begins to mount though, from Julian's peers in school, society's restrictions on those who haven't burned lives, and even his own father who needs their family to qualify for government assistance in order to not lose their home. There is a lot of tension surrounding Julian and just what he is going to do...and then the plot takes a turn and there is much more you find has been hidden under the surface. I won't give any of that away, but it was certainly a fun read. I enjoyed the dystopian elements of the novel as well as the unique elements of the world. I was also very happy that this book wraps itself up with an ending instead of dragging over a trilogy as so many Y.A. books do these days. Overall, Nine was an exciting and interesting read. Parent warnings: Violence: ★★★★★ - graphic suicides / death Cursing: ★★★ - some cursing, not overly frequent Sexual content: ★ - a couple of mild kisses LGBT content: a girl seems interested in another girl and kisses her during a party game

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate’s Book Spot

    As soon as I read the description of this book I wanted to know more, it had my imagination going crazy so I couldn’t resist jumping straight in! Zach Hines, you had me at the first line - don’t you just love an epic first line! So I was pulled into the storyline straight away and literally couldn’t stop reading, this is definitely one of those books that continuously has you saying “just one more page”. The concept of humans having nine lives was fascinating, the idea of burning those lives was As soon as I read the description of this book I wanted to know more, it had my imagination going crazy so I couldn’t resist jumping straight in! Zach Hines, you had me at the first line - don’t you just love an epic first line! So I was pulled into the storyline straight away and literally couldn’t stop reading, this is definitely one of those books that continuously has you saying “just one more page”. The concept of humans having nine lives was fascinating, the idea of burning those lives was intriguing if not slightly horrifying, basically every part of what was happening kept me glued to the pages. The author created an eerie, dark kind of atmosphere with his words and characters who were so easy to care about. One character in particular surprised me when I found myself warming to them in a big way, I certainly hadn’t seen that one coming! My heart pounded as I followed them through some seriously crazy events, searching for the truth was a dangerous mission that I wasn’t sure they could survive. This was an intense and exciting read that made my heart race. I feel like this will be one of 2018’s big hits!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maude VM

    5⭐ Damn that was good!!! Enfin un livre où la fin n’est pas prévisible après 50 pages 🙌🏼 Ce livre explore des concepts nouveaux which is so refreshing! Love the plot and the MC. Action packed and a bit of a mystery/intrigue 👌🏻 100% would recommend 😍 5⭐️ Damn that was good!!! Enfin un livre où la fin n’est pas prévisible après 50 pages 🙌🏼 Ce livre explore des concepts nouveaux which is so refreshing! Love the plot and the MC. Action packed and a bit of a mystery/intrigue 👌🏻 100% would recommend 😍

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shera (Book Whispers)

    Meh. Review to come, but I really didn't care for it. So much lost potential and world building. Honestly quiet boring.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    In a clever twist on dystopian storytelling, Zach Hines shows us a present day alternative world remarkably similar to our own in his debut novel NINE. Hundreds of years ago, in an Earth of a different dimension, a comet crashed into the planet, altering the atmosphere. When the fallout cleared, humans were irrevocably altered, having nine lives instead of just one. Fast forward to the present day and society has adapted to their nine lives. Needing to organize structure and optimize the populatio In a clever twist on dystopian storytelling, Zach Hines shows us a present day alternative world remarkably similar to our own in his debut novel NINE. Hundreds of years ago, in an Earth of a different dimension, a comet crashed into the planet, altering the atmosphere. When the fallout cleared, humans were irrevocably altered, having nine lives instead of just one. Fast forward to the present day and society has adapted to their nine lives. Needing to organize structure and optimize the population, each death you go through equals physical and mental upgrades. Not to mention societal benefits as well. Julian doesn’t want to burn through his lives. Having watched his mother deteriorate too quickly before reaching permadeath, he has no desire to go through the rebirth process --- or risk the rebirth sickness. But there’s a price to pay for staying a One. Ones cannot go to college, hold jobs or get married. You must be on an appropriate life number to move ahead. Finding himself the target of The Burners, the school’s suicide club, Julian realizes that society won’t allow him to remain a One. Finally relenting, Julian’s death begins to uncover holes in the system and offers him the chance to find out what really happened with his mother. They’ve been told death leads to better lives. But what if they’ve been lied to? NINE is an amazing ride! I love how Hines gives us a fresh twist on the dystopian world by giving us not a world set in the future, but one in an alternate dimension. Even though the world is by and large recognizable to our own, it is very different. Hines fluently weaves the nuanced differences into the storytelling in such a way that the reader is fully submersed into this new world with ease. One of my absolute favorite things about this novel is how creative the discussion of power and control is. Without giving anything away, I thought it was fascinating and very realistic how the wealthy would ensure that even extra lives would be manipulated to exert their control over the poor. The truth that Julian uncovers is a chilling and brilliant plot twist that still hasn’t left me. For avid readers of science fiction, there are a few plot holes that may pull the reader out of the story. This is a complicated world, and while Hines does an excellent job presenting the details to us, it does have a few gaps that may stand out. For me, the writing was solid and the story had me so enthralled, that while I questioned the holes as I came across them, they didn’t detract from the overall reading experience. I will caution that this is a story where death is glorified and glamorized. There are scenes describing suicide and other violent deaths that may be too much for sensitive readers. They are frequent, and they are intense. In all, this is an excellent debut novel that is unique and powerful. This world is incredibly realistic and filled with characters that are well developed. NINE will appeal to dystopian readers and fans of science fiction. I would highly recommend this book and cannot wait for more from Hines.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ainslee || Jest and Hearts

    This was so weird but so interesting. The book is full of strange death clubs, government secrets and conspiracies, weird super intelligent cats and cicadas(yes, you read that right!) and rebellion groups. Basically the story is set in an alternate universe where people have nine lives. When they die their "life score" increases and they get benefits like money and better jobs etc. The main character Julian doesn't want to die, hes on his first life which is unusual for someone his age. The more l This was so weird but so interesting. The book is full of strange death clubs, government secrets and conspiracies, weird super intelligent cats and cicadas(yes, you read that right!) and rebellion groups. Basically the story is set in an alternate universe where people have nine lives. When they die their "life score" increases and they get benefits like money and better jobs etc. The main character Julian doesn't want to die, hes on his first life which is unusual for someone his age. The more lives you burn through the more abnormalities (loss of colour, loss of taste, memory loss etc.) appear when they are reborn. Not only do more abnormalities appear but retrogression happens, this is when someone is reborn and cant remember anything about themselves, not even their name. After Julian burns he learns some pretty shocking truths about what actually happens when you die and some pretty shocking truths about the government. This book starts off with a bang, literally! At Julian's school there is a prestigious death club called The Burners which everyone (except Julian) wants to be a part of. This group plans deaths and group deaths which they stream and upload online so everyone can see. But morbid, huh? The book starts off with Julian and his best friend Molly at a Burners party the night before school starts, and like I said this party goes off with a bang! This is basically the whole book where the deaths are done for a shock factor, some of them will make you think WTF. The author is incredibly creative. Julian is a great MC he doesn't want to fit the norm and doesn't want to die. He doesn't see the point and has seen first hand what burning can do to your mind. You'll be rooting for him to find the truth and to stand for what he believes in. He makes some unlikely friends who are willing to help him because they share the same goals. He also gets himself into some pretty sticky situations. The one thing that kind of threw me off about Julian was how he spoke sometimes, he seemed very formal which doesn't fit his personality or upbringing Also, this author must love cats, and i'm here for that. Cats are mentioned throughout the book and play a role in the story. There are different types of cats, Lake cats and regular cats and the lake cats are incredibly intelligent. Praise all of the cats! Overall this book was great. It was weird, interesting and creative! But the book leaves off as though there could be anothe, the story could continue and it leaves a few questions too. If there is another book I will be reading it. If you are squeamish about death or don't want to read about suicide I wouldn't recommend you read this. Because that's basically what happens, people kill themselves to increase their life score, which is the premise of the book. Thank you to HarperCollins for providing me with a copy for review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adri266

    Po tom, ako kometa narazila do zeme, ludstvo sa zmenilo. Zrazu boli schopni zomriet 9x a vzdy sa cez Jazero zrodit znovu v tom istom veku, ale s dokonalym telom. Avsak, kazde take zomretie ma nejaku tu vrasku /niekto strati schopnost vidiet farby, niekto strati chut, atd/ a postupne sa cele telo aj mysel degeneruje. Vlady vsak podporuju pravidelne a nariadene zomieranie, kedze nastalo k preludneniu. Napr ak chcete ist na VS, musite byt cislo 3. Ak chcete udrzat vas dom, vasa rodina musi mat urcite Po tom, ako kometa narazila do zeme, ludstvo sa zmenilo. Zrazu boli schopni zomriet 9x a vzdy sa cez Jazero zrodit znovu v tom istom veku, ale s dokonalym telom. Avsak, kazde take zomretie ma nejaku tu vrasku /niekto strati schopnost vidiet farby, niekto strati chut, atd/ a postupne sa cele telo aj mysel degeneruje. Vlady vsak podporuju pravidelne a nariadene zomieranie, kedze nastalo k preludneniu. Napr ak chcete ist na VS, musite byt cislo 3. Ak chcete udrzat vas dom, vasa rodina musi mat urcite cislo. Ale napriek tomu, ze to umieranie by malo prebiehat v nemocnici pod dozorom, su rozne gangy a kluby, ktore si z toho robia srandu a robia akoby masove samovrazdy. Hlavna postava, Julian, hoci je na SS, je stale 1. Boji sa zomierania, kedze jeho mama za par rokov vyuzila vsetky svoje zivoty a ku koncu uz bola riadne sialena. Skola, otec aj spolocnost vsak nanho tlacia. A ked sa konecne rozhodne, ze to pre svoju rodinu spravi, zacne zistovat, ze to cele je uplne o niecom inom. Ze ten, kto vedie najznamejsi klub tych samovrahov, hoci ma vytetovanu 5, je 1. Tak o co tu vlastne ide? Kam zmizla jeho naj kamoska? Preco vlastne zomrela jeho mama? A preco do kelu ho prenasleduje ta ista macka??? Nebolo to zle, ale v polke som sa zacala poriadne nudit. Cakala som viac info o tom svete, ako to tam funguje. Skoda. Takze za mna 3*.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lex

    ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was weirdly great. Lol. It is definitely a new concept for me. It delivered, imo. The world building is great, the writing good. The story line, yep. It just a bit descriptive in some parts but some parts are NOT that descriptive if you get my drift. I still have questions. Like, where did the bodies comes from? Like did they get it manufactured or something? I'm morbidly curious about the science of it. Lol. They jus ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. It was weirdly great. Lol. It is definitely a new concept for me. It delivered, imo. The world building is great, the writing good. The story line, yep. It just a bit descriptive in some parts but some parts are NOT that descriptive if you get my drift. I still have questions. Like, where did the bodies comes from? Like did they get it manufactured or something? I'm morbidly curious about the science of it. Lol. They just said they emerged from the Lake. So, are the new bodies kept there?? How does that work?? I need that kind of answers, dammit. Lmao. Question regarding the story were answered. But of course some new ones came up too. I can say that this book is really good albeit a bit weird. Worth my time to read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    DNF because I couldn't get into this one

  15. 4 out of 5

    Larosenoire299

    3.5/5 The premise of Nine is better than the execution. I don't like how people have 9 lives turns out to be an experiment. An open ending is not what I want. I don't like how the denouement leave too many unanswered questions. I have a feeling that this book could have had more room to develop. It starts off promising and ends up falling flat, which let me down a bit.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tashy

    **I received an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion** "We embrace death, and we make a mockery of it. Death. She is our bitch." Wise words huh? I started reading this YA novel right after I finished the Black Dagger Brotherhood series just to get something fresh in my head. I hope my review isn't too biased. Because in all honesty, I can only give this book 3 stars. It had a lot of potential when it first started but I feel like it could've been better. With that, I'll get to the rev **I received an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion** "We embrace death, and we make a mockery of it. Death. She is our bitch." Wise words huh? I started reading this YA novel right after I finished the Black Dagger Brotherhood series just to get something fresh in my head. I hope my review isn't too biased. Because in all honesty, I can only give this book 3 stars. It had a lot of potential when it first started but I feel like it could've been better. With that, I'll get to the review in more detail. Our main character is named Julian Dex. He is about 17 years old and a senior at a private school in the town of Lakeshore. He has one friend and her name is Molly. Now Molly is one of those girls that will do anything to fit in. Including "burning". Burning , in this book, means to extinguish your life. Suicide, kill yourself. You get it. Except you don't really die. In this strange parallel universe, humans have nine lives. The very first chapter was mind-boggling to say the least. You get a first row seat to teens killing themselves in droves. A little macabre I know, but hey I didn't write it. Once these kids die, they are "reborn" into the Lake. Where apparently nurses in powder blue robes meet you with towels outside of some large white facility. Where they give you a new number tattoo and chip FREE OF CHARGE! But hey at least you get to come back with a much better version of your own body. Molly and Julian are the "poor kids". The kids who's families don't have a high "LifeScore". The kids who are at the private school on scholarship. And for some reason, everyone knows it. Everyone also knows that Julian's mother died from retrogression. I'll let you read the book and figure out what that is. Since it's part of the fun. Anyway, Julian doesn't fall into line the way everyone else does. He's different. He's a One. Which means he's never "Burned" a life. Apparently, in this weird universe, you get better jobs and more money when you have a higher number of burns. But the more you burn the more issues you start to have. Such as loss of taste, loss of sight and worse, loss of memory. So you're screwed if you do and screwed if you don't basically. I couldn't help but feel bad for the people in this book. Especially the kids. Kids today have so much pressure on them that they have the same level of stress as mental patients did in the 1950's. That's saying a lot. Kids have enough on their plates growing up as it is. And in this book life is just harder. The peer pressure to burn through your lives, the pressure from your parents and the government to do the same. Having to burn 2 lives in order just to graduate high school just shows how corrupt and insane this worlds government really is. Over all, I will give this book 3 stars. It started off promising. Something I've never had the pleasure of reading. The only character that I could feel anything for was Julian. Molly was an annoying basic girl looking to fit into her basic surroundings. The adults were horrible human beings including Julian's father who asked him to burn lives for the sake of their mortgage. I mean come on! The pacing was going good at the beginning. Then it slowed down to where I was almost bored and then picked up right at the end. Obviously, I'm not going to spoil it for you, but as usual, the goverment has some sort of conspiracy going on. And clearly they are trying to hide something. It was a fun quick read for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hannah L (Reviewer)

    A stand alone, Nine asks the question: would we value life if we had nine of them? The answer, heck no. Julian is a One. He hasn't died even once yet, but that comes with the problem of not getting any of the physical advancements that comes with dying. For each death, you get tax breaks and stronger, faster, smarter, prettier and more talented. Julian is quite unusual and he is in a lot of danger when the life burners get their sights locked on him. The burners want to burn through their nine A stand alone, Nine asks the question: would we value life if we had nine of them? The answer, heck no. Julian is a One. He hasn't died even once yet, but that comes with the problem of not getting any of the physical advancements that comes with dying. For each death, you get tax breaks and stronger, faster, smarter, prettier and more talented. Julian is quite unusual and he is in a lot of danger when the life burners get their sights locked on him. The burners want to burn through their nine lives with blood, violence and glory; and now they want to indicate Julian. They believe that getting to Julian to burn will let them go down in infamy. To top it off, there is a conspiracy that is about to suck the unwitting Julian right into it. Nine was a mind bending novel. It addressed a very profound question in suck a strange and specific way. When lives are multiplied, will we still value them? Or will they be commodified? It was a mind game that had me thinking deeply on many aspects of life and death. It really makes the reader think. I found that Julian was an interesting character, since he rebelled so strongly to his culture and world. It was fascinating to follow his perspective on the whole thing, as someone who was raised in this world. All in all, I liked Nine, and I give it the rating of FOUR OUT OF FIVE STARS!!! Want more of me? Go to: http://thenotsopubliclibrary.blogspot.ca

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dominic O.

    After reading this book, I would recommend it to others who enjoy an unusual and a slightly dark science fiction book. I believe that this book was engaging and interesting, and it kept me hooked. This book is about a world where everyone has nine lives, but the government and society forces people to waste these lives in order to control the population. In return, these people get rewards for each live they waste as well as coming back in a more improved body. The main character, Julian, is a t After reading this book, I would recommend it to others who enjoy an unusual and a slightly dark science fiction book. I believe that this book was engaging and interesting, and it kept me hooked. This book is about a world where everyone has nine lives, but the government and society forces people to waste these lives in order to control the population. In return, these people get rewards for each live they waste as well as coming back in a more improved body. The main character, Julian, is a teenager is still on his first life. Everyday, he deals with society, his friends, and even his father pushing him to waste more lives. Later, he joins the burners club, which is a club that defies the rules of society and challenges the authorities through "burning" their lives in a different way rather than dying through a nurse or doctor. These "burners" like to have parties that have people committing suicide in gruesome and, some would say, "creative" ways. Later on, Julian joins these burners in order to find out about his mom, who wasted her lives to quickly and is considered to what is called "permadead, and uncover the secrets of society. Julian destroys his streak of being a one for so long in order to find out the truth about his mother. He does this by joining the "burners" club to get answers from their leader. This keeps the story engaging and also keeps me hooked because it makes me want to find out more about the truth behind Julian's mother and the secrets that society hides. The "burner" parties and club along with Julian meeting new friends, like his friend Cody, who helps him uncover the truth about wasting lives makes the story interesting because of the gruesomeness, darkness, and mystery of the book. Overall, I like this book because it easily got me hooked from the beginning. I would recommend this book to others who like this genre or tone.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kacey

    This is definitely one of the better dystopian/alternate timeline books I've read in a while. It's thought-provoking, it is good social commentary, it put me as a reader on-edge, it was uncomfortable, it had a great climax and it focused on many different types of characters. I can't tell you how nice it is to not be TOLD everything, but to be shown and then allowed to drawn my own conclusions. Would I have minded more information? Absolutely not. Even something like why the author chose cicadas This is definitely one of the better dystopian/alternate timeline books I've read in a while. It's thought-provoking, it is good social commentary, it put me as a reader on-edge, it was uncomfortable, it had a great climax and it focused on many different types of characters. I can't tell you how nice it is to not be TOLD everything, but to be shown and then allowed to drawn my own conclusions. Would I have minded more information? Absolutely not. Even something like why the author chose cicadas as one of the other beings capable of reviving multiple times. I also wouldn't mind a prequel showing the first revivals. How did people react? Who came up with the Lakes system? Where do the new bodies come from? What kind of justice system is in place for those who murder? Not everything is fully explained. I personally like it, since it allows readers to have their own interpretations and find their own meaning in things. But it may turn off people who like getting answers to their questions. But as I said, it's very thought-provoking and offers some good social commentary. The divide between the poor and the wealthy is one of the more obvious, but there's also good stuff about peer pressure and wanting to fit in/seem "cool". There's stuff for the internet age, like doing crazy stunts just to get attention. There's stuff on society in general, like accepting the status quo and how things are versus questioning it and fighting to be your own person. I don't want to mention all of them since some of it is spoiler territory, but hopefully it will spark conversation and get people to see reflections of these things in our world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa Mead

    first line: “Julian had no idea what it meant to die.” plot: Hundreds of years ago, a fierce storm blew across the world, altering the DNA of the humans who lived on the surface. It wasn’t long before they realized that they now had nine lives -- every death leading up to their ninth, they would be reborn with better characteristics, such as a larger intelligence, better metabolism, etc. Now in the modern era, governments have attempted to curb overpopulation by offering benefits to individuals t first line: “Julian had no idea what it meant to die.” plot: Hundreds of years ago, a fierce storm blew across the world, altering the DNA of the humans who lived on the surface. It wasn’t long before they realized that they now had nine lives -- every death leading up to their ninth, they would be reborn with better characteristics, such as a larger intelligence, better metabolism, etc. Now in the modern era, governments have attempted to curb overpopulation by offering benefits to individuals that go to clinics and burn off their lives. Julian doesn’t have the philosophy that many of his fellow peers have. He’s a One, which means he’s never gone through the rebirth process, and he doesn’t want to. But between the pressure of the school’s Burners (a teenage group that encourages reckless, extravagant, self-inflicting deaths) and new information about his mother (who perma-deathed a while ago, under mysterious circumstances), Julian doesn’t know what to do. All he knows is that his determination won’t let anyone prevent him from uncovering the truth about how his mom died and the “rebirth sickness” plaguing his town. memorable impression(s): What a COOL concept! While some novels that explore new worlds have info-dumps of details, I feel like this book didn’t have enough! I loved the mystery, the main character, and the twist-and-turns of this book so much, I wish it wasn’t just a stand alone. Although it got a little slow (for me) towards the middle-end of the novel, the shock factor and unique setting made up for it. I didn't like... the things that weren’t explained in this novel. There were a lot of questions. Do not read if you have not finished the book, unless you just want to be spoiled. * Besides the government, what could stop you from taking the water from the ponds and creating your own resurrection pool? * Do the pools have to have a certain volume? If you drained enough of the water, would it stop being a resurrection pool? At what point does it stop resurrecting people? * Are you resurrected in the nearest pond, or do you have to fill out a form to be transported there once you die? If the first case is correct, how can your [dead] body tell which body of water is closest to you? What if two ponds are equally distant? * What happens if you experience a near-death experience and are “dead” for a period of time -- then you wake up. Would there be two of you? * How do the ponds know what number you are, when they never receive your body? You just appear, one life older, in the middle of the pond. * Why bodies of water? Why couldn’t you wake up on top of a mountain, or inside a tree, or something? * If all (or most) ponds are for resurrection, what about the oceans? Can anyone wake up in the middle of the Pacific after dying? Because of the cycle of water, condensation, precipitation, etc. are the residents of these communities inhaling this pond water? If so, is that why they have the ability to resurrect in the pool? Is this how the pool and the individual are linked? * Why nine lives? * How are the bodies generated? One second, it’s an empty pool, the next second, there is a whole new body swimming towards the surface. It’s shown that the old body need not be present in a resurrection (it can be burned into complete ashes, and the person still emerges from the pool). So how can a whole person’s anatomy just be duplicated from water? * What if the pools were poisoned? What’s to stop a terrorist from flying over the pool, dropping a [large] amount of a chemical over the area, and waiting to see people resurrect until their permadeath? * What if a person died (again) in the time between their death and their rise to the surface of the pool? * There is mention of a secluded society where rebirths don’t happen/there are no ponds. Does that mean that the ponds have to be within a certain distance of the death? Do those people still get their nine lives? If they die (not permadeath), do they just wake up in their body? * How did they even realize they had this ability? Like some old 19th century guy dies and wakes up ten minutes in a pond? I feel like religion would really play a part in the understanding of this phenomenon, which seemed to have little to no mention in this book. … Alright, so maybe I was more confused than I thought. I still can’t believe this wasn’t the first book of a series, because there was a lot of potential. Also, leaning on that, I wish it would have explained more about the other countries. I can’t remember which ones struggled with overpopulation issues due to lack of regulation with lives, but to read about a character’s perspective who lived in one of those countries? That would be really cool. Hopefully a sequel?? :) past and future: This was Nick Hines’ first novel, so I haven’t read anything else from him. However, if he wrote another book in this universe or on another topic, I’d most likely buy it. He comes up with some interesting ideas, so most likely his future novels would be interesting as well. last thoughts: Unique and thought-provoking world, but the world building wasn’t explained well enough. I still really enjoyed it and would recommend to fans of The Hunger Games, #Murdertrending, or Scythe.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    3.5-3.75 Have you ever heard that cat's have nine lives? Well what would you do if you lived in a world in which people have nine lives? This is the dilemma Julien faces everyday because he hasn't used up any of his lives, he is still a One, despite the government mandates to extinguish lives at certain milestones for population control. Unfortunately for Julien, staying a One may no longer be an option. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, it was definitely a different story than any I have re 3.5-3.75 Have you ever heard that cat's have nine lives? Well what would you do if you lived in a world in which people have nine lives? This is the dilemma Julien faces everyday because he hasn't used up any of his lives, he is still a One, despite the government mandates to extinguish lives at certain milestones for population control. Unfortunately for Julien, staying a One may no longer be an option. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, it was definitely a different story than any I have read previously and it had me flying through the pages to see how everything would turn out. This book is filled with lies, deceit and corruption and there is no telling who you should trust and who is telling you the truth. There is a wide range of characters in this book and you jump from their different perspectives of the events going on in Lakeshore to get a grasp of the entire situation. Julien the main character was well thought out and you could see his motivations throughout the book. All of the characters had their own reasonings for doing things and in a society like this it is hard to tell who is right and who is wrong. Definitely a quick and interesting read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anita Eti

    This book had a really interesting concept, I really enjoyed the premise and the book did not disappoint. Read if you’re in the mood for some YA science fiction that is different from literally everything out there. The world is based on the fact that humans get nine lives and after every death they wake up in this lake usually better looking or thinner, etc (sometimes they come out with defects though , like an inability to see certain colors or taste and smell things). There’s usually a set tim This book had a really interesting concept, I really enjoyed the premise and the book did not disappoint. Read if you’re in the mood for some YA science fiction that is different from literally everything out there. The world is based on the fact that humans get nine lives and after every death they wake up in this lake usually better looking or thinner, etc (sometimes they come out with defects though , like an inability to see certain colors or taste and smell things). There’s usually a set time for an individual to “burn” (burn a life) but Julian at the beginning is still a one as a high school senior when he should be a two or a three. Along with the pressure to burn from his family, there also this group at school that burns for fun, who want him to burn to increase their quota. Coupled with his best friend’s mysterious disappearance, his mom’s inexplicable death, a strange girl and an even stranger seemingly immortal cat, Julian gets embroiled in a fight for survival. But who, or what, exactly is he saving?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tayo

    How disappointing. Once upon a time dystopia used to be my absolute favourite genre, and that changed largely due to books like this. Just very underwhelming, even moreso when considering the intriguing premise. This book just never took off for me. There was barely any world building. And if contemporary romance lives or dies by the ship, then dystopia lives or dies by the world building. I could not tell you if this world in Nine was always this way or how it came to be. Even more damning is I How disappointing. Once upon a time dystopia used to be my absolute favourite genre, and that changed largely due to books like this. Just very underwhelming, even moreso when considering the intriguing premise. This book just never took off for me. There was barely any world building. And if contemporary romance lives or dies by the ship, then dystopia lives or dies by the world building. I could not tell you if this world in Nine was always this way or how it came to be. Even more damning is I couldn't tell you how this world even functions. Which is utterly bizarre in a dystopia, and one that directly is trying to deal with how to overcome how their world is run. I could write on and on about how this plot didn't work but I don't really care. I'm more a character reader than plot driven, and my favourite books are usually a marriage of the two. This is to say I'm usually more forgiving if I'm drawn to the characters and on board (whether they're supposed to be likeable or not). Nine did not have that going for it. At all. The main character was bland as anything. And the supporting characters also felt a little like place holders. I initially gave this 3 stars because it was actually quite easy to read and the writing was easy to sink into. However on further reflection I don't think I cared for it even that much. Maybe 2.5 stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christina (Ensconced in Lit)

    I really enjoyed Nine by Zach Hines in the midst of reading many many fantasies. This is more of a dystopian world where everyone has nine lives and the higher your life number, the more high your standing in society is. Each time you die you get regenerated/reborn in a Lake. But something sinister is going on with how these Lakes are managed. The book follows Julian (and a couple other characters) in third person, and he is the only "One" in his school. Kids have burner parties where they kill I really enjoyed Nine by Zach Hines in the midst of reading many many fantasies. This is more of a dystopian world where everyone has nine lives and the higher your life number, the more high your standing in society is. Each time you die you get regenerated/reborn in a Lake. But something sinister is going on with how these Lakes are managed. The book follows Julian (and a couple other characters) in third person, and he is the only "One" in his school. Kids have burner parties where they kill each other in very gruesome manners and try to top each other on how gross it is. It's an interesting world setup and I was flipping the pages to get to the end and enjoyed most of the twists. So my biggest beef was what in the heck is up with this world? Why do people have 9 lives when overpopulation is a problem? What are these Lakes? I can't tell if this is the first in a series because maybe the next book will give us a little more clarity? It did bother me that I couldn't really make sense of what I was reading world building wise. But otherwise, a fast fun read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Overall, Nine was a quick and thrilling read. I'd give it a 2.5. While I sympathized with some of the characters, I wasn't particularly invested in their plight. I felt bad for Julian, being made to burn his lives to help his family, but personality-wise he made for a pretty dull leading character. Meanwhile, Nicholas, the sort-of-but-not-really antagonist made me cringe with his dialogue. He took himself far too seriously and came off as more theatrical than menacing. The cast of characters leav Overall, Nine was a quick and thrilling read. I'd give it a 2.5. While I sympathized with some of the characters, I wasn't particularly invested in their plight. I felt bad for Julian, being made to burn his lives to help his family, but personality-wise he made for a pretty dull leading character. Meanwhile, Nicholas, the sort-of-but-not-really antagonist made me cringe with his dialogue. He took himself far too seriously and came off as more theatrical than menacing. The cast of characters leaves a lot to be desired. In addition, the structure of the story is similar to other YA books where a group of teens try to uncover a government-level conspiracy (along the lines of Little Brother by Cory Doctorow). As far Nine being thought-provoking...if you want a story that explores mortality, I'd recommend Scythe instead. The Burners reminded me of the splatting habit in Scythe a little too much.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This was an atypical dystopian venture that surprised me by how dark it is considering it's a YA title. The main character is a little linear throughout and predictable, but I found the setting to be interesting. A dark tone prevails the entire book as suicide and murder are promoted under the guise of encouraging people to socially advance by shedding their multiple lives. Due to some unexplored and unexplained phenomena two hundred years prior people began manifesting the capacity for multiple This was an atypical dystopian venture that surprised me by how dark it is considering it's a YA title. The main character is a little linear throughout and predictable, but I found the setting to be interesting. A dark tone prevails the entire book as suicide and murder are promoted under the guise of encouraging people to socially advance by shedding their multiple lives. Due to some unexplored and unexplained phenomena two hundred years prior people began manifesting the capacity for multiple lives. Rebirth in 'Lakes' that seem supernatural and not scientific leads humanity down a dark spiral and governments to control people by mandatorily scheduling them to advance their life scores from 1-9 systemically helping to lower the surplus population. I give it 3.5 stars mostly for creative world building, I would have liked to have seen more about the process of rebirth rather than how terrible governments can be.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ema

    What a strange and unusual book! I do appreciate the ending. It almost fell into my perpetual complaint of the trap of dystopias, that it tried to solve the dystopia, but the ending was quite realistic and in line with all of the characters' desires and goals, and I very much respected that. This also made sense as a dystopia--there was a touch of magical realism that meant I could buy that part and suspend my disbelief--but I wish it had explained more early on. I did love the economics of it all What a strange and unusual book! I do appreciate the ending. It almost fell into my perpetual complaint of the trap of dystopias, that it tried to solve the dystopia, but the ending was quite realistic and in line with all of the characters' desires and goals, and I very much respected that. This also made sense as a dystopia--there was a touch of magical realism that meant I could buy that part and suspend my disbelief--but I wish it had explained more early on. I did love the economics of it all, and the motivating factors behind getting people on later lives, but I wished it was better explained earlier on instead of taken entirely for granted. I also think there was missed opportunities for religion and philosophy, but there was already enough going on.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Kind of an interesting premise, Nine imagines a world where everyone gets nine lives, and when one "dies," they are instantly reborn in a lake. There's an interesting mystery involved when the main character goes on a quest to discover what the government is hiding about this situation which involved his mom who was "permadead" and was involved in said conspiracy. The book was okay, but I think I had a hard time with the overall premise-- it just seemed weird, which I'm definitely okay with, but Kind of an interesting premise, Nine imagines a world where everyone gets nine lives, and when one "dies," they are instantly reborn in a lake. There's an interesting mystery involved when the main character goes on a quest to discover what the government is hiding about this situation which involved his mom who was "permadead" and was involved in said conspiracy. The book was okay, but I think I had a hard time with the overall premise-- it just seemed weird, which I'm definitely okay with, but kind of pointlessly weird and I wanted more world building for it all to make some kind of sense or have a built in logic to it. But teenagers who really don't care about that kind of thing, will probably really enjoy this since there's a mystery to keep them on their toes.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aoife

    An eerie, unique novel. The central idea - that humans have been granted nine lives instead of just one - is fascinating and something I've never come across before. However, the writing was confusing. Information was dropped in at random points, I was never quite sure of the rules, and after finishing I was still confused about certain plot points. Maybe this is part of a sequel and they'll be addressed later, I don't know. If there is a sequel, I'll probably read it. But I won't be rushing out d An eerie, unique novel. The central idea - that humans have been granted nine lives instead of just one - is fascinating and something I've never come across before. However, the writing was confusing. Information was dropped in at random points, I was never quite sure of the rules, and after finishing I was still confused about certain plot points. Maybe this is part of a sequel and they'll be addressed later, I don't know. If there is a sequel, I'll probably read it. But I won't be rushing out desperate to know what happens, and that's a shame. An idea as original as this deserves better. Receiving an ARC did not affect my review in any way.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Brilliant concept, poor execution. Every human gets nine lives? Sweet. Evil corporation/governing the process of rebirth? Terrifying. Crazy suicide school club? Whoa. So how did this end up being so meh?It starts out very strong and then practically drizzles to the finish. There are too many side characters that I guess you are supposed to care about, but you don't get to know them at all. No empathy was built, at least for me, whatsoever. Also, at least one character "sneaked" somewhere each chap Brilliant concept, poor execution. Every human gets nine lives? Sweet. Evil corporation/governing the process of rebirth? Terrifying. Crazy suicide school club? Whoa. So how did this end up being so meh?It starts out very strong and then practically drizzles to the finish. There are too many side characters that I guess you are supposed to care about, but you don't get to know them at all. No empathy was built, at least for me, whatsoever. Also, at least one character "sneaked" somewhere each chapter. I don't think I've ever read that word so much in one book.

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