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Fan Art

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When the picture tells the story… Senior year is almost over, and Jamie Peterson has a big problem. Not college—that’s all set. Not prom—he’ll find a date somehow. No, it’s the worst problem of all: he’s fallen for his best friend. As much as Jamie tries to keep it under wraps, everyone seems to know where his affections lie, and the giggling girls in art class are determine When the picture tells the story… Senior year is almost over, and Jamie Peterson has a big problem. Not college—that’s all set. Not prom—he’ll find a date somehow. No, it’s the worst problem of all: he’s fallen for his best friend. As much as Jamie tries to keep it under wraps, everyone seems to know where his affections lie, and the giggling girls in art class are determined to help Jamie get together with Mason. But Jamie isn’t sure if that’s what he wants—because as much as Jamie would like to come clean to Mason, what if the truth ruins everything? What if there are no more road trips, taco dinners, or movie nights? Does he dare risk a childhood friendship for romance? This book is about what happens when a picture reveals what we can’t say, when art is truer than life, and how falling in love is easy, except when it’s not. Fan Art explores the joys and pains of friendship, of pressing boundaries, and how facing our worst fears can sometimes lead us to what we want most.


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When the picture tells the story… Senior year is almost over, and Jamie Peterson has a big problem. Not college—that’s all set. Not prom—he’ll find a date somehow. No, it’s the worst problem of all: he’s fallen for his best friend. As much as Jamie tries to keep it under wraps, everyone seems to know where his affections lie, and the giggling girls in art class are determine When the picture tells the story… Senior year is almost over, and Jamie Peterson has a big problem. Not college—that’s all set. Not prom—he’ll find a date somehow. No, it’s the worst problem of all: he’s fallen for his best friend. As much as Jamie tries to keep it under wraps, everyone seems to know where his affections lie, and the giggling girls in art class are determined to help Jamie get together with Mason. But Jamie isn’t sure if that’s what he wants—because as much as Jamie would like to come clean to Mason, what if the truth ruins everything? What if there are no more road trips, taco dinners, or movie nights? Does he dare risk a childhood friendship for romance? This book is about what happens when a picture reveals what we can’t say, when art is truer than life, and how falling in love is easy, except when it’s not. Fan Art explores the joys and pains of friendship, of pressing boundaries, and how facing our worst fears can sometimes lead us to what we want most.

30 review for Fan Art

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    it's really amazing that it's been almost two years since I read this and I still hate it so much So here's the thing: the attitude of this book was incredibly fetishistic. Some of the comments about gay guys genuinely freaked me out. I've never read an lgbt romance that made me feel so sure the author was straight. Is this how the author thinks lesbians act around gay guys? Is this really how Sarah Tregay thinks? So there are two lesbian characters in this book. [No bi characters. What's a bis it's really amazing that it's been almost two years since I read this and I still hate it so much So here's the thing: the attitude of this book was incredibly fetishistic. Some of the comments about gay guys genuinely freaked me out. I've never read an lgbt romance that made me feel so sure the author was straight. Is this how the author thinks lesbians act around gay guys? Is this really how Sarah Tregay thinks? So there are two lesbian characters in this book. [No bi characters. What's a bisexual?] Both of them are obsessed with gay guys, and outright states that “everyone loves gay guys”. Never do they talk about gay girls, because they can't be too gay when they're props for the straight author!! Okay, Ms. Tregay. As a lesbian, I can tell you for certain that lesbians are no more obsessed with gay guys than anyone else. Also, being obsessed with gay guys and treating them like a fetish is... not good. They're real people! They're not props for jacking off! And okay, here's the worst part: you do not draw stuff about guys you know getting it on with each other and put it in the school paper . That's creepy and completely out of line. You can't frame this any other way; drawing comics about people you barely know dating is weird. Being outed to your entire school isn't fucking cute. It's really fucking not. Especially when you live in the goddamn Bible Belt. This could be legitimately dangerous for Jamie and Mason, and you want to have a laugh about it? That's terrible. Aside from all the legitimate issues with homophobia, Fan Art was just... bad. The characters are badly drawn and developed. the writing style wasn't great, and everything was so sickeningly sweet I wanted to vomit . And not in a good way. This is like if someone handed you a perfectly decent cupcake and proceeded to pour two pints of sugar syrup over it as you watched. That metaphor, by the way, wasn't nearly as terribly written as this book was. There were parts to Fan Art that weren't that bad. Jamie, the main character, is kind of a dick, but he had a decent friendship with one of the aforementioned terrible lesbians! Like, there were terrible parts to that friendship, obviously. But they had a scene where they danced and hugged and it was kind of cute! This entire book should've been about their friendship without the creepy-ass art concept, but noooooooo. In all honesty, this just read like the really terrible kind of fanfiction. I do not want to see weirdly fetishistic stuff in the gay section!! I go there to escape homophobia!! Not find more!! Please, Sarah Tregay, never write about LGBT characters again. Or at least do some fucking research beyond running a porno blog. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube

  2. 5 out of 5

    Blythe

    I hated this book a lot, and so did my co-bloggers Ellis and Mel. Here's why: Ellis: This book was just terribad. Blythe: I think it might be the worst book I've read this year. Ellis: Definitely one of the most infuriating. Mel: I didn't hate it as much as you guys did, but definitely terrible in general. Definitely the worst LGBTQ+ I’ve read. Blythe: Absolutely the worst LGBT I’ve read. I can't imagine there being any other LGBT novel out there worse than this, honestly. Ellis: Maybe one with a bun I hated this book a lot, and so did my co-bloggers Ellis and Mel. Here's why: Ellis: This book was just terribad. Blythe: I think it might be the worst book I've read this year. Ellis: Definitely one of the most infuriating. Mel: I didn't hate it as much as you guys did, but definitely terrible in general. Definitely the worst LGBTQ+ I’ve read. Blythe: Absolutely the worst LGBT I’ve read. I can't imagine there being any other LGBT novel out there worse than this, honestly. Ellis: Maybe one with a bunch of Jamies. Blythe: Like a Jamie orgy where everyone just judges each other and leaves by the end of the novel. Just … Jamie, you guys. Jamie. Mel: There's the letting out a breath I didn't realise I was holding in here, too. Ellis: YES. First chapter. That’s when I should have known this wouldn't turn out well. Blythe: Let's just get this all out of the way: I hated Jamie. A lot. Everyone else seemed to love Jamie, but I really, really wanted to punch him. So much. Mel: AGREED. Ellis: SAME. He was constantly declaring he wasn’t one of those “stereotypical gays”, because he was *masculine*. How LGBTQ+ positive. "I never had baby dolls, never played dress up in my mom's high heels, and never wanted to join the cheerleading squad, so it wasn't like my mom knew I was gay." Blythe: BUT HE MUST BE MASCULINE, ELLIS. God forbid he embody stereotypes which he only perpetuates throughout the novel. Our Jamie is special and doesn't play with dolls or like high heels, he plays football! (But first off, get over yourself, Jamie. You played football once in the novel. You’re not the fucking spokesmodel for masculinity.) Ellis: I have one pro re: LGBTQ+ representation and that is that there's no bi erasure. At the end, when Jamie wonders whether Mason might be queer, he does mention the option of Mason being bi. That's a small plus. Blythe: I had one pro, that being supportive parents, but Jamie managed to turn that into something to complain about. Mel: He makes everything good into something to hate. Blythe: That's his entire character. And the entire plot of the novel hinges on how Mason will react to him being gay. But there was literally no indication that he would react negatively? - - - - - - - - "If there's one thing that girls--gay or straight--like, it's gay boys." Blythe: You mentioned problematic? Because that is the characterization pretty much all of the girls in the novel are built upon. Ellis: Urgh. Mel: Blurgh. Blythe: You'd think an LGBT novel would try its hardest to stray from using stereotypes to define its characters but that's ALL this novel manages to accomplish. I'm glad so many people love this and think it's adorable, but it's so incredibly problematic. All the characters and every single aspect of the world are built upon stereotypes. “He's one of those black kids everyone thinks should play basketball just because [he's tall]." Blythe: More problematic characterization! Basically, for an LGBT book, Fan Art has REALLY shitty representation of minorities. Jamie always describes the POC character in terms of racial stereotypes. Then said POC says about 14 lines in the entire novel, most of which are about five words. I counted. - - - - - - - - Read the rest of our discussion review on the blog here! We do not like this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Glass

    It's so fluffy, I'm gonna die. Little Agnes from Despicable Me told the best words ever and they can be used to describe the cuteness of new book by Sarah Tregay. I think I melted several times while I had been reading Fan Art. Why is this book awesome? - Because of the topic. Being in high school is tough as it is, but being a gay in high school can be even worse, especially when your classmates don't approve (to say it nicely) who and what you are. - Because it is sweet love story and not anot It's so fluffy, I'm gonna die. Little Agnes from Despicable Me told the best words ever and they can be used to describe the cuteness of new book by Sarah Tregay. I think I melted several times while I had been reading Fan Art. Why is this book awesome? - Because of the topic. Being in high school is tough as it is, but being a gay in high school can be even worse, especially when your classmates don't approve (to say it nicely) who and what you are. - Because it is sweet love story and not another social study packed in YA book trying to sound oh-so-serious. LGBT teens need something cute and fluffy and romantic too. They know all about how hard it is to be them in everyday life. The want to read romantic and fairy taleish love story too. The one that will make them believe that there is nothing wrong with being different and that he or she can get a guy or a girl too. - Family interaction. Jamie has the best parents ever. - It made me laugh and cry happy tears. - Because this is how the real life should look like. How LGBT kids should be treated. How parents should act. How your friends should react when they see you kissing your best friend. Who should read this book? Absolutely everyone!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    Adorable and very light; a perfect book for reading while I was on the road to BEA. While I had minor problems with this one, it was overall a real heartwarming love story that left me with a smile on my face. Jamie is gay, and it seems like everyone knows it except his crush, Mason - who also happens to be his best friend. From the beginning, I could tell this was going to be a fun-frustrating kind of read with a lot of longing and a lot of heart. Although it's not exactly the most unique book Adorable and very light; a perfect book for reading while I was on the road to BEA. While I had minor problems with this one, it was overall a real heartwarming love story that left me with a smile on my face. Jamie is gay, and it seems like everyone knows it except his crush, Mason - who also happens to be his best friend. From the beginning, I could tell this was going to be a fun-frustrating kind of read with a lot of longing and a lot of heart. Although it's not exactly the most unique book out there - it's a simple angst-filled LGBT story I've seen a few times, now - it has a lot to offer with its charismatic characters and the adoption of a unique angle with adding a fan art/comic element to the mix. The comic that the surrounds the plot also has a lot of parallels with the novel itself. The comic's critics complained of lack of plot, of being nothing but a love story that would be dull if not for the homosexuality of its leads, which mirrors this book exactly. While I agree with the critiques in a way about its plot - this book is definitely slow in its pacing, to say the least - I also think it's much more than just a love story. It's a story about a guy getting the courage to show his true self in a world that is still largely against it. It's a story about a relationship that comes with infinite struggles - from parental disapproval, to general discrimination, already seen by the students fear of not getting sponsored again. It's a story told at an important time in our history, especially for teenagers who are fighting the same fights. The MC, Jamie, could be a bit dense at times. It was clear to the reader for a long time that Mason was also in love with him. He kept offering hints and gestures that completely went over Jamie's head. I just wanted to slap him silly at times and make him realize his staying in the closet was only making him suffer all the more. He kept bringing up frail excuses to not tell Mason - "Oh, well, he kissed a girl" - "his hand grabbing mine must have been a mistake" - like, NO, DUDE!! Argh! The longing part? It was definitely present! Even when I was frustrated with Jamie, though, I loved anticipating the moment where they would finally kiss, because we all knew it was coming, and it was going to be epic! (And it was!) The side characters are very well written with tons of charisma and charm to win us over. The teenage voices are all realistic, including the drama, stupid decisions, and reactions surrounding this story. The poems scattered throughout are a wonderful addition to the novel, as well, that shows bits and pieces of how everyone has some kind of fears to overcome, some obstacles to sort out to begin to find themselves. Even though they're not crucial to the plot itself, they do give the book this extra layer of depth. Jamie does need a bit of patience on our part, but I found myself smiling, laughing, and sighing at the adventure that was his last year of high school - his last year in the closet. And I forgive him for being so oblivious, because who never thinks the best case scenario is the most unlikely? -- An advance copy was provided by the publisher for review. For more of my reviews, visit my blog at Xpresso Reads

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    2.5 stars Another well-intentioned book that makes me want to apologize for not liking it. People might assume that I feel disappointed with Fan Art because of its light, breezy nature, but I would disagree - I love Sarah Dessen, Stephanie Perkins, and even the occasional Deb Caletti. Fan Art had issues separate from its tone that prevented me from losing myself in its cute, lighthearted plot. I found Jamie's narrative disconcerting and at times offensive. The protagonist of our story, Jamie spend 2.5 stars Another well-intentioned book that makes me want to apologize for not liking it. People might assume that I feel disappointed with Fan Art because of its light, breezy nature, but I would disagree - I love Sarah Dessen, Stephanie Perkins, and even the occasional Deb Caletti. Fan Art had issues separate from its tone that prevented me from losing myself in its cute, lighthearted plot. I found Jamie's narrative disconcerting and at times offensive. The protagonist of our story, Jamie spends the entire book debating whether or not he should come out to his best friend Mason. Along the way, as other reviewers have pointed out, he stereotypes racial minorities, criticizes girls as gross and over-emotional, and assumes his best friend will dislike him because of his sexuality. I get the last one. As a gay guy, I still feel a bit of apprehension every time I come out to one of my straight, male friends. But Jamie has literally no evidence that Mason would end their friendship due to Jamie's preference for guys, and building an entire book based on that assumption felt underwhelming and contrived. Not all straight guys think that gay guys want to hit on them, especially those who appear as compassionate and kind as Mason. My main issue with Fan Art revolves around Jamie's lack of agency. As I mentioned above, the central conflict of the story comes from Jamie's indecision about whether he should come out to Mason. And yet, Jamie never really even makes a decision - he lets other people control his life, and somehow by the end of the book it all works out for the best. I'm not suggesting that every gay guy or lesbian girl should come out. But Jamie's lack of communication with Mason throughout the story irked me, because communication is such an essential part of any human relationship, whether it's a friendship, a romance, or a family connection. Mason received little development as well, which was disappointing considering his closeness to Jamie and the potential within their bond with one another. Overall, an okay read, but not one I would particularly recommend when there are so many other great stories out there. If only Jamie had more gumption.

  6. 5 out of 5

    caren

    This book, ya’ll. I am so glad the YA genre has it (or will have it soon). I know it’s not the first to approach the LGBT subject, and that it won’t be the last, but I still want to commend Sarah for putting Jamie’s story out into a genre dominated by hetero relationships. The simple fact is that there are kids out in our world who need these kinds of books. Kids who are facing the same kinds of decisions and situations as Jamie, and who might need that little extra push to come out of the close This book, ya’ll. I am so glad the YA genre has it (or will have it soon). I know it’s not the first to approach the LGBT subject, and that it won’t be the last, but I still want to commend Sarah for putting Jamie’s story out into a genre dominated by hetero relationships. The simple fact is that there are kids out in our world who need these kinds of books. Kids who are facing the same kinds of decisions and situations as Jamie, and who might need that little extra push to come out of the closet and live the life they deserve to live. Jamie Patterson is a senior in high school, just months away from graduating and moving on to the next steps in his life; to college and beyond. He’s got those every day high school kid worries, like finding a date to the prom and finishing up the high school’s literary magazine he volunteers for as the graphic designer, Gumshoe. He also has a secret. He’s gay. And while he’s out with his parents, he’s not out at school. He’s not out with his best friend. He’s still holding the secret close to his heart, terrified of what the truth of who he is will do to his life. But when he gets a little extra push to make a choice toward what’s right and what could keep his secret safe in the form of a graphic short written by one of the girls who runs the gay club in his school, he chooses to do what’s right. He chooses to go against the votes of other classmates, because he knows in his heart that censoring something because it’s not the norm just isn’t right. Even though it could threaten everything he’s built in his little world to keep his secret under wraps. This book is all about the struggle of a high school student—of anyone really—who’s trying to come out of that proverbial closet. I’ve seen firsthand how hard the choice can be, how the fallout can ruin someone. I’ve seen how crushing it can be to fall in love with your best friend only to have them drop you when they find out your feelings are less than platonic. This is what Jamie faces, what Jamie is struggling with. He wants so many things, but what he wants most of all is not to lose Mason, his best friend since they were kids. He’s a lucky guy, with kickass parents—his stepfather even threw him a party when he came out—good, supportive friends like Eden and Challis and all of the popular guys in school. Oh, and he has the most adorable twin sisters ever (oh, the swoons of him playing dolls with the girls sighhhhh). Jamie’s story is one of the beautiful ones. The ones that will warm your heart and make you feel like every kid who’s keeping this secret should let it out because screw what anyone else thinks. Sadly, we all know it’s not always easy, and things don’t always work out the way you want them to, but I hope this story will prove that no matter what, it shouldn’t stop anyone from being who they are. That’s exactly the message I want this book tol give to kids who read it. To anyone who reads it, really. I hope it will not only help kids like Jamie, but that it will give anyone who harbors any prejudices in their heart the little push they need to support someone who likes things they don’t. To embrace diversity and understand that everyone is different, and no matter who you love—who you kiss—you still deserve to be treated as what you are: a human being.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    1.5 stars Blythe, Ellis and I discussion reviewed this on the blog here. Things we talked about: - how this book is the worst LGBTQ+ book ever - except if there was another book about a bunch of Jamies (who is the MC). Man, that'd be a nightmare. - includes the letting out a breath I didn't realise I was holding sentence in the FIRST CHAPTER. It was a sign! - We all agree Jamie is the worst about a million times. He frets over nothing and judges people. He hates on girls for no reason. - Dialogue was 1.5 stars Blythe, Ellis and I discussion reviewed this on the blog here. Things we talked about: - how this book is the worst LGBTQ+ book ever - except if there was another book about a bunch of Jamies (who is the MC). Man, that'd be a nightmare. - includes the letting out a breath I didn't realise I was holding sentence in the FIRST CHAPTER. It was a sign! - We all agree Jamie is the worst about a million times. He frets over nothing and judges people. He hates on girls for no reason. - Dialogue was terrible and forced - Everyone is a plot device. Jamie is a plot device for himself. It's Inception. #Jamieption

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rashika (is tired)

    ***This review has also been posted on The Social Potato “We aren’t some fictional couple you can slash together. We’re people. Real people!” I came across this book while randomly scrolling through Edelweiss and it felt like I had hit the jackpot. Before we carry on, I think it’s somewhat important to explain what I just said. I once saw a video on youtube that got me thinking. The video had me hooked on to the idea of a guy trying to come out to his best friend and trying to tell him that he ***This review has also been posted on The Social Potato “We aren’t some fictional couple you can slash together. We’re people. Real people!” I came across this book while randomly scrolling through Edelweiss and it felt like I had hit the jackpot. Before we carry on, I think it’s somewhat important to explain what I just said. I once saw a video on youtube that got me thinking. The video had me hooked on to the idea of a guy trying to come out to his best friend and trying to tell him that he loved him. Suddenly, I wanted to know the story. I wanted to know what would happen. Would a happy ending occur or would things go down the drain and when I found this book it felt like a dream come true. I immediately downloaded it and I must say, this book did not disappoint. AT ALL. It was cute and fluffy and just all around sweet and it gave me the HEA I so desperately craved. Jamie was a joy to read about and I don’t think I’ve been this happy to meet a character. It’s like going on a blind date (not that I would know) and then finding the person to be of your liking.  He has one thing most of the other teens in their final year of school I've read about don’t have. HE ISN’T OBSESSED WITH COLLEGE. This is important to me since it’s my last year as well and I am glad to have come across a character who understands my deal with college. He wants to go to college, he looks forward to it, but he isn't OBSESSED. But that isn’t all. Jamie is all around relateable and a delightful character. I love his awkwardness, I love his fears, I love his modesty and I love how he strives to do the right thing even if it scares the crap out of him. Most of all though, I just love how he can be oblivious. And really, it's was just so FUN watching him finally settle into his skin. Jamie is hiding inside the closet. His parents know but he is too afraid to come out to everyone at school for the fear of messing up his relationship with his best friend. He doesn’t want things to become awkward between the two of them because he doesn’t know what he would do without Mason. The problem with that is that almost everyone knows that he’s gay (not that Jamie knows this). Or at least those girls in his art class do. This book turns into a slow journey of Jamie finding people who understand him and him finally letting go of his fears and embracing who he is. Mason was adorable. He is a nerd, he is cute and he is also the bestest friend ever. He never pushes Jamie but instead gives Jamie the space he needs. Sadly though, Mason doesn’t play as big of a role as he could have. Mason is almost in the sidelines for large chunks of the book because this book isn’t about Mason and Jamie. It’s about Jamie. It’s about Jamie finally finding the courage to be who he is and so it has a large focus on the people Jamie meets on his journey to self-acceptance. Like Eden and Challis. He becomes friends with the first and tries to smuggle in a LGBT friendly art piece for the art magazine the latter created. I actually loved his relationship with the gang. I loved watching him become friends with Eden and opening up to her. Jamie is always so confined because he has a secret to keep so it was a relief to see him finally relax a tad-bit. The relationship with his family was great and realistic in some ways. His step-dad tries too hard and sometimes Jamie is annoyed by the fact that his mom had the twins but in the end he loves all of them and that is that. “Thou shalt not check out thy best friend.” Well unless you’re sure they like you back but in Jamie’s case that’s not true. Hell Mason is probably straight and even if he was bi or gay, Jamie cannot be sure that Mason would like him back. A couple pages in and it’s kind of obvious which direction their relationship was headed in. The obviousness could have been annoying but it wasn't. These two characters aren't your usual cliches and neither was their relationship. It unfurled in a realistic manner. It was fun to lay back and watch everything unravel. Admittedly there were times where I just wanted to shake Jamie and tell him to stop being so blind but it all worked out in the end so it's all good. The plot of this book revolves around an art magazine and a certain LGBT friendly piece. The committee rejects the piece and that is what jump starts Jamie’s own journey of self-discovery. He becomes enraged at how people are close minded. It pisses him off that people could so easily waive off the idea because the community won’t accept it and because of this the LGBT community of his school won't get a voice. The idea behind the art magazine was slightly weak but in the end it worked well with what the author was trying to achieve. Some of the art pieces were actually featured in the book and I enjoyed reading the poetry presented. Also it was fun seeing the gang trying to push the two together by dropping subtle hints (that Jamie was too scared, with good reason, to pick up on). This book isn’t without some clichés. Obviously. But somehow they work. I didn't feel like I was reading a completely unrealistic book. Yes sometimes it did border on unrealistic but it worked for me. I found it to be a thoroughly entertaining read and I’d definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to read something chick-lity and light. Note that all quotes have been taken from an uncorrected proof and may be subject to change

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ellis

    So. Blythe, Mel and I all hated this book, because of quotes like: I never had baby dolls, never played dress up in my mom's high heels, and never wanted to join the cheerleading squad, so it wasn't like my mom knew I was gay. Because there's only one way to be gay, right? "Woo-hoo!” Challis leaps off her desk and opens her arms as if she's going to hug me. But then she stops, as if she thinks twice. I wipe the unintentional girls-are-icky look from my face and open my arms. Because, as a gay guy, y So. Blythe, Mel and I all hated this book, because of quotes like: I never had baby dolls, never played dress up in my mom's high heels, and never wanted to join the cheerleading squad, so it wasn't like my mom knew I was gay. Because there's only one way to be gay, right? "Woo-hoo!” Challis leaps off her desk and opens her arms as if she's going to hug me. But then she stops, as if she thinks twice. I wipe the unintentional girls-are-icky look from my face and open my arms. Because, as a gay guy, you can't possibly like girls platonically, right? Nope. All girls are disgusting. “He's one of those black kids everyone thinks should play basketball just because [he's tall]." Because stereotypes, right? This one might seem innocent but it's ridiculous how much racial stereotyping there is in this book. Read what else we have to say on Finding Bliss in Books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    4.5 stars. Sarah Tregay’s Fan Art is a hopeful and charming coming-of-age YA novel about the experiences of first love, coming out, and those last, nerve-wracking days of high school that lead to an uncertain future. Readers of all ages will be able to connect with this novel and the characters, no matter their sexuality. The novel follows Jamie Peterson, a seventeen year-old closeted boy who is about to graduate from high school with one major problem: he is in love with his straight best friend 4.5 stars. Sarah Tregay’s Fan Art is a hopeful and charming coming-of-age YA novel about the experiences of first love, coming out, and those last, nerve-wracking days of high school that lead to an uncertain future. Readers of all ages will be able to connect with this novel and the characters, no matter their sexuality. The novel follows Jamie Peterson, a seventeen year-old closeted boy who is about to graduate from high school with one major problem: he is in love with his straight best friend, Mason. As hard as Jamie tries to keep his sexuality a secret, it seems as though everyone already knows, particularly the slash fan girls in his art class who are determined to help Jamie get together with Mason. But Jamie is terrified that if he confesses his feelings to Mason, he will be rejected and lose Mason’s friendship altogether. While unsuccessfully trying to supress his feelings for Mason, Jamie also has to contend with the annoying editors of the school magazine that don’t want to feature a comic about homosexual characters, a comic that has come to mean so much to Jamie. Jamie must stand up for what he believes in and take a chance on newfound love. I didn’t know what to expect when I picked up this novel. Reading the reviews on Goodreads conveyed mixed feelings as half of the reviews awarded the novel 4-5 stars, while the other half only 1-2 stars. It was an incredible amount of varied opinions and, as I have always wanted to read this novel, decided that the only way I would receive my answer was to read the book myself. And I am so glad I did. Fan Art explores the delights and the troubles of friendship and what it takes for one to face their worst fear. The friendship between Jamie and Mason is so dear to both of them that they each fear the consequences of the revelation of their secrets. Friendship was the driving force of the novel; whether it be Mason’s and Jamie’s, Eden’s and Jamie’s, or even the friendship between minor characters like Broadie and Kellen, friendship is depicted as the most important aspect of life and something that ties people together. I adored the inclusion of the short backstory to the “I love you, man” and what that conveys to the reader. In the novel, a teenage boy (years ago) passed away in a car accident and his friends, when questioned about the impact of his death on live T.V. said, “I love you, man,” which has become the school’s unofficial friendship call among young men. I love that. I love that, in the book, teenage boys feel no fear or anguish of homophobia from telling other males “I love you, man.” It is a simple way to express friendship and I wish it were that easy for teenage boys to do that in real life. The novel also depicts the pressure and increase of boundaries and how other people’s beliefs and ideas can alter or even impede your own. Jamie is comfortable in the closet; only his parents know he is gay, or so he thinks. Most of the school suspects Jamie’s true orientation and many of the girls in his art class are shipping him with Mason. I know from reading other reviews that this particular issue is what many people took umbrage with: the fact that the girls ignored Jamie’s personal feelings and drew fan art of him and Mason, as well as writing slash fiction about them. The results of their actions forces Jamie to not only be very uncomfortable, but face things he is nowhere near ready to. Deciding when to come out of the closet is an incredibly personal issue and the fact that many characters were attempting to coerce Jamie to do so before he is ready is unconscionable and unfair. I completely agree with many other reviewers on that point, but I do also understand the opposing side, too. I understand how the girls in the novel, particularly Eden, desire a happy ending for Mason and Jamie and can’t help but want to be a part of that journey. I love romance and to see one unfolding right before your eyes, albeit with two particularly dense boys, it is easy to see how quickly Eden and the girls get caught up in their fantasies, and ignore Mason and Jamie’s feelings. I do not condone their behaviour, but it does not come from a place of hate or homophobia; rather, they temporarily forget that Mason and Jamie are real people, not characters on screen or in fan art, and so insert themselves in Mason and Jamie’s narrative. I have no doubt that if I were in high school today, I would have felt welcome amongst the yaoi and slash girls. Jamie is an interesting protagonist. There are a few times I became exasperated by him, but I generally enjoy reading about him and understanding his thought process. Another reason many people did not enjoy this novel is because Jamie could be an annoying character who questions every decision he makes. While there were times that did get quite dry, I do not see this as an annoying trait. Unless one is in the closet, they have no idea how anxious and apprehensive it can make you. Of course Jamie would be questioning every decision he makes: he is terrified that someone might guess his secret! I did, however, agree with the point that Jamie can sometimes come across as insensitive to women. I wouldn’t call him sexist – he is just very naïve when it came to girls and a little silly with the few mentions of “girl cooties.” Come on, Tregay. I did love the development of Jamie and Mason’s friendship. It is touching, heartbreaking and beautiful all at the same time. I have read a few friends-to-lovers stories, but I truly believe Fan Art is perhaps one of the greatest. Fan Art is an adorable and hilarious coming-of-age story about the ups and downs of love and finding oneself. If you love YA LGBTQI+ fiction, don’t miss out on this sweet story. I, for one, am dying for a sequel and I hope Tregay delivers. Check out my blog and reviews: thebookcorps.wordpress.com

  11. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Very mixed feelings about this one. A cute story, I guess, with likable characters, solid writing, plenty of tension, and very sweet romance. Interracial couples are always great. Nice to see a book about non-bi queer teens that acknowledges the existence of bisexual people. The ending did feel rushed and not entirely satisfying. After all of Jamie's angst, it was anticlimactic that (view spoiler)[ his relationship with Mason became perfect and romantic instantly without any sort of discussion or Very mixed feelings about this one. A cute story, I guess, with likable characters, solid writing, plenty of tension, and very sweet romance. Interracial couples are always great. Nice to see a book about non-bi queer teens that acknowledges the existence of bisexual people. The ending did feel rushed and not entirely satisfying. After all of Jamie's angst, it was anticlimactic that (view spoiler)[ his relationship with Mason became perfect and romantic instantly without any sort of discussion or conflict between the two of them. Why was Jamie so worried about Mason's reaction for the whole book if there was literally no basis for his worry other than "I think, but am not sure, that my friend is straight and therefore assume that me coming out to him will utterly destroy our friendship"? Like, that's a legitimate and realistic internal conflict for Jamie, but if that was supposed to be the main conflict of the entire story, it was wrapped up way too neatly and with way too little agency/effort on Jamie's part. (Even though Jamie gets the graphic short story published, it is Mason who actually deals with the issue of their relationship.) (hide spoiler)] Also, something about the whole fan art part of the story just weirded me out. There is a time and a place for addressing the problematic aspects of fandom culture, particularly shipping culture. There is a time and a place for critiquing the fetishizing of queer people through fanfiction and fan art. But the way the book addressed this issue felt unrealistic and off-putting. Most fangirls I know would never produce fanworks shipping real people--certainly not real people in their everyday lives! (Celebrities, maybe. Occasionally. Rarely.) That plot point seemed to vilify fangirls unnecessarily by implying that such actions are typical fangirl behavior. The production of queer fanworks has many positive purposes for fans, including, and perhaps especially, queer female fans; these positive aspects of fandom were addressed only simplistically ("I just wanted somebody to get a happy ending" or whatever the excuse was). The production of queer fanworks also hardly ever causes tangible harm to real people. Given how poorly mainstream society views fandom culture already, I was disappointed with these aspects of the representation of fandom. Fandom is not just a bunch of horny teenage girls developing fetishistic obsessions with gay men! Like, seriously, give me a break . On top of that, there's just a strange meta twist to the whole thing. We, as readers, experience Jamie and Mason's fictional romance the same way we would experience a piece of gay fanfiction. Yet, in the story, fangirls are condemned for enjoying gay fanfiction, which is depicted as being voyeuristic and invasive of real people's privacy, as well as causing significant harm to real people. Obviously Jamie and Mason are not real people, yet in order to immerse ourselves in the story, we must maintain the illusion that they are. So suddenly the narrative is indirectly condemning *us* for...well, basically, enjoying the narrative. The characters are implying that we, as fangirls, are being voyeuristic and causing harm to real people by reading gay romance stories. Which presumably includes their own story. I'm getting a headache. It's hard for me to articulate this, but basically, the book seems determined to alienate and chastise its readers by setting up a parallel wherein characters who act as the "readers" within the story are the bad guys. Which...is not the way to create a pleasurable reading experience. Again, I think there's a sharp difference between enjoying queer media (and queer fanworks of all types of media) and violating the privacy and dignity of real human beings. This distinction was not drawn very effectively in this book, and the problem was exacerbated by the format and content of the book itself, which made for an off-putting and uncomfortable reading experience overall, speaking as someone who actively participates in a variety of fandoms and also cares a lot about queer representation in media etc etc. It was just. Weird?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Narh

    Everyone has a weak spot for a certain genre of books. While my 'me' books are realistic with teens that have serious, life threatening problems, I have an unbelievable weak spot for GLBT, more specifically gay boys. I don't even fucking know why or how this came to be but it is what it is. Anyway, moving onto the book, Fan Art is a hit or miss type of book. It's cute and light, with some deep undertones however, it's also judgemental and stereotypical. For me, this story was a miss that was al Everyone has a weak spot for a certain genre of books. While my 'me' books are realistic with teens that have serious, life threatening problems, I have an unbelievable weak spot for GLBT, more specifically gay boys. I don't even fucking know why or how this came to be but it is what it is. Anyway, moving onto the book, Fan Art is a hit or miss type of book. It's cute and light, with some deep undertones however, it's also judgemental and stereotypical. For me, this story was a miss that was almost a hit. I'll start the bad stuff off with the representation of the GLBT community. The stereotypes of what makes a gay boy gay is horrible. I was angry with the way that Jamie thinks that since he never played with dolls, never played dress up, and plays sports that it's crazy that he turned out gay. Another thing that I disliked about Fan Art is the school part of it all. I get that it's all about the art but Jamie gets a scholarship to play music at a university yet there is close to no music explained in the whole book. I'm a band kid, I was excited once he mentioned he's in band but it's not properly explained how he practices and lets the music take hold of him. It's just straightforward boring. The relationship between Jamie and Mason was also a problem for me because it feels a bit contrived at many times. Readers are told they're extremely close but for a lot of the novel, I didn't feel it since there aren't enough flashbacks and such to support their relationship. My relationship with Jamie is a love/hate one. I hated how harsh and stupid he is but I loved how awkward and nervous he is. He remind me of myself and I could relate to his situation because it happened to myself. I was screaming, laughing, and all around flipping out whenever something happened between Jamie and Mason. I just couldn't stop myself. The writing is smooth and relaxed, I found myself reading instead of studying for my exams many times. Adding on to all of that, I loved that Tregay decided to add in the art works that are featured in Gumshoe. The poems and visual art pieces make the story more unique. Fan Art is not a book for everyone. Although it is light, it has a few problems and some of them are offensive. However, I found some things to be enjoyable, like the romance and the characters despite them being undeveloped. I recommend this to anyone looking for a story to pass the time and enjoy fun albeit underdeveloped characters, art, and don't mind a typical love story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Giselle (Book Nerd Canada)

    An Electronic Advanced Reader Copy was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss for review. Quotes have been pulled from an ARC and may be subject to change. Jamie loves Mason, and he doesn't even know how he can tell him. When fangirls from the Art club decide to create a comic strip that wholly resembles the two, that's when Jamie gathers courage to tell his best friend the truth. That he's gay and in love with him. Will he accept him or not? Fan Art was a cute little contemporary story that had An Electronic Advanced Reader Copy was provided by the publisher via Edelweiss for review. Quotes have been pulled from an ARC and may be subject to change. Jamie loves Mason, and he doesn't even know how he can tell him. When fangirls from the Art club decide to create a comic strip that wholly resembles the two, that's when Jamie gathers courage to tell his best friend the truth. That he's gay and in love with him. Will he accept him or not? Fan Art was a cute little contemporary story that had me smiling at different points. Starting a book that has two boys as a couple is new and refreshing. Having it be the main character's best friend tended to be problematic. There's nothing worse than being friends with someone you're in love with. And this was the biggest issue that Jaimie goes through. You see him struggle with his feelings and it was so hard for him. How much he felt especially when he was around him. Of course, I was cheering for them to get together every second I was reading. It was just so cute. Obviously, you know as a reader that they both care for each other very deeply, and that it took a while for them to realize it. It's like one of those movies that you keep watching just so you can see them kiss in the end. I thought the book's length was just right, neither was it too long or too short. The story develops in comfortable pace, but I just felt bored at some parts only because nothing really happens much except their daily lives. I just wanted to know if the two would get together and that was the main reason why I kept on reading. If you love your cute contemporaries, be sure to pick this one up. Fan Art had me smiling and laughing all through out the book. Definitely recommend for a light-heart read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bárbara

    It was a cute, fluffy story as far as the main character is concerned. Jamie is a relatable character with a particularly complex story- and Mason is a nice complement to it all. The reason for my lower rating is the girls. Their behaviour is creepy and inexcusable, no matter how many apologies there were. The fetishizing factor was disgusting. Overall, it was a fun, entertaining read, but unfortunately I think I'm too old to have enjoyed it properly. May work much better with people at least 10 It was a cute, fluffy story as far as the main character is concerned. Jamie is a relatable character with a particularly complex story- and Mason is a nice complement to it all. The reason for my lower rating is the girls. Their behaviour is creepy and inexcusable, no matter how many apologies there were. The fetishizing factor was disgusting. Overall, it was a fun, entertaining read, but unfortunately I think I'm too old to have enjoyed it properly. May work much better with people at least 10 or even 15 years younger than my 28.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel "Sempere"

    Adorable ☺☺ Adorable ☺️☺️

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mimi 'Pans' Herondale

    This book was amazing, I absolutely loved it! First of all, I love the main character. Jamie is adorable, and then when he has that crush on Mason and can't figure out how to tell him that he is gay and likes him...well, that makes him double adorable. I also love Mason, and I also liked Eden. And felt sorry for her as well! My favorite scene was probably one of the last ending scenes. (view spoiler)[ it was the one where he kissed Mason. And then at the party where they kissed again...it was a This book was amazing, I absolutely loved it! First of all, I love the main character. Jamie is adorable, and then when he has that crush on Mason and can't figure out how to tell him that he is gay and likes him...well, that makes him double adorable. I also love Mason, and I also liked Eden. And felt sorry for her as well! My favorite scene was probably one of the last ending scenes. (view spoiler)[ it was the one where he kissed Mason. And then at the party where they kissed again...it was a dream come true. (hide spoiler)] And the plot. I can never manage to write a review without mentioning the plot. He wanted to come out to his friend about him being gay but couldn't manage it because he thought that he would stop being friends with him, or would still be friends but would keep remembering that his BFF was gay. And yes, I loved that. And then Eden was also a lesbian...that was amazedballs! So, overall, I have no bad thoughts about this book and will probably reread it again later. I LOVE IT!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Wrona

    DNF @ 50 pages WHAT HAPPENED? I expected great things about this book... but then at the same time, I expected bad things as well. There were mixed reviews all around, but I am so sad to have uncompleted it. What was I supposed to do or say? For the 50 pages that I read, I found that nothing was happening and it was a no-plot story. It had the potential to become a favourite, I could see it like that, but it ended up totally boring and unimposing. Fan Art was diverse. That was probably the only DNF @ 50 pages WHAT HAPPENED? I expected great things about this book... but then at the same time, I expected bad things as well. There were mixed reviews all around, but I am so sad to have uncompleted it. What was I supposed to do or say? For the 50 pages that I read, I found that nothing was happening and it was a no-plot story. It had the potential to become a favourite, I could see it like that, but it ended up totally boring and unimposing. Fan Art was diverse. That was probably the only great and positive thing this book had. The rest of the time I was yawning and reminding my eyes to keep themselves open. And for 50 pages? Who would've thought that they'd get that bored so easily? What I did recognize that this book was about was that Jamie Peterson is going crazy, wondering who he'll take to prom. Everyone supposedly has a date except for him, and that drives him bonkers. He has fallen in love with his best friend, Mason. And stuff happens afterwards which drives everyone around Jamie crazy but no one knows that he likes Mason except him and himself... and some giggling chicks in his art class. At least that was supposed to happen... But I didn't get to that part because I decided to not give this book a chance. So for those of you who did love this book, I'm totally sorry. *says sarcastically* Okay, I'm #sorrynotsorry. There are a ton of people, who no offense, have began a book and DNF-ed it at ten pages. So you should cut me some slack here and feel bad for me instead. This book has now depressed me because it ended up pretty bad in my opinion. I didn't like Jamie, I didn't like Mason, I didn't like the story or the writing. What else was there to enjoy? Nothing, I tell you. The feelings that I got after putting this book down was that feeling when you don't see a speck of snow on the ground on Christmas. Non-white Christmases suck, at least for those of us who have witnessed snow in one way or another. There was no happiness for me when reading this book. I sat on the couch with a monotone and poker face until I let it go. And then I grinned like a maniac because I was just so happy it was over. *cries inside* It does make me sad that I didn't find any sort of enjoyment when reading this, except for the fact that the romance could've possibly taken a stand if the chance came, but I let it go. No guilt, no regrets, just sadness is what's left of me after I put this down. I honestly don't even know if I should recommend this book to you or not. In some ways, it's totally worth it if you're not even looking for a good story but just some humour and diversity mixed together. But if you're in for a serious read, I'd run away and hide yourself on top of the tallest building in the world if I were you. Good luck! This review can also be found on A Thousand Lives Lived, check it out for more reviews!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Iz

    God, that was just adorable. My mind is full of "aaaaaw"'s and "asffdjkksjja"'s. I feel like the giggling-geek-art-girls from Jamie's class. This was a really fun, light and easy read. I took my mind off my life and sent me to Jamie's, with his adorable family (I loved his mum.) and fangirling classmates and his secret crush on his best friend, Mason. I really enjoyed reading about him, his struggles felt so real and oh my, he IS SO ADORABLE. I admired his strengh, the way he fought for what he bel God, that was just adorable. My mind is full of "aaaaaw"'s and "asffdjkksjja"'s. I feel like the giggling-geek-art-girls from Jamie's class. This was a really fun, light and easy read. I took my mind off my life and sent me to Jamie's, with his adorable family (I loved his mum.) and fangirling classmates and his secret crush on his best friend, Mason. I really enjoyed reading about him, his struggles felt so real and oh my, he IS SO ADORABLE. I admired his strengh, the way he fought for what he believed in. His friendship with Mason was really amazing and cute. One of reasons I'm not giving this a full five-stars rating, though, is because he realizes way too suddenly he has a crush on Mason, I didn't find it realistic enough. Plus, I would have liked a few more pages. I turned the last one and I was slightly disappointed: not because of the ending itself THE EMBODIMENT OF CUTENESS AND AAAAAWWWW but because it's too sudden. Mason was also an amazing character but I really really loved Eden, cute and funny, and Chillas, such a badass. And Kellen and Brodie? God, I certainly didn't expect their "fanboy" side! Aw. Read this if you're looking for a fun and romantic book, hopefully you'll love this as I did! ADORABLE, ADORABLE, ADORABLE.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oda Renate

    This book reminded me of Simon vs the homosapiens agenda, it had that cute gay romance story yet off course its not completely similar. Also this one was out first. The title makes you think its focus is fandoms and fan art which it is not, yet the title is not a bad one. It fits the story. The summary at the back just tells you the start of the book which I suppose is good that means it does not spoil you which it does not. Read it or regret it!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ornella (Nyx)

    2.5 Stars I'm not entirely sure how to review this, mostly because it was just okay. A nice enough, cute read. It didn't stand out. Yes, it was enjoyable, but in that very superficial way, that once you are done, or take a long enough break between reading you pretty much forget about it. Cute read, but not memorable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pia

    3.5 stars RTC later I can't think straight when it's 4.30 am

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah (fullybookedreviews)

    I unashamedly adored this one. ADORED IT. No, it wasn't flawless, but dammit, I was just so charmed to read an LGBT book with a happy ending. So many times in mainstream media, the gay character is always the token sidekick, or always ends up with some tragic event happening killing any chance of a HEA. But Fan Art dealt with that age-old dilemma - falling for one's best friend. Except this time, its doubly-difficult because Jamie's crush is a seemingly straight dude who he's been best friends wi I unashamedly adored this one. ADORED IT. No, it wasn't flawless, but dammit, I was just so charmed to read an LGBT book with a happy ending. So many times in mainstream media, the gay character is always the token sidekick, or always ends up with some tragic event happening killing any chance of a HEA. But Fan Art dealt with that age-old dilemma - falling for one's best friend. Except this time, its doubly-difficult because Jamie's crush is a seemingly straight dude who he's been best friends with since forever. I loved the cast of characters - I mean, (view spoiler)[ his parents threw him a freaking coming-out party with cake! (hide spoiler)] And his friends were pretty awesome too, even the jock-y type ones. There were some tired stereotypes at times, and it did get a bit teenagerish (yes, I'm making up words in this review. Just roll with it.) but overall, a funny, sweet contemporary read. And I especially liked the poetry. Give this one a go if you need something to put a smile on your face and make you go "AW."

  23. 4 out of 5

    bee

    This book seemed more to me like a bad fanfiction written by a thirteen year old than a published book by an adult author. It was appalling, it was creepy and fetishized m/m relationships...Extremely disrespectful to gay and bisexual men and the LGBT+ community as a whole.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Avery (ThePagemaster)

    Just a cute, light, fluffy, cutesy/fartsy, coming(out) of age story. If you look past the typical high-school politics/settings/blah-blah-blah of a YA contemporary, it's a nice in-between read if you're in a slump or just finished a series and need a quick pick me up. Jamie was me in high school: a quiet, nerdy kid that's sorta-friends with everybody, wants to be giving, but forgets it's ok to be selfish from time to time. I will say a couple characters pissed me off, besides the 'cookie-cutter, Just a cute, light, fluffy, cutesy/fartsy, coming(out) of age story. If you look past the typical high-school politics/settings/blah-blah-blah of a YA contemporary, it's a nice in-between read if you're in a slump or just finished a series and need a quick pick me up. Jamie was me in high school: a quiet, nerdy kid that's sorta-friends with everybody, wants to be giving, but forgets it's ok to be selfish from time to time. I will say a couple characters pissed me off, besides the 'cookie-cutter, jock character'(because you're suppose to) and semi-skim-read their dialogue. The poems and illustrations were very nice and it really added more ground to the story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra {semi-hiatus}

    "There are three ways to say, I love you, man. The first one is an announcement, said at full volume and often accompanied by a swear word. It’s sort of Thank you, sort of You’re cool, with a little And damn, you make me look good thrown in. This is how Kellen said it. The second one is a diss, said with four and a half tons of sarcasm and most likely a reference to the father, son, or Holy Ghost. There’s no sort of about it. It means I hate you right now. The third one comes wrapped in caution ta "There are three ways to say, I love you, man. The first one is an announcement, said at full volume and often accompanied by a swear word. It’s sort of Thank you, sort of You’re cool, with a little And damn, you make me look good thrown in. This is how Kellen said it. The second one is a diss, said with four and a half tons of sarcasm and most likely a reference to the father, son, or Holy Ghost. There’s no sort of about it. It means I hate you right now. The third one comes wrapped in caution tape. It is said quietly and on its own, without any adjectives. There’s no ‘sort of’ to this one, either, because you mean it. Like I did." Originally, I only bought this because I had heard of it briefly from Goodreads and I found it for under two dollars at a thrift store. The synopsis intrigued me and despite the mixed opinions, who can resist a two dollar book? I'm so glad I picked this up. While it was severely cliche in some aspects, and pretty predictable, it was cute and kept me turning pages. It read like a gay Kasie West novel, with a little input from Rainbow Rowell on the ways of the geek. I loved all the little references to things; Mason looking like Latin Darren Criss, life not being a David Levithan novel, even though that would be awesome, and how fangirls will ship anything so long as it's gay. The portrayal of small town homophobia was pretty on point as well. Lots of people claim they're okay with it until someone they're close to comes out of the closet. Suddenly, being gay puts you in the same circle of hell as Hitler and Hannibal Lector. I've witnessed this kind of thing first hand, and the way Sarah Tregay writes it is one hundred percent spot on. Small town homophobia is never blatantly obvious; it takes someone coming out to see it. I loved the trip to McCall so freaking much. The jet skiing was hilarious and adorable. Jamie's internal debate over whether to wrap his arms around Mason and risk being "weird" or to just fall off. I face-palmed on his behalf many times. I'm trying for spoiler free (or at least important-to-plot spoiler free), the condo though. So perfectly adorable. I know this usually goes without saying for someone who bases whatever she reads 100% on the cast, but I thought even though there were some major cliches at work, that these characters were precious. They were flawed and screwed up A LOT, but I adore them none the less. Even when I found Jamie's ways to be a bit extreme and some of the stuff he said to be obnoxious, I can see why he acted the way he did. Same for Eden. I wish tie dye boy got some more screen time though... Sequel perhaps? Overall, adorable and a cute little beach read. Perfect for a weekend vacation or week at camp. Definitely would recommend for fans of Kasie West, tumblr addicts, and those who understand the realm of fandom. :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Nose Graze — Book reviews & blogging tips Fan Art was adorable! Even though I've never been in his situation, I totally connected with Jamie! He's 'out' to his parents, but can't come out to Mason because he's afraid that it will change their friendship (for the worse). I completely understood his reasons and his hesitation. I felt the full weight of the decision coming down on him! If I were in his shoes, I think I would have been equally terrified to come out to my best friend. For some reas Nose Graze — Book reviews & blogging tips Fan Art was adorable! Even though I've never been in his situation, I totally connected with Jamie! He's 'out' to his parents, but can't come out to Mason because he's afraid that it will change their friendship (for the worse). I completely understood his reasons and his hesitation. I felt the full weight of the decision coming down on him! If I were in his shoes, I think I would have been equally terrified to come out to my best friend. For some reason, parents seem like an easier hurdle. I also liked Jamie's interaction with his art friends, like Eden. She was a great character and I loved how comfortable she was in her skin. I think there are two things I wasn't crazy about in Fan Art . First, I felt it lull a bit in the 45-70% mark. There wasn't a ton going on other than Jamie just struggling with the same decision over and over again. I completely felt for him, I did, but I couldn't help but get a little bored when nothing new was happening. And secondly, I think I wish we saw a tad more of Mason. We only got a couple moments of Mason and Jamie together. Sometimes it felt like Eden, Jamie's friend, had a bigger role than Mason did. But the end... The end was SO SWEET! I won't spoil it, but I promise you will love it! It melted my heart a little. I think Fan Art is a really unique book in the world of YA. There aren't a lot of LGBT books in the YA world, but this is one, and I think it's really sweet and empowering. One of the best parts was how supportive Jamie's parents were. I love how they were so proud of Jamie and always encouraged him. We don't get enough awesome, supportive parents like this in YA! Huge props, Sarah Tregay! Fan Art is not only an interesting read, but I think it also has the potential to empower teenagers struggling with the same thing Jamie is. This would be such an amazing book to read for anyone struggling with their sexual identity or coming out to their parents/friends/neighbours/etc.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Javi

    This book was quite a pleasant surprise. The story has been told before in multiple forms : a still-in-the-closet high school student struggling to come out, and especially to his straight best friend ( or is he?) But after reading so much crap from John Green, it's always a welcome break to find someone who will take the time to develop credible teenage characters, will all their awkwardness and insecurities, teenagers who speak as such and not like pretentious wannabe poets. We were all teenag This book was quite a pleasant surprise. The story has been told before in multiple forms : a still-in-the-closet high school student struggling to come out, and especially to his straight best friend ( or is he?) But after reading so much crap from John Green, it's always a welcome break to find someone who will take the time to develop credible teenage characters, will all their awkwardness and insecurities, teenagers who speak as such and not like pretentious wannabe poets. We were all teenagers at one point, did any of you speak, think or act like say for instance the protagonists of " The Fault In Our Stars"? I sure didn't. I was confused, scared and overall...well confused :) And that's why Jamie, the protagonist, comes across as a credible teenager and reliable narrator, because you can relate to him, whether you're gay or not. And unlike so many others, the author has bothered to include art as the medium through which most of the plot takes place, thus taking a story that would have been a carbon copy of about a thousand others into something much more appealing and engaging. You get emotionally invested in the characters, you care what happens to them and it pays off. Throw into the mix homophobia and gay rights and we have a winner. Its not very long so it's an easy read, so if you have a little time then read it, you won't be disappointed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    - ̗̀ jess ̖́-

    Started out as your run of the mill coming out story and turned into a pretty cute romance. Unfortunately? The plot was MASSIVELY predictable. I guessed pretty much everything that was going to happen. (Then again, I've read a boatload of coming out stories over the years.) It wasn't much of a surprise. Things I liked: even though this was primarily gay, the two other major characters were both lesbians and got together in the end - usually in coming out stories there's just the main character an Started out as your run of the mill coming out story and turned into a pretty cute romance. Unfortunately? The plot was MASSIVELY predictable. I guessed pretty much everything that was going to happen. (Then again, I've read a boatload of coming out stories over the years.) It wasn't much of a surprise. Things I liked: even though this was primarily gay, the two other major characters were both lesbians and got together in the end - usually in coming out stories there's just the main character and the love interest. I didn't like how the girls were generally portrayed, though. They seemed shallow, which was disappointing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stacee

    This was absolute perfection. Loved Jamie, loved Mason, loved every single word. Well, except the use of that other f-word that's not fuck. This story is fantastic and definitely needed to be told. I can only imagine this is what kids are actually going through these days. Jamie's mom was fabulous. I enjoyed her support [and Frank's party] throughout the book. The ending? Gah, it was absolutely perfect. I probably reread a couple of scenes a few times before I could continue. I can't wait to get This was absolute perfection. Loved Jamie, loved Mason, loved every single word. Well, except the use of that other f-word that's not fuck. This story is fantastic and definitely needed to be told. I can only imagine this is what kids are actually going through these days. Jamie's mom was fabulous. I enjoyed her support [and Frank's party] throughout the book. The ending? Gah, it was absolutely perfect. I probably reread a couple of scenes a few times before I could continue. I can't wait to get my greedy hands on a finished copy. **Huge thanks to Katherine Tegen books and Edelweiss for providing the arc in exchange for an honest review**

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fari

    I was gonna give it 3.5 stars or so but then at the end-ish, there was a HP and Hogwarts reference and nobody's gonna hurt if I rate this 4 stars, right? ;) My first LGBTQ+ book where the main characters are gay, or at least I think so. I'm not sure. *shrugs* It's kinda slow at times and kinda annoying at others but overall, pretty awesome! :) Especially since my last two books were so shitty.

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